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NEWS
August 4, 1994 | FRANK DeCARO, NEWSDAY
Sporting a silver hoop in his newly pierced brow--a misplaced bit of decadence on a boyishly handsome face--John Bartlett asked the question, "Who is more glamorous--Forrest Gump or Ivana Trump?" He answered with a collection that, once again, confirmed his status as the shining-est light of the New York menswear shows.
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BUSINESS
July 21, 1999 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Guess Inc. has agreed to pay up to $1 million to settle a 1996 lawsuit alleging that thousands of Los Angeles garment workers were underpaid by contractors working for the jeans giant. The corporation admitted no wrongdoing under the settlement announced Tuesday.
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SPORTS
October 23, 1988 | THOMAS BONK, Times Staff Writer
It is nearly November, which can mean only that the Bowl season is in full swing. Think of it as a kind of hunting season. On a warm Saturday at Arizona Stadium with the rugged Catalina Mountains glowering in the distance, the bowl hunters assembled. They had the football teams from UCLA and Arizona in their sights. What these bowl representatives saw was a 24-3 Bruin victory over the Wildcats. What the Bruins and the Wildcats saw was a group of men in brightly colored sports coats.
NEWS
August 4, 1994 | FRANK DeCARO, NEWSDAY
Sporting a silver hoop in his newly pierced brow--a misplaced bit of decadence on a boyishly handsome face--John Bartlett asked the question, "Who is more glamorous--Forrest Gump or Ivana Trump?" He answered with a collection that, once again, confirmed his status as the shining-est light of the New York menswear shows.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1989 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, Times Staff Writer
Two Orange County women stood outside a Beverly Hills department store Tuesday and announced what they called a major victory for American women: Saks Fifth Avenue agreed to reduce some clothing alteration charges for women. Muriel K. Mabry of Anaheim Hills and Lorie Anderson of Mission Viejo said they had forced the retailer to reverse "sex discrimination practices" that resulted in women being charged more than men for clothing alterations.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1999 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Guess Inc. has agreed to pay up to $1 million to settle a 1996 lawsuit alleging that thousands of Los Angeles garment workers were underpaid by contractors working for the jeans giant. The corporation admitted no wrongdoing under the settlement announced Tuesday.
IMAGE
July 29, 2012 | By Deidre Crawford
As swimmers go for the gold at the London Olympics, swimwear companies are ready to sell the latest Olympic-themed swimsuits back home. Recreational and competitive swimmers alike can benefit from the same technologies swimsuit manufacturers are using to help the likes of Michael Phelps, Ryan Lochte, Natalie Coughlin (all sporting Speedos), and Matt Grevers, Nick Thoman, Ricky Berens, Ariana Kukors and Amanda Weir (all in Tyr). The controversial suits of the 2008 Olympics, which prompted accusations of "technological doping," are no longer allowed.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1989 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, Times Staff Writer
Two Orange County women stood outside a Beverly Hills department store Tuesday and announced what they called a major victory for American women: Saks Fifth Avenue agreed to reduce some clothing alteration charges for women. Muriel K. Mabry of Anaheim Hills and Lorie Anderson of Mission Viejo said they had forced the retailer to reverse "sex discrimination practices" that resulted in women being charged more than men for clothing alterations.
SPORTS
October 23, 1988 | THOMAS BONK, Times Staff Writer
It is nearly November, which can mean only that the Bowl season is in full swing. Think of it as a kind of hunting season. On a warm Saturday at Arizona Stadium with the rugged Catalina Mountains glowering in the distance, the bowl hunters assembled. They had the football teams from UCLA and Arizona in their sights. What these bowl representatives saw was a 24-3 Bruin victory over the Wildcats. What the Bruins and the Wildcats saw was a group of men in brightly colored sports coats.
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