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January 24, 2010 | By Adam Tschorn >>>
On the CBS sitcom "How I Met Your Mother," Neil Patrick Harris plays perhaps the most style-obsessed male sitcom character since Alex P. Keaton. Hardly ever seen sans suit since the show debuted in 2005, Barney Stinson uses his wardrobe as a weapon for womanizing. It's a suit of armor and a security blanket rolled into one. It's become such a trademark of Harris' character that when the show's 100th episode, "Girls vs. Suits," found him confronted with the choice of a beautiful bartender or his signature suits, the result was a full-blown, street-filling, suit-sporting song-and-dance number -- favoring the suit.
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BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
Families of children with disabilities have sued Walt Disney Co. theme parks and resorts in Anaheim and Orlando, Fla., over a new policy allowing guests with disabilities quick access to rides and attractions. The suit, filed last week in U.S. District Court for the Central District of California, alleges that the policy put in place in October is intended to discourage guests with disabilities from visiting the parks. Disney dismissed those claims. Before October, visitors with disabilities and their family members were given a card that allowed them to go directly onto rides, skipping long lines.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2012 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
The Trinity Broadcasting Network, which bills itself as the world's largest Christian network, is embroiled in a legal battle involving allegations of massive financial fraud and lavish spending, including the purchase of a $100,000 motor home for family dogs. Brittany Koper, a former high-ranking TBN official and the granddaughter of its co-founder, Paul Crouch Sr., was fired by the network in September after discovering "illegal financial schemes" amounting to tens of millions of dollars, according to a lawsuit filed in Orange County Superior Court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014
Anthony Wardlaw was fresh out of foster care three years ago when he went on general relief, Los Angeles County's $221-a-month welfare program for the destitute. When he tried to use the money to buy his mother a hamburger, his government debit card didn't work. And he had no idea why. According to a $7.9-million settlement agreement announced Tuesday, Wardlaw was one of thousands of people who were knocked off the welfare rolls without proper notice when applications swelled during the Great Recession.
SPORTS
July 22, 2009 | Kurt Streeter
Former UCLA basketball star Ed O'Bannon was named Tuesday as the lead plaintiff in a lawsuit alleging former college football and basketball players are illegally denied a share of profits made by the NCAA through the sale of television and online reruns, video games, jerseys and other paraphernalia. "I've always been one to wonder why former student athletes weren't compensated for their games on television," said O'Bannon, who helped lead UCLA to an NCAA championship in 1995.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Apparently when it comes to selling satellite TV, anything goes. In a lawsuit filed in federal court in Sacramento, satellite broadcaster DirecTV accuses Dish One, a retailer majority-owned by rival Dish Network, of using all sorts of duplicitous and illegal acts including pretending to be DirecTV representatives in an effort to poach subscribers, primarily senior citizens. Dish One has "engaged in marketing efforts to target existing DirecTV customers and convince those customers to switch to Dish Network based on false and misleading representations," DirecTV said in the suit, which makes allegations of trademark infringement, false advertising, fraud and slander.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014 | By Martha Groves
Some Venice activists have ended their years-long legal battle to restrict overnight parking in the coastal community, which has struggled over how to deal with the divisive issue of people living in campers and cars.   After Los Angeles Councilman Mike Bonin's office declined to offer any support for the effort, an attorney representing the Venice Stakeholders Assn. said the group dropped a suit seeking  “overnight parking districts” in areas near the beach.   The case was filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court in 2009, when the California Coastal Commission first denied the city's application for restricted parking on the grounds that it would impede public access to Venice Beach between 2 a.m. and 5 a.m. The Venice Stakeholders Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
A breach-of-contract suit filed against comedian Adam Carolla by three former business associates suggests that the new media world may not be all that different from old Hollywood. Producer Donny Misraje -- who claims to have persuaded the radio and television personality and longtime friend to use podcasts to reach his listeners -- filed suit against Carolla on Thursday in Superior Court in Los Angeles.  Misraje is joined in the suit by his wife, Kathee Schneider-Misraje, a creative director, and Sandy Ganz, who helped rebuild and maintain websites for the company's podcasts and co-hosted a show, "CarCast," with Carolla.  The trio allege Carolla failed to distribute their share of the profits in the podcasting business -- or even provide an accurate accounting of the books -- in violation of an oral partnership agreement.
NEWS
June 15, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro
Antiwar Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio) filed suit in federal court Wednesday seeking to halt the U.S. military action in Libya, saying it is unconstitutional. Kucinich and Republican Rep. Walter Jones of North Carolina, another longtime war critic, led a bipartisan group of lawmakers in the latest challenge to the White House's authority to conduct the campaign without seeking congressional approval under the War Powers Act. Photos: U.S., allies strike targets in Libya "With regard to the war in Libya, we believe that the law was violated," Kucinich said.
SPORTS
May 17, 2012 | By Sam Farmer
The NFL punched, and now one of the New Orleans Saints has counterpunched. Saints linebacker Jonathan Vilma is suing NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell for defamation, claiming the executive lied about him when making statements about the Saints' alleged bounty program. The suit was filed Thursday in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana. Vilma, a team captain, is accused of being one of the leaders of the program, and twice offering teammates $10,000 to knock quarterbacks out of playoff games - first Arizona's Kurt Warner, then Minnesota's Brett Favre.
