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NEWS
December 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
A judge on Thursday dismissed a first-degree murder charge against the inventor of a suicide device, saying he broke no law in helping an Alzheimer's disease patient kill herself. The judge announced his decision after hearing a tape of the Oregon woman discussing her fight against the disease. "I've had enough," she said on the tape. Janet Adkins suffered from Alzheimer's disease, but she might still be alive had she not turned on Dr.
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NEWS
May 22, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A lawyer for Dr. Jack Kevorkian asked a judge to throw out his murder conviction, saying he had bad legal advice--even though Kevorkian defended himself at his trial. Lawyer Mayer Morganroth blamed Kevorkian's lawyer, David Gorosh, for "ineffective assistance of counsel." Morganroth alleged that Kevorkian acted as his own attorney out of frustration over the way Gorosh was handling the defense, the Oakland Press of Pontiac, Mich., reported.
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NEWS
October 25, 1991 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man they call "Dr. Death" has struck again--but it was unclear Thursday whether the state will strike back at him. While Michigan lawmakers still are grappling with issues raised last year by Dr. Jack Kevorkian's so-called suicide machine, the retired pathologist apparently violated a court order Wednesday by helping two more women kill themselves. Prosecutors say it may take six weeks for them to decide whether to file murder charges or contempt of court charges.
NEWS
April 14, 1999 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After nine years, five trials, 130 assisted suicides and finally a murder conviction, former pathologist Jack Kevorkian was sentenced to 10 to 25 years in prison Tuesday and, smiling sadly, led in handcuffs from the courtroom. "You said you invited yourself here to make a final stand," Oakland County Circuit Judge Jessica Cooper said sternly before meting out the sentence prosecutors had sought. "You invited yourself to the wrong forum."
NEWS
February 16, 1993 | Associated Press
Retired pathologist Jack Kevorkian helped a 70-year-old invalid who killed himself Monday by inhaling carbon monoxide. He was Kevorkian's 13th assisted suicide. Hugh Gale, a former security guard, had been disabled more than 10 years with emphysema and congestive heart disease. "He was in terrible pain," said Michael Schwartz, one of Kevorkian's attorneys. "He was on oxygen 100% of the time--could not walk, could not go out of the house."
NEWS
June 27, 1995 | From Associated Press
Dr. Jack Kevorkian has started a clinic and was present there Monday for the death of a Missouri woman with Lou Gehrig's disease. It was the 24th death he has attended. Erika Garcellano, 60, died at the clinic Kevorkian established "for the purpose of alleviating the suffering of patients," his attorney, Geoffrey Fieger, said. Garcellano had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease, a degenerative nerve disorder, for at least three years, Fieger said.
NEWS
February 29, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
Retired Dr. Jack Kevorkian was ordered Friday to stand trial for first-degree murder for helping two women commit suicide last October in a secluded state park cabin. District Judge James Sheehy dismissed a drug trafficking charge against the 63-year-old suicide machine inventor, but scheduled a March 12 arraignment on the two murder counts. Kevorkian remains free on a $10,000 personal bond. Kevorkian and his attorney, Geoffrey Fieger, said they were not surprised by Sheehy's ruling.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ronald Adkins, husband of the Portland, Ore., woman who committed suicide with the assistance of a doctor near here last week, tried to leave the area quickly on the afternoon of his wife's death and initially tried to evade police questioning, state police and local prosecutors said.
NEWS
February 5, 1993 | From Associated Press
Retired pathologist Jack Kevorkian helped two sick, elderly people kill themselves Thursday, making them the 10th and 11th patients that the self-styled suicide doctor has helped to die. Kevorkian's lawyer said that a flurry of people have been seeking his help in dying before a temporary state ban on assisted suicide takes effect March 30. Kevorkian, whose medical license has been revoked by Michigan officials, has said that he intends to ignore the law because he believes it is immoral.
