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Sukkot

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2010 | Sandy Banks
When I moved here from Ohio 30 years ago, the first friend I made was Yael, the daughter of a rabbi from Israel. She had grown up immersed in Judaism's rituals, but left orthodoxy behind when she came to Los Angeles, married a businessman and settled in suburbia. Still, every fall, she would erect a sukkah — a makeshift shelter with wooden posts, canvas walls and leafy roof — next to the swimming pool in her backyard. For seven days, her family would eat every meal inside that shelter, in observance of the holiday Sukkot, considered in the Jewish faith "the season of our rejoicing.
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OPINION
October 11, 2011 | By Yitzchok Adlerstein
As trade embargoes go, this one probably won't make it into the history books. It won't have much impact on the economy or create shortages of critical goods. But a decision by the Egyptian Ministry of Agriculture to ban all sales of palm fronds to Israel this year was, at the least, not very neighborly. Wednesday at sundown marks the beginning of the Jewish holiday of Sukkot, an autumn celebration of God's providence and bounty. Part of the celebration involves gathering four plants, including a date palm branch or lulav, which is used during a prayer and other parts of a religious service.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1999 | DIANE WEDNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
And ye shall take you on the first day the fruit of goodly trees, branches of palm trees, and boughs of thick trees, and willows of the brook, and ye shall rejoice before the Lord your God seven days. --Leviticus * Autumn blew into town this week and landed at Adat Ari El Temple and Day School, where a dozen or so eager children ushered in the season by decorating a large, three-sided structure of wooden trellises in preparation for the Jewish harvest festival of Sukkot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2010 | Sandy Banks
When I moved here from Ohio 30 years ago, the first friend I made was Yael, the daughter of a rabbi from Israel. She had grown up immersed in Judaism's rituals, but left orthodoxy behind when she came to Los Angeles, married a businessman and settled in suburbia. Still, every fall, she would erect a sukkah — a makeshift shelter with wooden posts, canvas walls and leafy roof — next to the swimming pool in her backyard. For seven days, her family would eat every meal inside that shelter, in observance of the holiday Sukkot, considered in the Jewish faith "the season of our rejoicing.
FOOD
September 22, 1994 | JUDY ZEIDLER
As a child, I loved the grapes that had been attached to the palm leaves atop the succahs . Succahs are the outdoor huts built to celebrate Sukkot, the Jewish holiday being celebrated this week that reminds of the exodus from Egypt and gives thanks for a fruitful harvest. Succahs symbolize the huts used by harvest workers during biblical times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1998
* Congregation Am HaYam in Oxnard will hold Sukkot will be held in members' homes today through Monday. Shemini Atzeret will be held in members' homes at 8 p.m. Sunday and at 10 a.m. Monday. Simchat Torah services will be held at the Oxnard Monday Club at 6:30 p.m. Monday and 10 a.m. Tuesday. The Monday service is especially for families, and costumes are welcome. A new Talmud Torah Family School meets every Thursday at 3 p.m. at the Oxnard Monday Club.
FOOD
October 3, 2001 | PHYLLIS GLAZER and MIRIYAM GLAZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The religious calendar waits for no one; despite the political turmoil, violence and ever-present threat of more terrorist attacks and suicide bombers, Jews here and throughout the world are in the midst of celebrating Sukkot, an eight-day harvest festival (seven in Israel) known alternately as the "The Season of Our Joy," and the "Festival of the Ingathering."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1998 | ELAINE GALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the High Holidays barely over, many Jewish families already are busy hammering away in their backyards for the next celebration--Sukkot, or the Feast of Tabernacles. Sukkot is a harvest celebration that also honors the temporary dwellings that the Jews lived in during their biblical wanderings across the desert for 40 years to the land of Israel. It also is a time for families to build a similar three-sided booth--called a sukkah--in their own yards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1998 | GENA PASILLAS
Temple Beth Shalom will host its annual "Discover Modern Israel" Sukkot Country Fair from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. Booths will display contemporary Israeli technology, foods, transportation, occupations and activities. Proceeds will benefit community service projects, temple youth scholarships and educational programs. The temple is at 2625 N. Tustin Ave., Santa Ana. (714) 544-7889. A Lutheran College Fair will take place from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday at Embassy Suites in Anaheim.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2008 | Duke Helfand, Times Staff Writer
Sukkot is one of the most joyous holidays on the Jewish calendar, a seven-day period known as the "season of our rejoicing" that follows shortly after the solemnity of Yom Kippur. Sukkot commemorates the 40-year period during which the Jewish people wandered in the desert wilderness on their way from Egypt to Israel. The word sukkah means booth, and refers to the temporary shelters Jews lived in during their wanderings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2008 | Duke Helfand, Times Staff Writer
Sukkot is one of the most joyous holidays on the Jewish calendar, a seven-day period known as the "season of our rejoicing" that follows shortly after the solemnity of Yom Kippur. Sukkot commemorates the 40-year period during which the Jewish people wandered in the desert wilderness on their way from Egypt to Israel. The word sukkah means booth, and refers to the temporary shelters Jews lived in during their wanderings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2007 | Deborah Schoch, Times Staff Writer
A palm frond famine is upon us. The city of Los Angeles has decided to stop its practice of supplying Jewish families with palm fronds for the annual harvest holiday of Sukkot. In upstate New York, some families place dried cornstalks on the roofs of the backyard huts where they eat and sleep to celebrate the holiday. In New England, some prefer sweet-smelling evergreen boughs atop the simple hut or booth, known as a sukkah. But this is Los Angeles, where the palm tree reigns.