SPORTS
April 2, 2014 | By Mike Bresnahan
SACRAMENTO - Pau Gasol's vertigo came back with a vengeance and Chris Kaman's right calf wouldn't cooperate. It was almost time for assistant coaches Kurt Rambis and Mark Madsen to suit up for the Lakers. "Only if they let me wear the short shorts," Rambis said beforehand and, yeah, that wasn't really possible. So the Lakers plowed ahead with nine players and lost to the equally awful Sacramento Kings, 107-102, on Wednesday at Sleep Train Arena. The Lakers (25-50)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Victoria Kim
After Maria de Jesus Arroyo was pronounced dead of cardiac arrest in the summer of 2010, her husband and children said their goodbyes and left her in the hands of hospital staff. When they saw her next at the funeral, her nose was broken and she had gashes and bruises on her face - injuries too severe to be covered up, despite the morticians' best efforts. The outraged family sued the hospital, White Memorial Medical Center in Boyle Heights, believing the hospital had mishandled the 80-year-old woman's body.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Michael Robertson put the bag of chemicals in an inside pocket of his sport coat, the pump in the other. He snaked the tubes between the buttons of his shirt to the port in his chest. He adjusted his tie to cover them. Then he sat down in a cavernous room in the White House complex and pulled his chair close to the table, hiding the bulges. Robertson, an aide to President Obama, was meeting with top officials from federal agencies working to implement the Affordable Care Act. He was also in treatment for stage IV colorectal cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
After seven years of guarding inmates in Los Angeles County jails, Sheriff's Deputy Guadalupe Lopez was transferred to the East L.A. Station to continue her career working in patrol. It was there, she says in a lawsuit filed this week, that she encountered a rogue group of deputies called the "Banditos. " The Banditos, she says, sport matching tattoos and try to coerce female deputy patrol trainees like her into performing sexual favors. In the 19-page lawsuit, Lopez contends that she was assigned a training officer who was known as the "Godfather" and was a leader of the group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- Oakland has reached a $4.5-million settlement with a Marine veteran who suffered brain damage when a police officer shot him with a beanbag projectile during an Occupy Oakland protest, the city announced Friday. Scott Olsen, 26, who served two tours in Iraq,  suffered a fractured skull and traumatic brain injury on Oct. 25, 2011, when Oakland police tried to disperse a crowd near City Hall. Olsen said he was standing still and behaving peacefully when he was struck.
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | By Susan Denley
If you think Kermit the Frog and his nemesis Constantine look pretty dapper in Disney's  "Muppets Most Wanted," you're right. The Muppets were dressed in part by Brooks Brothers -- right along with human costars Ricky Gervais, Ty Burrell and Stanley Tucci, among others. Brooks, whose name is synonymous with classic men's clothing, collaborated with costume designer Rahel Afiley to provide more than 200 items for male cast members including the two green ones. Among other things, the frogs were outfitted with bespoke morning suits for one pivotal scene.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2013 | By Catherine Saillant
A lawsuit alleging that City Attorney-elect Mike Feuer manipulated ethics laws to financially benefit his campaign has been thrown out of court. The action had been filed by a supporter of Feuer's rival, Carmen Trutanich. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Richard Rico found meritless the claims by plaintiff Laura Lake that Feuer intentionally delayed paying campaign consultant John Shallman in order to qualify for taxpayer-provided matching funds. The suit, filed in the midst of the campaign , named both Feuer and Shallman as defendants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2013 | By Paloma Esquivel
An Orange County ambulance company has paid $3.05 million to settle a lawsuit alleging that it billed Medicare and other federal healthcare programs to transport patients who didn't need an ambulance, federal prosecutors said. The suit was filed on behalf of the United States by two former employees of Lynch Ambulance, which is based in Anaheim, under whistle-blower provisions of the federal False Claims Act, according to a written statement by the U.S. attorney's Central District of California office.
HEALTH
March 21, 2014 | By Jessica Ogilvie
Onstage at the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall in Costa Mesa, an older couple assumes a ballroom dance position. A tango begins, and the man, wearing a porkpie hat and suit, leads. The woman, wearing a floral dress, follows gracefully. Judging by the ease and fluidity of their movements, one would never know that Nancy Dufault, 72, has Parkinson's disease. When she is dancing, moving in time with her husband, Bob, she experiences a brief respite from symptoms. "She asked me to write a tango," says Mike Garson, a classically trained pianist who played with David Bowie for nearly 40 years.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
A federal judge has ruled that Kansas and Arizona should be allowed to require voters to provide evidence of U.S. citizenship, in a case closely watched by both sides dealing with the question of voter eligibility. U.S. District Judge Eric Melgren in Wichita, Kan., ruled that the U.S. Election Assistance Commission had no legal authority to deny requests from the two states to add the citizenship requirement. In the ruling, released Wednesday, he ordered the commission to revise the national form immediately.
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