Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSuits Los Angeles County
IN THE NEWS

Suits Los Angeles County

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During Los Angeles County's historic voting rights trial, an attorney argued before U.S. District Judge David V. Kenyon that the 1990s will produce a "different kind of Hispanic candidate . . . maybe even Republican, like Sarah Flores and Gaddi Vasquez." "Or . . . I just can't resist it," Kenyon interrupted, "(like) Supervisor Schabarum."
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2012 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
A coalition of environmental groups has filed suit against Los Angeles County, claiming the county's decision to allow the development of a massive residential project along the Santa Clara River would harm the waterway, destroy wildlife habitat and despoil cultural sites. According to the suit, filed Thursday in Los Angeles County Superior Court, the county would allow irreversible damage by approving the first phase of the Newhall Ranch development. Construction would also involve unearthing and desecrating American Indian burial sites and would threaten the California condor and the rare San Fernando Valley spineflower, the suit alleges.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1998
Compton officials filed a federal lawsuit against the California Department of Education on Wednesday, charging that it has violated students' constitutional rights by failing to provide them with an adequate education. The suit--filed less than a month after news broke that city and state negotiators had been trying to end years of bitter fighting--asks a judge to place the district under supervision of the city and to force the state to begin returning the district to local control.
NEWS
June 7, 2001 | Davan Maharaj
Wednesday's $3-billion verdict against Philip Morris is just one of many giant jury awards to come out of the Los Angeles County Superior Court's Central Civil West Courthouse. In 1999, a record $4.9-billion verdict against General Motors in a vehicle-fire case was issued by a jury at Central Civil West. (The trial judge later reduced the award, and the case is on appeal.
NEWS
June 7, 2001 | Davan Maharaj
Wednesday's $3-billion verdict against Philip Morris is just one of many giant jury awards to come out of the Los Angeles County Superior Court's Central Civil West Courthouse. In 1999, a record $4.9-billion verdict against General Motors in a vehicle-fire case was issued by a jury at Central Civil West. (The trial judge later reduced the award, and the case is on appeal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1993 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A precedent-setting lawsuit aimed at blocking construction in a environmentally sensitive oak savanna has successfully halted development of 1,880 homes planned for the land. But Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Robert H. O'Brien declined to rule that development should be completely barred in such areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1993 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an all-or-nothing gamble, environmentalists who two months ago won a half-victory in a lawsuit halting the 1,880-home Westridge development on Wednesday appealed the ruling in an attempt to win the other half. The appeal goes to the heart of Los Angeles County's administration of its network of 61 Significant Ecological Areas, a system that environmentalists feel the county has allowed to be plundered by developers.
NEWS
June 7, 2001 | MYRON LEVIN and DALONDO MOULTRIE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Los Angeles jury Wednesday ordered cigarette maker Philip Morris Inc. to pay more than $3 billion in damages to a cancer-stricken Marlboro smoker in one of the largest jury awards in history and the tobacco industry's worst defeat at the hands of an individual plaintiff. The award to Richard Boeken, 56, who suffers from lung cancer that has spread to his brain, came in the first smoking-and-health case ever tried in Los Angeles County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1998 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calvin Cooksey showed police the note he said he found outside his girlfriend's apartment, the one that made him think twice about taking the witness stand against the accused killer of two police officers. "Homeboy, if you testify," the note said, according to Cooksey's lawyer, "you, your sisters and your mother will be killed." In a lawsuit against Los Angeles County, Cooksey contends investigators pledged to protect his family, then failed to take any action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1998
Leaders of a local taxpayer group have sued the city for failing to produce complete copies of the city's legal bills. Thomas Biesek and Robert Cook of South Pasadena Taxpayers Assn. had requested legal bills in June from the law firm of Beltran, Leal & Medina, citing the state's open records law. The city, according to the lawsuit, refused to produce all of the legal bills for the firm, which had been employed as the municipality's city attorney.
NEWS
June 7, 2001 | MYRON LEVIN and DALONDO MOULTRIE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Los Angeles jury Wednesday ordered cigarette maker Philip Morris Inc. to pay more than $3 billion in damages to a cancer-stricken Marlboro smoker in one of the largest jury awards in history and the tobacco industry's worst defeat at the hands of an individual plaintiff. The award to Richard Boeken, 56, who suffers from lung cancer that has spread to his brain, came in the first smoking-and-health case ever tried in Los Angeles County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1998 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calvin Cooksey showed police the note he said he found outside his girlfriend's apartment, the one that made him think twice about taking the witness stand against the accused killer of two police officers. "Homeboy, if you testify," the note said, according to Cooksey's lawyer, "you, your sisters and your mother will be killed." In a lawsuit against Los Angeles County, Cooksey contends investigators pledged to protect his family, then failed to take any action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1998
Compton officials filed a federal lawsuit against the California Department of Education on Wednesday, charging that it has violated students' constitutional rights by failing to provide them with an adequate education. The suit--filed less than a month after news broke that city and state negotiators had been trying to end years of bitter fighting--asks a judge to place the district under supervision of the city and to force the state to begin returning the district to local control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1998
Leaders of a local taxpayer group have sued the city for failing to produce complete copies of the city's legal bills. Thomas Biesek and Robert Cook of South Pasadena Taxpayers Assn. had requested legal bills in June from the law firm of Beltran, Leal & Medina, citing the state's open records law. The city, according to the lawsuit, refused to produce all of the legal bills for the firm, which had been employed as the municipality's city attorney.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1993 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an all-or-nothing gamble, environmentalists who two months ago won a half-victory in a lawsuit halting the 1,880-home Westridge development on Wednesday appealed the ruling in an attempt to win the other half. The appeal goes to the heart of Los Angeles County's administration of its network of 61 Significant Ecological Areas, a system that environmentalists feel the county has allowed to be plundered by developers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1993 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A precedent-setting lawsuit aimed at blocking construction in a environmentally sensitive oak savanna has successfully halted development of 1,880 homes planned for the land. But Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Robert H. O'Brien declined to rule that development should be completely barred in such areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2012 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
A coalition of environmental groups has filed suit against Los Angeles County, claiming the county's decision to allow the development of a massive residential project along the Santa Clara River would harm the waterway, destroy wildlife habitat and despoil cultural sites. According to the suit, filed Thursday in Los Angeles County Superior Court, the county would allow irreversible damage by approving the first phase of the Newhall Ranch development. Construction would also involve unearthing and desecrating American Indian burial sites and would threaten the California condor and the rare San Fernando Valley spineflower, the suit alleges.
NEWS
October 3, 1986
Former McMartin Pre-School teacher Mary Ann Jackson filed the latest in a series of civil suits against Los Angeles County, the City of Manhattan Beach and a child-abuse diagnostic center, among others, claiming that her life was ruined by charges that she molested students at the preschool. Jackson is one of five defendants against whom charges were later dropped for lack of evidence.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During Los Angeles County's historic voting rights trial, an attorney argued before U.S. District Judge David V. Kenyon that the 1990s will produce a "different kind of Hispanic candidate . . . maybe even Republican, like Sarah Flores and Gaddi Vasquez." "Or . . . I just can't resist it," Kenyon interrupted, "(like) Supervisor Schabarum."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|