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NEWS
July 21, 1993 | From Associated Press
Vince Foster, President Clinton's deputy legal counsel, was found dead Tuesday night in a roadside park from an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound, White House officials said. U.S. Park Police said Foster's body was found at Ft. Marcy, a small Civil War park overlooking the Potomac River in suburban Virginia outside the nation's capital.
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NEWS
May 16, 2000 | Reuters
The 17-year-old son of Democratic Rep. Bart Stupak of Michigan died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound during the weekend, Stupak's office said Monday. Bart Stupak Jr. died early Sunday morning. The family released no other details. The elder Stupak, a former state trooper and policeman, was a longtime backer of the National Rifle Assn. But he broke with the gun lobby on one crucial vote last year--a House bill to require up to three-day background checks at gun shows.
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NEWS
September 13, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secret Service officials suggested Monday that a dramatic suicide, rather than an assassination attempt, was the most likely motivation behind the crash on the White House South Lawn of a light plane piloted by Frank Eugene Corder, a 38-year-old truck driver with a history of alcohol and drug problems. The plane's dive onto the White House South Lawn at 1:49 a.m.
NEWS
March 31, 1998 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court dealt a setback Monday to independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr by agreeing to hear a lawyer's challenge to one of Starr's many subpoenas for private notes. The court said it will rule early next year on whether a lawyer who consulted with former Clinton aide Vincent Foster just nine days before Foster's suicide can keep their conversation confidential.
NEWS
June 10, 1995 | From Associated Press
Nationally known forensic scientist Henry C. Lee is helping Whitewater prosecutors by reviewing the 1993 death of White House lawyer Vincent Foster. Lee, whose expertise has been sought in prominent trials, such as the O.J. Simpson case, said Friday that he agreed to review the prosecutors' investigatory reports about Foster's July, 1993, death to determine if they support the original finding of suicide.
NEWS
September 13, 1994 | EDWIN CHEN
The tree struck by the light plane that crashed outside the White House is the oldest on the grounds of the Executive Mansion--a towering southern magnolia planted more than 150 years ago by President Andrew Jackson as a memorial to his wife. She died just before he took office. The plane apparently hit the ground and then struck the tree, severing a limb but doing no further damage.
NEWS
March 29, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Keeping the investigation of Vincent Foster's death open, Whitewater prosecutors are bringing in an assistant U.S. attorney, Steve Parker of Tennessee, to review the evidence. The protege of deputy Whitewater prosecutor Hickman Ewing will join the office that launched an investigation in the fall of 1994 into how the deputy White House counsel died. Two previous investigations concluded that Foster committed suicide, but independent counsel Kenneth W.
NEWS
August 10, 1995 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Denying any wrongdoing, former White House Counsel Bernard Nussbaum said Wednesday that he was right to block investigators' access to the files of the late Vincent Foster after his suicide, saying that it was his legal duty to protect the privacy of his former deputy as well as that of the President and First Lady.
NEWS
January 7, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Whitewater prosecutors are reopening some aspects of their investigation of Vincent Foster's suicide, summoning three rescue workers before a federal grand jury to testify about the scene of the White House lawyer's death in July, 1993. Two of the witnesses had said that they saw a briefcase in Foster's parked car where the suicide occurred, according to FBI interview documents. U.S. Park Police, who investigated Foster's death, recovered no briefcase from the car. Park Police Maj.
NEWS
November 12, 1995 | RONALD J. OSTROW and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The keening voices of doubt fill the nightly airwaves, bombard news organizations and echo through countless chat rooms along the information highway. Why was the fatal bullet never found? Why did the .38-caliber revolver dangling from the dead man's right hand bear no fingerprints--neither his nor anyone else's? Wasn't it odd, given the violent nature of his death, that both arms were extended neatly at his sides?
NEWS
February 19, 1998 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Does the attorney-client privilege of confidentiality die when the client dies? Independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr, who is seeking notes from an attorney consulted by the late Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster, says that it does.
NEWS
October 11, 1997 | RONALD J. OSTROW and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster, depressed in the days shortly before his 1993 suicide, cried at dinner with his wife, sought legal advice from attorneys and told his mother that he was unhappy because work was "a grind." That poignant portrait of Foster is sketched in a newly issued report by independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr, who concluded that the longtime friend of Bill and Hillary Rodham Clinton took his own life.
NEWS
July 16, 1997 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr announced Tuesday that he has concluded that White House Deputy Counsel Vincent Foster committed suicide in 1993, officially resolving a controversy over a death that some opponents of President Clinton had labeled a murder. In a forceful statement, Starr said his findings were "based on investigation, analysis and review of the evidence by experts and experienced investigators and prosecutors."
NEWS
February 23, 1997 | JACK NELSON, CHIEF WASHINGTON CORRESPONDENT
Whitewater independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr has completed a voluminous report that, sources say, refutes claims by right-wing organizations that presidential aide Vincent Foster was the victim of a murder and that President Clinton and his wife, Hillary, tried to cover it up. Running to more than 100 pages, the report rests on an exhaustive inquiry into the events surrounding Foster's July 1993 death by handgun and was completed only recently, sources said.
NEWS
November 12, 1996 | Associated Press
A witness in the Vincent Foster case is suing the government for $1.5 million, alleging two FBI agents and 26 other people conspired to discourage him from testifying about what he saw on the day the deputy White House counsel died. Patrick Knowlton says the FBI falsified information he gave them and that he was harassed by people who followed him after his account in the Foster case became public. The lawsuit, filed Oct. 25 in U.S.
NEWS
July 25, 1996
The media inquiry that led to the suicide of Chief of Naval Operations Jeremy M. "Mike" Boorda has claimed another victim. Roger Charles, the reporter who broke the story on Boorda's right to wear certain combat decorations, has been fired in the wake of a backlash against his employer, the National Security News Service. The reason, his bosses said, is that donations to the nonprofit group have dropped since the Boorda tragedy in May, leaving the news service with a $60,000 deficit.
NEWS
July 16, 1997 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr announced Tuesday that he has concluded that White House Deputy Counsel Vincent Foster committed suicide in 1993, officially resolving a controversy over a death that some opponents of President Clinton had labeled a murder. In a forceful statement, Starr said his findings were "based on investigation, analysis and review of the evidence by experts and experienced investigators and prosecutors."
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | from Associated Press
The note White House lawyer Vincent Foster wrote before his apparent suicide resembled the outline of a resignation letter and mentioned specific job frustrations, an Administration official said Saturday. In the note, Foster discussed embarrassment over the firings of White House travel office workers and his distress about critical editorials in the Wall Street Journal, according to U.S. News and World Report. Foster died July 20 of an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound.
NEWS
May 22, 1996 | From Associated Press
Adm. Jeremy Michael Boorda was eulogized Tuesday by President Clinton as a military leader who had a "deep sense of honor which no person should ever question." Boorda, the Navy's top officer, killed himself Thursday amid questions about whether he had earned the right to wear certain combat decorations on his uniform. During a memorial service at Washington National Cathedral, Clinton did not mention Boorda's suicide.
NEWS
May 20, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Adm. Jeremy Michael Boorda was buried in the shadow of the Pentagon, where he had worked since April 1994 as the Navy's top officer. On a sweltering spring afternoon, family members held a private ceremony at the grave in Arlington National Cemetery a few hundred yards from the Pentagon. Boorda, 56, chief of naval operations, committed suicide after learning about a media inquiry into whether he had improperly worn decorations. "Adm.
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