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Suicides Colorado

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NEWS
April 21, 1999 | JULIE CART and ERIC SLATER and STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Laughing as they killed, two youths clad in dark ski masks and long black coats fired handguns at will and blithely tossed pipe bombs into a crowd of their terrified classmates Tuesday inside a suburban high school southwest of Denver, littering halls with as many as 23 bodies and wounding at least 25 others.
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NEWS
March 7, 2001 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
However unwilling they are to embrace the title, school officials, teachers and police in Littleton are the world's reluctant experts on the gruesome topic of school shootings. Since the nation's worst school massacre nearly two years ago, the town has become one-stop shopping for those seeking to understand teenage violence. And, as ever, the town stands ready to help.
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NEWS
May 6, 2000 | From Associated Press
A Columbine High School basketball star who witnessed last year's shooting rampage--losing one of his best friends--hanged himself in his garage as a CD, set to replay continuously, blared a song with the words: "I'm too depressed to go on." It was the second suicide among friends or relatives of the Columbine High victims, shocking the community two weeks after the first anniversary of the massacre. Greg Barnes, a 17-year-old who averaged 26.
NEWS
May 6, 2000 | From Associated Press
A Columbine High School basketball star who witnessed last year's shooting rampage--losing one of his best friends--hanged himself in his garage as a CD, set to replay continuously, blared a song with the words: "I'm too depressed to go on." It was the second suicide among friends or relatives of the Columbine High victims, shocking the community two weeks after the first anniversary of the massacre. Greg Barnes, a 17-year-old who averaged 26.
NEWS
April 27, 2000 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest controversy to flare in the wake of the Columbine High School attack, families of the victims expressed outrage that a videotape of some of the carnage was released to the public Wednesday. The families were especially infuriated that the video has been set to music and that the public is being charged $25 to order it. A District Court judge ordered the material released as part of several lawsuits families have filed against the Jefferson County Sheriff's Department.
NEWS
April 21, 1999 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The "Trench Coat Mafia," as the suspects in Tuesday's shooting rampage were called by schoolmates, stood out like sore thumbs. They always wore ankle-length black trench coats, dark sunglasses and black berets. They numbered between five and 15, a collection of current students and former, always hovering on the fringes of the 1,800-student campus. They talked openly about blowing up the school, and showed off their expertise with homemade bombs.
NEWS
May 6, 1999 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The deep layers of flowers have begun to rot. The handwritten cards and banners have been shredded by the wind. The doughty teddy bears have been de-fleeced by rain and snow. Two weeks of mournful shuffling have scuffed away the once-healthy spring grass. The impromptu memorial that sprung up around Columbine High School is on its last legs.
NEWS
April 29, 1999 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials investigating the Columbine High School massacre confirmed Wednesday that five days before he opened fire on his classmates, Eric Harris was informed by the Marine Corps that he was disqualified from enlisting because of a medical condition. Harris, whose father is a retired Air Force pilot, already had talked with recruiters and done well.
NEWS
May 4, 1999 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lance Kirkland couldn't make it. He was still in the hospital, with parts of his face blown off and bullet holes in both legs and in his chest. Valeen Schnurr was out of the hospital, but had to see the doctor about the four 9-millimeter slugs still lodged in her belly. Most of the students of Columbine High, however, returned to class Monday for the first time since the April 20 massacre. So Monday was a school day--but only in the loosest sense.
NEWS
April 29, 1999 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After every school shooting, families and friends of the victims say the same thing. "I never thought it could happen here." But after last week's shooting at Columbine High School, people across America were saying it. Stunned by the coldblooded teen killers, and by their 13 helpless victims, many also were shocked by the incongruous backdrop of the spree: a prosperous suburb nestled against snow-draped mountains.
NEWS
April 27, 2000 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest controversy to flare in the wake of the Columbine High School attack, families of the victims expressed outrage that a videotape of some of the carnage was released to the public Wednesday. The families were especially infuriated that the video has been set to music and that the public is being charged $25 to order it. A District Court judge ordered the material released as part of several lawsuits families have filed against the Jefferson County Sheriff's Department.
