Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSuicides Oregon
IN THE NEWS

Suicides Oregon

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 23, 1991 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the early afternoon of the day she killed herself, Ann Wickett Humphry, 49-year-old author and once-vocal right-to-die activist, made a final call to her friend Julie Horvath in Los Angeles. "She said she was checking out," recalls Horvath, who had just returned from visiting Windfall Farm, Humphry's 50-acre ranch 25 miles north of Eugene. "I said, 'Let me come up.' She said, 'No.' I said, 'I love you. Come down here and I will support you. I will help you.'
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 19, 1998 | From Associated Press
Eight people have died in Oregon with help from doctors since the nation's only assisted-suicide law took effect last fall, state officials announced Tuesday. The Oregon Health Division on Tuesday released its first figures on deaths under the law, which was initially approved by Oregon voters in 1994 and reaffirmed at the ballot box last November. The law allows a doctor to prescribe a lethal dose of medication to hasten the death of a terminally ill patient.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 28, 1994 | From Associated Press
A judge blocked Oregon from putting its first-in-the-nation assisted suicide law into effect Tuesday until a court can decide if the voter-approved measure is constitutional. Measure 16, narrowly approved in November, allows a patient to request a lethal dose of drugs if at least two doctors determine the person has less than six months to live. "Surely, the first assisted suicide law in this country deserves a considered, thoughtful constitutional analysis," U.S.
NEWS
November 4, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A man suspected in bombings minutes apart at two packed coffee shops in Astoria shot and killed himself in the confusion as panicked diners fled. One person was treated for cuts caused by flying glass. Police dispatcher Dick Lang said there was no confirmation as to what kind of bombs they were. Police said they had not determined the man's identity and would not discuss how he died, but said they believed he was responsible for the bombings.
NEWS
November 4, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A man suspected in bombings minutes apart at two packed coffee shops in Astoria shot and killed himself in the confusion as panicked diners fled. One person was treated for cuts caused by flying glass. Police dispatcher Dick Lang said there was no confirmation as to what kind of bombs they were. Police said they had not determined the man's identity and would not discuss how he died, but said they believed he was responsible for the bombings.
NEWS
March 26, 1998 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An elderly woman whose breast cancer left her housebound and unable to easily breathe swallowed a fatal dose of barbiturates and died in her sleep, becoming the first known person to utilize Oregon's landmark doctor-assisted suicide law, advocates announced Wednesday.
NEWS
October 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A co-founder of the Hemlock Society right-to-die group was found dead in central Oregon, and her former husband said he believed she killed herself. An autopsy was scheduled for Ann Wickett Humphry, 49. She went through a difficult divorce last year and had battled breast cancer. Ex-husband Derek Humphry, with whom she founded the society, said the malignancy had been removed and that he was unaware of any recurrence of the cancer. But he said she had been depressed.
NEWS
December 8, 1994 | From Associated Press
A law that would have made Oregon the first government in the nation to allow doctor-assisted suicides for the terminally ill was blocked by a federal judge Wednesday, a day before it was to take effect. U.S. District Judge Michael Hogan in Eugene issued a temporary restraining order, saying he wanted to hear arguments on whether the law is constitutional. He scheduled a Dec. 19 hearing. The state's voters approved Measure 16 on Nov. 8.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1994 | From Associated Press
In a rare confluence of opinion, faith groups from Buddhists to Baptists have united behind the Roman Catholic Church to fight an assisted suicide measure on Oregon's general election ballot. Supporters of the measure have portrayed the opposition as Catholics who are out of touch with the rest of society. The Catholic Church has raised three-quarters of the $1 million being used against Measure 16, much of it from collections during Sunday services.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | From Associated Press
Oregon has become the only place in the nation that will let doctors hasten death for the terminally ill. Measure 16 on Tuesday's ballot passed 52% to 48% Thursday. Not all the absentee ballots were counted, but both sides said they do not expect the margin to change when the tally is completed today. Measure 16 will allow a patient with six months to live to ask a doctor to prescribe a lethal dose of drugs to end unbearable suffering.
NEWS
December 28, 1994 | From Associated Press
A judge blocked Oregon from putting its first-in-the-nation assisted suicide law into effect Tuesday until a court can decide if the voter-approved measure is constitutional. Measure 16, narrowly approved in November, allows a patient to request a lethal dose of drugs if at least two doctors determine the person has less than six months to live. "Surely, the first assisted suicide law in this country deserves a considered, thoughtful constitutional analysis," U.S.
NEWS
December 8, 1994 | From Associated Press
A law that would have made Oregon the first government in the nation to allow doctor-assisted suicides for the terminally ill was blocked by a federal judge Wednesday, a day before it was to take effect. U.S. District Judge Michael Hogan in Eugene issued a temporary restraining order, saying he wanted to hear arguments on whether the law is constitutional. He scheduled a Dec. 19 hearing. The state's voters approved Measure 16 on Nov. 8.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | From Associated Press
Oregon has become the only place in the nation that will let doctors hasten death for the terminally ill. Measure 16 on Tuesday's ballot passed 52% to 48% Thursday. Not all the absentee ballots were counted, but both sides said they do not expect the margin to change when the tally is completed today. Measure 16 will allow a patient with six months to live to ask a doctor to prescribe a lethal dose of drugs to end unbearable suffering.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1994 | From Associated Press
In a rare confluence of opinion, faith groups from Buddhists to Baptists have united behind the Roman Catholic Church to fight an assisted suicide measure on Oregon's general election ballot. Supporters of the measure have portrayed the opposition as Catholics who are out of touch with the rest of society. The Catholic Church has raised three-quarters of the $1 million being used against Measure 16, much of it from collections during Sunday services.
NEWS
October 23, 1991 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the early afternoon of the day she killed herself, Ann Wickett Humphry, 49-year-old author and once-vocal right-to-die activist, made a final call to her friend Julie Horvath in Los Angeles. "She said she was checking out," recalls Horvath, who had just returned from visiting Windfall Farm, Humphry's 50-acre ranch 25 miles north of Eugene. "I said, 'Let me come up.' She said, 'No.' I said, 'I love you. Come down here and I will support you. I will help you.'
NEWS
October 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A co-founder of the Hemlock Society right-to-die group was found dead in central Oregon, and her former husband said he believed she killed herself. An autopsy was scheduled for Ann Wickett Humphry, 49. She went through a difficult divorce last year and had battled breast cancer. Ex-husband Derek Humphry, with whom she founded the society, said the malignancy had been removed and that he was unaware of any recurrence of the cancer. But he said she had been depressed.
NEWS
August 7, 1997 | From Reuters
The American Bar Assn. refused Wednesday to take a stand on doctor-assisted suicide, voting that the matter be left to state legislatures. In adopting the innocuous proposal during the association's annual meeting, the group shied away from becoming embroiled in a controversial issue that some members warned could result in a drop in membership and hurt the bar's public image.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|