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Suicide Mission

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NATIONAL
May 2, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
As Americans commemorated the anniversary of the raid that killed Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden - and endured the heavily partisan fight over whether President Obama's supporters were too effusive in their praise of his actions - another victory against terrorism was being celebrated by officials in a Brooklyn courtroom. After less than two days of deliberation, a jury on Tuesday convicted Adis Medunjanin, 28, of Queens N.Y. , of conspiracy and terrorism charges in connection with a planned suicide bombing attack on the New York City subway system in 2009.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2012 | By Phil Willon, Kate Mather and Joe Mozingo, Los Angeles Times
The alleged aspiring terrorists "liked" each other's jihadist Facebook postings. When they played paintball in Corona to prepare for Holy War, they commended each other for going full-throttle for shaheed (martyrdom) against timid opponents. One man vowed to start hiking to get to know mountain terrain, and maybe try skydiving to see how he handled fear. Yet even as he expected to go on a suicide mission once he reached the Middle East, at home in Ontario, he briefly fretted over selling his car to fund the trip.
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WORLD
October 16, 2004 | Mark Mazzetti and Ellen Barry, Times Staff Writers
The U.S. Army has launched an investigation into reports that members of an Army Reserve unit in Iraq refused to carry out a convoy supply mission this week, military officials said Friday. The incident came to light when relatives of the soldiers under investigation declared that the troops disobeyed orders to drive in the convoy because they considered it a "suicide mission."
SCIENCE
August 4, 2012 | By Nika Soon-Shiong, Los Angeles Times
Esteemed biologist E.O. Wilson famously observed that "a principle difference between human beings and ants is that whereas we send our young men to war, they send their old ladies. " And so do termites. When they become too old to help their colonies perform risky foraging tasks, elderly members of a termite species called Neocapritermes taracua provide one final service by sacrificing themselves to defend against predators, researchers reported last month in the journal Science.
NEWS
November 27, 1985 | Associated Press
A Brazilian-born woman, Hamzieh Mustafa, was killed on a suicide mission Tuesday when she drove a car packed with explosives into an Israeli-backed militia checkpoint in southern Lebanon, a leftist faction said. In a statement released in Sidon, the pro-Syrian Arab Socialist Baath Party claimed that several cars belonging to Israeli intelligence agents were blown up. The statement made no mention of casualties among the Israelis or their militia allies of the South Lebanon Army.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Outer space is about to get its first janitor satellite. Engineers from the Swiss Space Center at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne announced this week that they soon will begin work on CleanSpace One, a prototype for a line of brand-new satellites whose sole mission will be to remove defunct satellites from orbit. If the prototype is successful, the EPFL hopes to create a family of "de-orbiting" satellites so that humanity can practice in space what the Boy Scouts preach here on Earth - take only pictures (or data readings)
NEWS
July 17, 1986 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Businessman Robert J. Brown said Wednesday that he would accept appointment as the nation's first black ambassador to South Africa if President Reagan offers it to him. However, the Rev. Jesse Jackson, an early supporter of Brown, called on him to refuse the post, delivering a blow to the Administration's emerging strategy of sending the 51-year-old North Carolina public relations executive to Pretoria to relieve pressure for tough U.S. economic sanctions against the white-minority government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2012 | By Phil Willon, Kate Mather and Joe Mozingo, Los Angeles Times
The alleged aspiring terrorists "liked" each other's jihadist Facebook postings. When they played paintball in Corona to prepare for Holy War, they commended each other for going full-throttle for shaheed (martyrdom) against timid opponents. One man vowed to start hiking to get to know mountain terrain, and maybe try skydiving to see how he handled fear. Yet even as he expected to go on a suicide mission once he reached the Middle East, at home in Ontario, he briefly fretted over selling his car to fund the trip.
BOOKS
January 8, 2006 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
BY day, Zenzontli is the Keeper of the House of Darkness of the Aztex, whose future as world-conquering, shameless colonialists and slave sacrificers looks bright. They've long since triumphed over the Spanish and now in the 20th century are using Nazi-inspired techniques to enslave nations around the world. In his nightmares, however, Zenzontli is a worker at a Farmer John plant in Vernon. He works (sometimes double shifts) on the killing floor, slaughtering up to 1,800 hogs a day.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the admirably swift opening of the psychological mystery thriller "Suicide Kings," a smart B-picture with lots of A-pluses, a shrewd veteran gangster, wonderfully well-played by Christopher Walken, is kidnapped by a bunch of preppy types and whisked off to a suburban mansion. It seems that the sister of one of the kidnappers (Henry Thomas) has herself been kidnapped and is being held for a $2-million ransom. What to do but zero in on Walken, who's sure to have access to that kind of money?