NEWS
April 21, 2000 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a balmy spring day much like the one last year, the students and staff of Columbine High remembered their slain classmates and teacher Thursday--and attempted amid the cameras and microphones to privately mark the first anniversary of one of the nation's worst school shootings. Church bells throughout Denver tolled 13 times at 11:21 a.m., a year to the minute that distress calls began to flood from the school in suburban Littleton, Colo.
NEWS
April 16, 2000 | MARLEEN WONG, Marleen Wong is director of Los Angeles Unified School District's Mental Health Services
Nearly everyone in the United States has heard of Littleton, Colo., Jonesboro, Ark., and West Paducah, Ky. These places have entered the culture's conscience only because of an increasingly common type of tragedy linking them together--school shootings. In American culture, these high-profile occurrences have become screens upon which troubled individuals project their feelings.
NEWS
April 16, 2000 | GOHAR GALYAN, Gohar Galyan, 18, is a senior at John Marshall High School in Los Angeles and contributing writer at Los Angeles Youth
I am angry with the media for devoting so much time and coverage to Columbine. But what I am even more angry about is the way Columbine has sparked the media's attention in teens and teen issues. One year later, the press is still analyzing every insignificant detail about Columbine--the dangers of cliques, and the effects of playing violent video games, listening to punk music or watching annihilating movies. It's as if Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold represent my generation.
NEWS
April 16, 2000 | LINDA GORDON, Linda Gordon is a business teacher at Grant High School in Valley Glen and chairwoman of the United Teachers of Los Angeles' Violence Prevention School Safety Committee
As urban classroom teachers, we were not surprised that Columbine happened. We know that people expect incidents like it to happen in urban areas, but we also know that the difficulties of the teenage years are not confined to our urban schools. The most difficult thing for the classroom teacher is to have to deal every day with the kinds of frustrations that confront our students and can lead to tragedies like Columbine, such as their troubles attaining acceptance, success and respect.
NEWS
April 16, 2000 | SUSAN CARPENTER
Aldys Ramos, 14, a freshman at Hollywood High School, shared her thoughts in a conversation with The Times' Susan Carpenter. * The atrocity that took place at Columbine High School last April kind of messed with my mind a little bit. It made me wonder if I would have made it through a situation like that and what my school would have done if it had happened here. I had just started high school, so for me it was this big introduction to super violence on big campuses.
NEWS
April 30, 1999 | KIM MURPHY and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Should Steven Pfiel's parents have seen the signs of their son's murderous outburst? At 7, he allegedly set fire to a motor home. As a grammar school student in suburban Chicago, he was accused of singing death chants to a classmate. After the student complained, Pfiel admitted to police that he had vandalized the student's home with a knife and had spray-painted satanic symbols on its side. According to friends, Pfiel dropped rocks on cars from overpasses.
NEWS
March 29, 1998 | Associated Press
A stockbroker who died of a gunshot wound was the victim of a police cover-up and did not commit suicide, jurors said, awarding the man's grown children about $2.3 million in damages. The federal court jury had heard almost nine days of testimony about the May 1984 death of Lawrence Ocrant, 52. Ocrant's children, Andrew Ocrant and Sara Stump, had filed the lawsuit against their stepmother, Sueanne Ocrant, police and the city of Greenwood Village.
NEWS
April 16, 2000 | DIANA DIXON-DAVIS
Columbine and the numerous other student shooting sprees of recent years have shown that excellent, ordinary and extraordinarily bad parenting can all result in the same tragedies. That isn't to say we should stop trying to parent as consistently, fairly, sensitively and evenhandedly as we are able. Still, there are no ownership manuals when it comes to children. As parents, we can only try to do the right thing. We read Spock and attend a church, mosque or temple.
NEWS
October 28, 1999 | From Reuters
More than 550 people attended funeral services on Wednesday for a mother so distraught over her daughter's serious injuries from the Columbine High School shootings that she committed suicide. "Evil sometimes goes after the good," Pastor David Jensen of Christ Lutheran Church said at the funeral for Carla Hochhalter, 48, who shot herself in the head with a .38-caliber handgun Friday.
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