NEWS
August 18, 1993 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The prosecutor in Wayne County, Mich., brought charges on Tuesday against retired pathologist Jack Kevorkian for violating a state law banning assisted suicide, while at the same time saying he believes the practice should be legal under certain conditions. Nearly two weeks ago, Kevorkian helped Thomas Hyde, a 30-year-old man suffering from Lou Gehrig's disease, kill himself in a van on an island park in the Detroit River.
NEWS
April 14, 1999 | Associated Press
Some major events in Dr. Jack Kevorkian's assisted suicide campaign: June 4, 1990: Janet Adkins, 54, of Portland, Ore., becomes the first person to use a suicide machine developed by Kevorkian. Murder charges are dropped when a judge rules Michigan has no law against assisted suicide. November 1991: Michigan suspends Kevorkian's medical license. May 2, 1994: Kevorkian acquitted of assisted suicide. March 8, 1996: Kevorkian acquitted of two assisted suicides.
NEWS
June 10, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Dr. Jack Kevorkian lashed back at the medical community for criticizing his plan to donate kidneys from a quadriplegic who committed suicide with his help. The retired pathologist said in Southfield that he wanted to focus attention on an organ shortage. But experts in the organ donation community say he's doing more to hurt their cause than help.
NEWS
June 9, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The body of a quadriplegic who killed himself with the help of Dr. Jack Kevorkian was mutilated by whoever removed the kidneys for transplantation. "They didn't remove his sweater. They just pulled it up, then cut the belly," the Detroit medical examiner said after an autopsy. He ruled Joseph Tushkowski's death a homicide, as he does all deaths in which Kevorkian is involved.
NEWS
June 8, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Dr. Jack Kevorkian offered the kidneys of a man who committed suicide with his help to be used for transplants, although it appeared doubtful the organs would be put to use. The former pathologist would not say who removed the organs or where they were being kept. The organs were removed from a 45-year-old Las Vegas man whose body was dropped off at a hospital in Pontiac the same day, Kevorkian said.
NEWS
April 2, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Police returned a "euthanasia device" and other equipment to Jack Kevorkian that was seized after an assisted suicide in February. Circuit Judge David F. Breck had given authorities until noon to bring a case against Kevorkian or return his property, which also included syringes and an oxygen tank. About 20 minutes before the deadline, police spokesman John Harris said police were returning the equipment.
NEWS
March 18, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Toward the end of his life, Jeremy Allen drifted around Cambridge, Mass., staying with friends. Now, six weeks after Dr. Jack Kevorkian helped him commit suicide and dumped the body at a hospital, he has no permanent resting place. No relatives have claimed the corpse, and Kevorkian has rejected the Oakland County coroner's demand that he pay the dead man's storage and burial costs. Allen, 52, had kidney cancer and died of an injection Feb. 4.
NEWS
June 21, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was a bright young doctor at a time when America was just beginning its post-World War II ascent, and Jack Kevorkian, University of Michigan Medical School Class of 1952, could have--should have--had it all. But he had this nagging, inexplicable fascination with the dying and the dead, a personal obsession, really, one that was all the more peculiar because it first appeared during an optimistic era of limitless possibilities and unquestioning faith in the resiliency of American life.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Kevorkian had his day in court on Wednesday, comparing his actions in assisting the suicide of a terminally ill 30-year-old man to the civil disobedience of Mahatma Gandhi--and the martyred Gandhi, he added, "got what I did."
NEWS
February 27, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A paralyzed university student who won the right to leave a hospital and consult with Dr. Jack Kevorkian committed suicide hours later with his help, Kevorkian's lawyer, Geoffrey Fieger, said. Roosevelt Dawson, 21, an Oakland University student from Southfield, had been unable to use his arms and legs and had depended on a ventilator to breathe since a viral infection attacked his spinal cord 13 months ago. Dawson is the youngest person known to have committed suicide with Kevorkian's help.
NEWS
January 1, 1998 | Times Wire Services
An autopsy showed that a Pennsylvania man who apparently committed suicide in the presence of retired pathologist Jack Kevorkian was not in danger of dying from bladder cancer, and a relative said the man had been receiving psychiatric treatment since age 3. But Kevorkian on Wednesday defended his decision to help Franz-Johann Long, 53, die.
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