NATIONAL
May 2, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
As Americans commemorated the anniversary of the raid that killed Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden - and endured the heavily partisan fight over whether President Obama's supporters were too effusive in their praise of his actions - another victory against terrorism was being celebrated by officials in a Brooklyn courtroom. After less than two days of deliberation, a jury on Tuesday convicted Adis Medunjanin, 28, of Queens N.Y. , of conspiracy and terrorism charges in connection with a planned suicide bombing attack on the New York City subway system in 2009.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Outer space is about to get its first janitor satellite. Engineers from the Swiss Space Center at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne announced this week that they soon will begin work on CleanSpace One, a prototype for a line of brand-new satellites whose sole mission will be to remove defunct satellites from orbit. If the prototype is successful, the EPFL hopes to create a family of "de-orbiting" satellites so that humanity can practice in space what the Boy Scouts preach here on Earth - take only pictures (or data readings)
WORLD
December 21, 2011 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
As hopes faded Tuesday for the rescue of 39 workers still missing after an oil rig capsized in a fierce winter storm off the east coast of Russia, the wife of one of the men called the towing of the platform through icy waters a suicide mission. The multi-ton Kolskaya oil and gas drilling platform sank Sunday in the Sea of Okhotsk about 146 miles off Sakhalin Island while being towed to its new destination in Vietnam. Fourteen crew members were rescued and 14 were found dead Sunday, officials said.
NATIONAL
September 3, 2009 | Del Quentin Wilber, Wilber writes for the Washington Post.
The 89-year-old white supremacist accused of killing a guard at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in June had planned the attack for months and was on a suicide mission, a federal prosecutor said in court Wednesday. The disclosure came during a brief hearing in Washington federal court during which the suspect, James von Brunn, spoke publicly for the first time since the June 10 shooting. "The Constitution guarantees me a speedy and fair trial," Von Brunn said in a halting voice.
WORLD
April 28, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Saudi authorities said Friday they had arrested more than 170 people, including some who had taken pilot training, in connection with a vast plot to attack oil fields and prominent national figures. The Bush administration welcomed the arrests, which a government spokesman described as showing Saudi Arabia's continued efforts "to be a good partner with us in the war on terror." In a meeting with reporters in Washington, D.C.
BOOKS
January 8, 2006 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
BY day, Zenzontli is the Keeper of the House of Darkness of the Aztex, whose future as world-conquering, shameless colonialists and slave sacrificers looks bright. They've long since triumphed over the Spanish and now in the 20th century are using Nazi-inspired techniques to enslave nations around the world. In his nightmares, however, Zenzontli is a worker at a Farmer John plant in Vernon. He works (sometimes double shifts) on the killing floor, slaughtering up to 1,800 hogs a day.
NEWS
April 21, 1999 | JULIE CART and ERIC SLATER and STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Laughing as they killed, two youths clad in dark ski masks and long black coats fired handguns at will and blithely tossed pipe bombs into a crowd of their terrified classmates Tuesday inside a suburban high school southwest of Denver, littering halls with as many as 23 bodies and wounding at least 25 others.
SCIENCE
August 4, 2012 | By Nika Soon-Shiong, Los Angeles Times
Esteemed biologist E.O. Wilson famously observed that "a principle difference between human beings and ants is that whereas we send our young men to war, they send their old ladies. " And so do termites. When they become too old to help their colonies perform risky foraging tasks, elderly members of a termite species called Neocapritermes taracua provide one final service by sacrificing themselves to defend against predators, researchers reported last month in the journal Science.
WORLD
November 14, 2005 | Ashraf Khalil, Times Staff Writer
An Iraqi woman appeared on Jordanian state television Sunday and confessed to being the fourth member of an Al Qaeda suicide bomber team that attacked three hotels here last week, killing 57 people. The woman, wearing a white head scarf and a dark denim dress, calmly identified herself as Sajida Rishawi, a 35-year-old native of the Iraqi insurgent stronghold city of Ramadi.
WORLD
October 16, 2004 | Mark Mazzetti and Ellen Barry, Times Staff Writers
The U.S. Army has launched an investigation into reports that members of an Army Reserve unit in Iraq refused to carry out a convoy supply mission this week, military officials said Friday. The incident came to light when relatives of the soldiers under investigation declared that the troops disobeyed orders to drive in the convoy because they considered it a "suicide mission."
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