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Suicidal Thoughts

SCIENCE
May 2, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Suicide rates among Americans 35 to 64 years old rose 28% from 1999 to 2010, from 13.7 per 100,000 people to 17.6 per 100,000 people, the CDC reported Thursday.  The greatest increases occurred in people 50 to 54 years old (up 48%) and among people 55 to 59 years old (up 49%). Among men, suicides in middle-aged people rose 27.3%; among women, 31.5%. Whites and Native Americans had steeper increases than other demographic groups.  Rates increased in all states, whether they had relatively high, average or low suicide rates.
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SPORTS
June 1, 2012 | By Chuck Schilken
Nancy Emsley says she once lectured Junior Seau about the dangers of taking a powerful sleep-aid drug without getting a full night's sleep afterward. "He just rolled his eyes," the friend and workout partner of the late football star said. Emsley's account, part of a USA Today article on the days leading up to Seau's suicide last month, is quite telling. It paints a picture of a seemingly carefree guy who also took powerful drugs, sometimes not as directed, to combat a sleep disorder.
OPINION
September 18, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Glendale school officials have hired a firm to monitor the social media postings of their students, apparently in an effort to learn about potentially dangerous behavior such as cyberbullying, suicidal thoughts, sexual harassment or drug use. The firm might turn up some troubling stuff, and even if it doesn't, knowing that Big Schoolmarm is watching might persuade some teenagers to show a little more caution about what they broadcast online, which would...
SCIENCE
May 3, 2007 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved the strongest possible warning for antidepressants to alert doctors and patients that the drugs could increase the risk of suicidal thinking and behavior in adults 18 to 24. The so-called black box warning follows a similar labeling change approved in 2004 for children and adolescents.
NEWS
February 6, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
In 2004, the Food and Drug Administration announced that antidepressant packages should carry a "black box" warning describing an increased risk of suicide and suicidal thoughts in children and youths up to age 25. The FDA action triggered a significant decline in antidepressant use among children and teens. Now, however, an analysis suggests there is no reason to believe that antidepressants influence suicidal thinking in kids. The paper, published online Monday in the Archives of General Psychiatry , analyzed data from 41 clinical trials involving more than 9,000 adults and children.
NATIONAL
February 18, 2005 | From the Washington Post
Adults taking popular antidepressants such as Prozac, Paxil and Zoloft are more than twice as likely to attempt suicide as patients given a placebo, according to an analysis released Thursday of hundreds of clinical trials involving tens of thousands of patients. The results mirror a recent finding of the Food and Drug Administration that the drugs increase suicidal thoughts and behavior among some children, and they offer tangible support to concerns going back 15 years.
HEALTH
November 9, 2009 | Jill U. Adams
Last month, a Palo Alto high school saw its fourth student suicide since May. Questions loom large: Why did this cluster of suicides happen, and how can the cycle be stopped? Public health officials and scientists use the term "suicide contagion" to describe the spread of suicidal thoughts among a group of people that results in such copycat acts. Researchers have studied suicide clusters to identify how the contagion might spread -- whether close friends of the victim are at more risk; whether more media coverage is associated with more deaths; and what telltale signs might point to the most vulnerable community members so that interventions can be targeted appropriately.
NEWS
September 21, 1990 | From United Press International
The Bucks County coroner, ignoring calls from citizens groups, said Thursday that he has no intention of reopening the investigation into the suicide of political activist Abbie Hoffman. The Citizens Commission on Human Rights and the Prozac Survivors Support Group--both offshoots of the Church of Scientology--had asked the coroner to reopen the case after it was learned that Hoffman took the controversial anti-depressant Prozac six weeks before his death. Dr.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Facebook is connecting with military-support and service organizations to offer customized suicide-prevention services for veterans, active service members and their families. For many members of military families, social media serve as a lifeline, connecting them to various supportive communities to help them cope with their specific strains and stresses. So, in conjunction with the Department of Veterans Affairs and the nonprofit organization Blue Star Families, Facebook has unveiled a literal lifeline within the site, with informational and response tools customized for service members and their families.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
It will be “nearly impossible” to trace where pastor Rick Warren's son bought the shotgun he used to take his own life last week, an Orange County Sheriff's Department official said. The gun that 27-year-old Matthew Warren used to shoot himself in his Mission Viejo home on April 5 was unregistered, had its serial numbers scratched off and was purchased online, said department spokesman Jim Amormino. A source close to the investigation confirmed it was a shotgun. “It's going to be nearly impossible to trace where he bought the weapon or who owned it previously,” Amormino told The Times.
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