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Suicides Nevada

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The judge's verdict is all that remains in the multimillion-dollar product-liability suit against the British rock group Judas Priest after final arguments were concluded Friday in a Reno courtroom. Washoe District Judge Jerry Carr Whitehead said he expects to issue his ruling by Friday. The unprecedented product-liability lawsuit, which charges the heavy-metal quintet with causing the suicide attempts of two Sparks, Nev., youths in 1985, has drawn international attention.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1999 | BRIAN LOWRY
Before this week, you probably never gave much thought to David Strickland, assuming you were aware of him at all. Small wonder, since the same can largely be said of the media. Strickland was one of the ensemble on "Suddenly Susan," a modestly rated comedy series drifting with little fanfare through its third season on NBC.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1999 | BRIAN LOWRY
Before this week, you probably never gave much thought to David Strickland, assuming you were aware of him at all. Small wonder, since the same can largely be said of the media. Strickland was one of the ensemble on "Suddenly Susan," a modestly rated comedy series drifting with little fanfare through its third season on NBC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1999 | From Associated Press
Actor David Strickland, who played a music critic on the NBC sitcom "Suddenly Susan," was found dead Monday morning, hanging from a bedsheet that he had strung from a ceiling beam, police said. Strickland, 28, was found by a worker at the Oasis Motel, said police spokesman Steve Meriwether. A chair was next to his body, and an empty box of beer was seen in the room. It was not clear how long he had been hanging.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aunetta Roberson and Phyllis Vance lived in the same suburb for years. Their husbands frequented the same casinos. Their sons attended--and dropped out of--the same school. Outside of a few phone calls related to academic or legal problems their sons encountered, however, the women's lives rarely crossed. About the only thing they had in common was their mutual hatred for the loud heavy-metal music that their sons played for hours in the sons' rooms. Yet on Dec.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friday's Judas Priest verdict--which absolved the British heavy metal quintet and their record company, CBS Records, from responsibility for the suicide attempts of two Nevada youths--is being perceived by the music industry as a Pyrrhic victory at best. Industry observers expressed concerns that the costly legal battle preceding the ruling may have intensified the debate over artistic expression.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1990
I would like to thank The Times for its article on our neonatal tortoise research at California State University, Dominguez Hills. Unfortunately, one statement, "The tortoises under study . . . eventually will be set free in the desert," does need correction. An early draft of our study plan (provided to The Times) did make reference to a now-abandoned reintroduction project. In fact, no captive tortoises will be released into natural habitats.
NEWS
November 27, 1996 | From Associated Press
A former New Jersey prosecutor who jumped bail more than a week ago rather than go to prison shot himself to death Tuesday in a casino hotel room after federal marshals kicked in the door. Nicholas Bissell, who was convicted of skimming $146,000 from his business to live a life of gambling and luxury, stuck a gun in his mouth and fired as officers tried to talk him into surrendering, marshals said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1990 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
For television producers and feature filmmakers, implications of the Judas Priest decision are uncertain. On the one hand, it's easier to prove whether a subliminal message has been inserted into a movie or television program than a record, because the film or tape can be run at a slow speed to see if the message appears.
NEWS
December 29, 1994 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The present only seems to be bright in the garish glow of the Las Vegas Strip, and the future really has Chris Webster worried. Curfew started for local teen-agers an hour ago, but they are just beginning to appear, cruising by Circus Circus casino in shiny cars with blaring music, hanging out with friends and laughing at tourists with active cameras. "See all the cars going up and down the strip?" asks a cold and bored Webster, 18, as he loiters with friends outside McDonald's.
NEWS
November 27, 1996 | From Associated Press
A former New Jersey prosecutor who jumped bail more than a week ago rather than go to prison shot himself to death Tuesday in a casino hotel room after federal marshals kicked in the door. Nicholas Bissell, who was convicted of skimming $146,000 from his business to live a life of gambling and luxury, stuck a gun in his mouth and fired as officers tried to talk him into surrendering, marshals said.
NEWS
December 29, 1994 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The present only seems to be bright in the garish glow of the Las Vegas Strip, and the future really has Chris Webster worried. Curfew started for local teen-agers an hour ago, but they are just beginning to appear, cruising by Circus Circus casino in shiny cars with blaring music, hanging out with friends and laughing at tourists with active cameras. "See all the cars going up and down the strip?" asks a cold and bored Webster, 18, as he loiters with friends outside McDonald's.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1992 | JEFF KRAMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A probate judge on Wednesday ordered the destruction of a suicide victim's frozen sperm, but gave his stunned and sobbing lover 60 days to appeal the ruling to a higher court. The decision set the stage for a precedent-setting appellate showdown over the disposition of a dozen vials of sperm willed by William Kane of Malibu to his lover, Deborah Hecht, before his October, 1991, suicide.
NEWS
October 12, 1990 | Times Wire Services
A man whose quadriplegic son ended his life a week ago because he wanted to die before his ailing father, died Thursday after a short battle with lung cancer, his attorney said. Robert Bergstedt, like his son Kenneth, died before the Nevada Supreme Court issued a ruling on Kenneth Bergstedt's legal request for the right to end his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1990
I would like to thank The Times for its article on our neonatal tortoise research at California State University, Dominguez Hills. Unfortunately, one statement, "The tortoises under study . . . eventually will be set free in the desert," does need correction. An early draft of our study plan (provided to The Times) did make reference to a now-abandoned reintroduction project. In fact, no captive tortoises will be released into natural habitats.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1990 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
For television producers and feature filmmakers, implications of the Judas Priest decision are uncertain. On the one hand, it's easier to prove whether a subliminal message has been inserted into a movie or television program than a record, because the film or tape can be run at a slow speed to see if the message appears.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS
How do you prove something exists if it cannot be seen or heard? That's the challenge facing attorneys Timothy Post, Ken McKenna and Vivian Lynch. They represent the families of two Sparks youths, Raymond Belknap, 18, and James Vance, 20, who shot themselves on Dec. 23, 1985, after an afternoon of drinking beer, smoking pot and listening to the music of Judas Priest. Belknap died instantly. Vance survived the suicide attempt but died three years later, allegedly due to related complications.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1990 | From United Press International
A young man who entered into a suicide pact after listening to hours of the albums of the British rock group Judas Priest believed the music influenced his actions, a psychiatrist testified Friday. Dr. Bruce Tanenbaum said that James Vance "didn't care if he ever got a dime from the lawsuit" against Judas Priest and CBS Records.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two young men did not kill themselves because they heard alleged subliminal messages in the heavy metal music of Judas Priest, a judge in Reno, Nev., ruled on Friday. Judas Priest vocalist Rob Halford called the ruling a victory for rock 'n' roll. "It's a great day for Judas Priest. It's a great day for heavy metal and artistic expression," Halford said in a telephone interview from Mexico, where he is vacationing.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friday's Judas Priest verdict--which absolved the British heavy metal quintet and their record company, CBS Records, from responsibility for the suicide attempts of two Nevada youths--is being perceived by the music industry as a Pyrrhic victory at best. Industry observers expressed concerns that the costly legal battle preceding the ruling may have intensified the debate over artistic expression.
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