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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
The Bristol Old Vic production of "A Midsummer Night's Dream" currently at the Broad Stage and the Théâtre de Bouffes du Nord production of "The Suit," which opens Wednesday at UCLA's Freud Playhouse, both are connected to South Africa. Shakespeare's play involves Cape Town's Handspring Puppet Company. "The Suit" is an adaptation of a short story by South African writer Can Themba.  Furthermore, both productions are projects of British directors. But while Tom Morris and Peter Brook are generations apart and Morris' "Dream" and Brooks' "Suit" represent quite different sensibilities, what the directors mainly have in common is that each, in his own way, has worked now and then in opera and made a considerable impact doing so.  Morris' primary claim to fame may be his collaboration with Handspring on "War Horse.
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NATIONAL
April 3, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
On picturesque winter slopes, the youngsters racing snowboards downhill and the mature skiers calmly gliding down have routinely been cast as warring snow-lovers. A Utah ski resort has tried to keep feuding off its slopes by banning snowboards altogether since the 1980s. Four middle-aged snowboarders are protesting that policy, filing a lawsuit  in January. The snowboarders sued Alta Ski Area and the U.S. Forest Service in U.S. District Court in Utah. They argue that their constitutional right to equal use of federal land had been irrationally denied and that the Forest Service, working in concert with Alta, allowed discrimination in violation of the snowboarders' due process rights.
SPORTS
April 2, 2014 | By Mike Bresnahan
SACRAMENTO - Pau Gasol's vertigo came back with a vengeance and Chris Kaman's right calf wouldn't cooperate. It was almost time for assistant coaches Kurt Rambis and Mark Madsen to suit up for the Lakers. "Only if they let me wear the short shorts," Rambis said beforehand and, yeah, that wasn't really possible. So the Lakers plowed ahead with nine players and lost to the equally awful Sacramento Kings, 107-102, on Wednesday at Sleep Train Arena. The Lakers (25-50)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Victoria Kim
After Maria de Jesus Arroyo was pronounced dead of cardiac arrest in the summer of 2010, her husband and children said their goodbyes and left her in the hands of hospital staff. When they saw her next at the funeral, her nose was broken and she had gashes and bruises on her face - injuries too severe to be covered up, despite the morticians' best efforts. The outraged family sued the hospital, White Memorial Medical Center in Boyle Heights, believing the hospital had mishandled the 80-year-old woman's body.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Michael Robertson put the bag of chemicals in an inside pocket of his sport coat, the pump in the other. He snaked the tubes between the buttons of his shirt to the port in his chest. He adjusted his tie to cover them. Then he sat down in a cavernous room in the White House complex and pulled his chair close to the table, hiding the bulges. Robertson, an aide to President Obama, was meeting with top officials from federal agencies working to implement the Affordable Care Act. He was also in treatment for stage IV colorectal cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- Oakland has reached a $4.5-million settlement with a Marine veteran who suffered brain damage when a police officer shot him with a beanbag projectile during an Occupy Oakland protest, the city announced Friday. Scott Olsen, 26, who served two tours in Iraq,  suffered a fractured skull and traumatic brain injury on Oct. 25, 2011, when Oakland police tried to disperse a crowd near City Hall. Olsen said he was standing still and behaving peacefully when he was struck.
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | By Susan Denley
If you think Kermit the Frog and his nemesis Constantine look pretty dapper in Disney's  "Muppets Most Wanted," you're right. The Muppets were dressed in part by Brooks Brothers -- right along with human costars Ricky Gervais, Ty Burrell and Stanley Tucci, among others. Brooks, whose name is synonymous with classic men's clothing, collaborated with costume designer Rahel Afiley to provide more than 200 items for male cast members including the two green ones. Among other things, the frogs were outfitted with bespoke morning suits for one pivotal scene.
HEALTH
March 21, 2014 | By Jessica Ogilvie
Onstage at the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall in Costa Mesa, an older couple assumes a ballroom dance position. A tango begins, and the man, wearing a porkpie hat and suit, leads. The woman, wearing a floral dress, follows gracefully. Judging by the ease and fluidity of their movements, one would never know that Nancy Dufault, 72, has Parkinson's disease. When she is dancing, moving in time with her husband, Bob, she experiences a brief respite from symptoms. "She asked me to write a tango," says Mike Garson, a classically trained pianist who played with David Bowie for nearly 40 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Meg James
A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge has dismissed an extortion lawsuit brought by popular Spanish-language radio personality Eddie “Piolin” Sotelo against six former staff members of his canceled Univision Radio show - and ruled that Sotelo may be liable for his adversaries' legal fees. In a civil lawsuit filed in August, Sotelo claimed that he was the victim of a shakedown by the former workers and their attorneys. Sotelo maintained that the group banded together to demand $4.9 million from him in exchange for their silence - or else they would go public with additional allegations about boorish behavior on his Univision Radio show, which had been canceled a month earlier.  PHOTOS: Biggest box office flops of 2013 Judge Richard A. Stone dismissed Sotelo's lawsuit late last week, finding that Sotelo had failed to prove that he would prevail with his extortion claims during a trial.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
A federal judge has ruled that Kansas and Arizona should be allowed to require voters to provide evidence of U.S. citizenship, in a case closely watched by both sides dealing with the question of voter eligibility. U.S. District Judge Eric Melgren in Wichita, Kan., ruled that the U.S. Election Assistance Commission had no legal authority to deny requests from the two states to add the citizenship requirement. In the ruling, released Wednesday, he ordered the commission to revise the national form immediately.
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