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NEWS
April 8, 1992 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a 3-year-old, Paul Lozano amazed his Mexican immigrant parents by teaching himself to read in English. Announcing that his favorite writer was Dr. Seuss, he promptly devoured every book by the author that he could find. So when Lozano's oldest sister discovered books by Dr. Seuss among his possessions after he killed himself a quarter-century later, the memory carried bitter irony.
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NEWS
December 3, 1996 | Associated Press
Attorneys and the parents of abortion clinic attacker John C. Salvi III charged Monday that prison officials are lying when they claim there were no warnings that the convicted double-murderer was suicidal. They called for independent state and federal investigations into Salvi's prison-cell death. State officials say it apparently was a suicide, but one of Salvi's lawyers said the inmate's hands and feet were tied.
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NEWS
September 1, 1987
A man who indicated he was distraught over religious persecution and re-emergence of a dreaded secret police force in his native Haiti died after setting himself on fire on the Boston Statehouse steps. Cab driver Antoine Thurel, 56, set up a hand-lettered sign and poured two to three gallons of flammable liquid over himself before setting himself afire, authorities said. "I want to offer myself in holocaust for the complete liberation of my country," the placard said.
NEWS
November 30, 1996 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John C. Salvi III, the aspiring hairdresser who killed two women and wounded five others in a New Year's weekend shooting rampage at two Boston abortion clinics in 1994, died Friday after an apparent suicide in his jail cell. The 24-year-old Salvi was discovered by guards at 6 a.m. during a routine cell check, a spokesman for the state's maximum-security prison here said. He had a plastic trash bag tied around his head. He was taken to a local hospital where he was pronounced dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1990 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
CBS has moved back by one week the date that it plans to air a TV movie based on the Charles Stuart murder-suicide case, but the move most likely will not circumvent the scheduling conflict that prompted MGM/UA to sue the network last week in an effort to block the broadcast. Whether the suit continues is now in ABC's hands.
NEWS
December 3, 1996 | Associated Press
Attorneys and the parents of abortion clinic attacker John C. Salvi III charged Monday that prison officials are lying when they claim there were no warnings that the convicted double-murderer was suicidal. They called for independent state and federal investigations into Salvi's prison-cell death. State officials say it apparently was a suicide, but one of Salvi's lawyers said the inmate's hands and feet were tied.
NEWS
January 6, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Divers searched a suburban Boston river for the handgun that police believe Charles Stuart used to kill his pregnant wife last fall. The case had triggered outrage over inner-city crime when Stuart blamed a black gunman for the shooting. WCVB-TV in Boston, quoting an unidentified family source, reported that Stuart admitted two days before his Thursday suicide that he killed his wife Oct. 23 to cash in on an insurance policy. A boy delivered prematurely by Cesarean section also died.
NEWS
January 8, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Charles Stuart Jr. bought a $250 brooch last week and was repeatedly called by a woman while he was hospitalized, leading investigators to suspect a romantic motive for him to kill his pregnant wife, wound himself and blame the attack on a mugger, the Boston Globe reported Sunday. Boston police have questioned a woman who worked with Stuart at Edward F. Kakas & Sons, a fur shop where he was the manager, the Globe said.
NEWS
January 12, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost from the start, journalists here had whispered among themselves that there were holes in Charles Stuart's bizarre tale of the mysterious black gunman who had murdered his pregnant wife and the son she was carrying. However, until Stuart's own brother brought forward startling new evidence implicating Stuart, and Stuart himself apparently committed suicide last week, none of those suspicions made it into their coverage.
NEWS
February 19, 1991 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A young man carrying a sign calling for "peace" burned himself to death with paint thinner on a lawn in the college town of Amherst on Monday in apparent protest against the war in the Persian Gulf. Horrified bystanders attempted to smother the flames with their coats and a blanket, but the young man fought them off, officials said. A policeman finally put out the flames with a fire extinguisher.
NEWS
January 16, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The bishop of the nation's largest Episcopal diocese was found dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, police and church officials in Boston said. Bishop David E. Johnson, who had announced his retirement and was to begin a sabbatical next month, committed suicide in his home, apparently on Saturday, diocesan spokesman Jay Cormier confirmed. Diocesan officials said they had no idea why Johnson killed himself.
NEWS
December 17, 1992 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family of Paul Lozano announced Wednesday that its lawsuit against psychiatrist Margaret Bean-Bayog has been resolved with a $1-million out-of-court insurance settlement. Lozano was a 28-year-old Harvard Medical School student who killed himself in April, 1991, following treatment by Bean-Bayog. His family charged that the two were involved in a sexual relationship, and that his suicide was caused by her decision to terminate treatment and the alleged affair. The 48-year-old Lexington, Mass.
NEWS
September 19, 1992 | From Associated Press
A psychiatrist accused of seducing a patient who later committed suicide submitted a resignation letter Friday, and this time officials said it was acceptable. The resignation by Dr. Margaret Bean-Bayog was "permanent and unconditional," unlike the one offered Thursday that had strings attached, said Paul Gitlin, vice chairman of the state Board of Registration in Medicine.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a 3-year-old, Paul Lozano amazed his Mexican immigrant parents by teaching himself to read in English. Announcing that his favorite writer was Dr. Seuss, he promptly devoured every book by the author that he could find. So when Lozano's oldest sister discovered books by Dr. Seuss among his possessions after he killed himself a quarter-century later, the memory carried bitter irony.
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oblivious to a steady downpour of freezing rain, scores of visitors flocked Tuesday to the site where Gregory D. Levey, 30, fatally burned himself in an apparent protest of U.S. involvement in the Persian Gulf. Many of the protesters carried candles or brought flowers to the spot on the town green where Levey, a 1984 University of Massachusetts graduate, doused himself Monday with two gallons of paint thinner, then turned himself into a human fireball. He carried a sign reading simply "Peace."
NEWS
February 19, 1991 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A young man carrying a sign calling for "peace" burned himself to death with paint thinner on a lawn in the college town of Amherst on Monday in apparent protest against the war in the Persian Gulf. Horrified bystanders attempted to smother the flames with their coats and a blanket, but the young man fought them off, officials said. A policeman finally put out the flames with a fire extinguisher.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charles Stuart's body had not even been fished out of the Boston harbor on Thursday when Colleen Mohyde received her first call about a book on the murder-suicide case that has gripped this city and much of the country. "I had hardly had time to get my coffee," the assistant editor at Little, Brown Co. said.
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY and DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A man who was considered the tragic victim of a brutal, racially tinged crime in which his wife and unborn baby were fatally wounded apparently hurled himself off a bridge to his death Thursday after learning that he had become the chief suspect in the October shooting. The drowned body of Charles Stuart was recovered from Boston Harbor on Thursday afternoon shortly after Suffolk County Dist. Atty.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1990 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
CBS has moved back by one week the date that it plans to air a TV movie based on the Charles Stuart murder-suicide case, but the move most likely will not circumvent the scheduling conflict that prompted MGM/UA to sue the network last week in an effort to block the broadcast. Whether the suit continues is now in ABC's hands.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Prosecutors want the lawyer of Charles Stuart, who apparently committed suicide after his wife's mysterious shooting death, to break attorney-client privilege, two Boston newspapers reported. Suffolk County prosecutors are seeking to force lawyer John T. Dawley to tell a grand jury what he knows of the events surrounding the October, 1989, shooting that left Carol Stuart and her prematurely born son dead.
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