WORLD
October 14, 2005 | Ken Ellingwood, Times Staff Writer
In devout Jewish neighborhoods here, the annual Sukkot holiday comes wrapped in a drama over palm fronds this year. Israel has been struck by a shortage of imported date palm fronds, which for the religiously observant are essential for prayer during the Sukkot celebration that will begin Monday night. News that there may not be enough fronds, or lulavim, has prompted religious leaders to mull backup plans and led to nearly doubled prices, to $25 each or more for the most common variety.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2004 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
Rafael Barragan was raised in Mexico as a Catholic. But as a gardener in Los Angeles' Mid-Wilshire area, most of his customers are Jewish. So the 46-year-old gardener cuts lawns by day and reads Maimonides' code of Jewish law at night. And for 27 years, he has helped Jewish families in Los Angeles celebrate the annual festival of Sukkot.
FOOD
October 3, 2001 | PHYLLIS GLAZER and MIRIYAM GLAZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The religious calendar waits for no one; despite the political turmoil, violence and ever-present threat of more terrorist attacks and suicide bombers, Jews here and throughout the world are in the midst of celebrating Sukkot, an eight-day harvest festival (seven in Israel) known alternately as the "The Season of Our Joy," and the "Festival of the Ingathering."
FOOD
October 11, 2000 | JUDY ZEIDLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sukkot is a Jewish holiday that offers thanks for the fall harvest of fruits, vegetables and grains. It is the custom to build an outdoor sukkah, which resembles the small huts that farmers lived in during the harvest season in biblical times. To strengthen the harvest image, apples, grapes and other fresh and dried fruits are hung overhead.
NEWS
October 12, 1989 | MICHAEL ARKUSH, Times Staff Writer
Worshipers build a small shack in their back yards. They eat, sleep and pray there. They gaze at the stars, not the television. They call it Sukkot, the feast of Tabernacles, and Jews have been celebrating it for thousands of years. Sukkot isn't as widely observed as Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashanah and is generally unrecognized by non-Jews.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1995 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hundreds of visitors to one of Orange County's largest and oldest synagogues were in a festive mood Sunday, and why not? The holiday calling on Jews to atone for their sins, Yom Kippur, had just passed. And members of Temple Beth Sholom in Santa Ana were celebrating a more lighthearted holiday, Sukkot, which marks the harvest and means "festival of the huts" in Hebrew.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1999 | DIANE WEDNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
And ye shall take you on the first day the fruit of goodly trees, branches of palm trees, and boughs of thick trees, and willows of the brook, and ye shall rejoice before the Lord your God seven days. --Leviticus * Autumn blew into town this week and landed at Adat Ari El Temple and Day School, where a dozen or so eager children ushered in the season by decorating a large, three-sided structure of wooden trellises in preparation for the Jewish harvest festival of Sukkot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1998 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To an outsider, the collection of makeshift shelters of metal poles, wood trellises and palm fronds might not seem like the ideal measuring stick for gauging the strength of a community. But this celebration of the Jewish holiday of Sukkot, a harvest festival characterized by the construction of a sukkah, or booth, in homes or at synagogues, drew 200 people to Encino on a warm October Sunday.
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