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Suicide Note

NEWS
July 21, 1995 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Park Police detectives testified Thursday that interference by Bernard Nussbaum, then President Clinton's chief counsel, prevented prompt discovery of a torn-up suicide note that White House aide Vincent Foster left behind at the bottom of his briefcase.
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NEWS
September 28, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
Mohamed Atta, who is believed to be one of the masterminds of the Sept. 11 attacks, left a lengthy handwritten document in Arabic that included practical advice to the hijackers, Islamic prayers and a mission checklist, according to FBI investigators. The investigators, quoted in a story in today's Washington Post, said the writings were found in Atta's luggage, which did not make it onto his flight. The investigators have not determined whether the document was written by Atta or someone else.
NATIONAL
December 6, 2007 | Nicholas Riccardi and Stephen Braun, Times Staff Writers
Holiday shoppers scattered in terror Wednesday as a young gunman sprayed a shopping mall with gunfire, killing eight people and wounding five others before he fatally shot himself. Nebraska public safety officials and witnesses said most of the casualties were inside the Von Maur department store at the Westroads Mall on Omaha's west side. The 20-year-old assailant, who wore military-style camouflage, opened fire from the store's third floor shortly after 1 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2003 | H.G. Reza and Christine Hanley, Times Staff Writers
Conflicting accounts were given Tuesday of how a former priest died after he was confronted by Mexican police at a Mazatlan resort over the weekend. Siegfried F. Widera, who had worked as a priest in Wisconsin and Orange County and was wanted in the United States on 42 counts of child molestation, fell from a hotel balcony Sunday. U.S. authorities described it as an apparent suicide, and relatives of Widera say sheriff's investigators from El Paso told them they had found a suicide note.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1991 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Solving a 5-year-old case, law enforcement officials in Orange and San Diego counties on Friday identified the body parts of a woman killed and dismembered by her ex-husband, who confessed to the crime in a suicide note. The woman, identified as Kun Yueh Hou, 41, was killed in 1986, apparently by her ex-husband, David Michael McKay, 42, of San Diego, said San Diego County Sheriff's Department Lt. John Tenwolde. McKay killed himself in October, leaving a note that detailed the 1986 crime, police said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2011 | By Ann M. Simmons and Ruben Vives, Los Angeles Times
A 64-year-old man apparently picked up his in-laws from their home in Los Angeles on Friday, drove them to his house in Valencia and shot them to death in the driveway. He then turned the gun on himself. His wife, who was inside the home when she heard three shots, ran out and discovered the bodies of her 90-year-old mother in the front seat and her 95-year-old father in the back. Her husband was still in the driver's seat. None of the names of those involved has been released.
NEWS
March 10, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A top aide to the attorney general is found slumped over the wheel of his car, dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. His corruption-busting boss is forced to admit that his right-hand man had secretly stashed a $700,000 fortune. In a suicide note, the aide acknowledges that the money "is difficult to explain." The suicide Wednesday of Juan Manuel Izabal shocked even Mexicans accustomed to the frequent drug payoff scandals that have rocked the Justice Ministry.
NEWS
November 25, 1996 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a note written before his suicide last May, Adm. Jeremy M. Boorda, then the Navy's top officer, indicated that he was deeply concerned about recent criticism of the service and "couldn't bear to bring dishonor" to sailors over questions about whether he had improperly worn decorations given to veterans of combat.
NATIONAL
September 13, 2007 | Dan Morain, Times Staff Writer
On the day he disappeared, Norman Hsu, the disgraced fundraiser for Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton's presidential campaign, sent letters to friends that recipients viewed as a suicide note, people familiar with the letter have said. In his letter, Hsu apologized for any embarrassment he had caused recipients of his largesse. In the last four years, he has generated donations of more than $1 million for Democratic politicians across the country.
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