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Sulaymaniyah Iraq

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July 22, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kurdish peshmerga guerrillas held this large city Sunday night, three days after intense fighting ended with up to 200 dead and 2,500 Iraqi soldiers prisoners of the peshmerga. But a brigade force of 2,500 Iraqi soldiers patrolled the outskirts and surrounding area of Sulaymaniyah, a city of more than 900,000 in northeastern Iraq known as the birthplace of Kurdish nationalism. Sulaymaniyah was peaceful Sunday night.
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NEWS
July 22, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kurdish peshmerga guerrillas held this large city Sunday night, three days after intense fighting ended with up to 200 dead and 2,500 Iraqi soldiers prisoners of the peshmerga. But a brigade force of 2,500 Iraqi soldiers patrolled the outskirts and surrounding area of Sulaymaniyah, a city of more than 900,000 in northeastern Iraq known as the birthplace of Kurdish nationalism. Sulaymaniyah was peaceful Sunday night.
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NEWS
March 13, 1986
Amnesty International accused Iraq of gross human rights violations including arbitrary arrests of scores of children, three of whom were said to have died from torture, and summary executions. A representative of the London-based human rights group told the U.N. Human Rights Commission that about 300 children were arrested last autumn in the town of Sulaymaniyah, in Iraq's Kurdish region.
NEWS
October 22, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Iranian-sponsored Kurdish guerrillas continued fighting to keep control of a hydroelectric dam in northern Iraq as thousands of civilians fled into Iran to escape the warfare between Kurdish rivals. A U.S. envoy, meanwhile, met with the leader of the Iraqi-backed faction in an effort to reach a cease-fire. The Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK), which is supported by Iran, held Dukan Dam.
NEWS
April 4, 2003 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
U.S. soldiers joined their Kurdish allies in close combat against Iraqi forces during a daylong battle Thursday on the edge of this northern town. Until this battle, front-line U.S. troops in this region for the most part had served as forward air controllers for the Kurdish fighters, selecting targets and calling in airstrikes. But the Americans were drawn into the fight Thursday morning after coming under attack.
NEWS
September 5, 1996 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A big loser in new regional tumult, Turkey on Wednesday threatened new armed intervention of its own against separatist guerrillas in northern Iraq and demanded compensation for American derailing of an Iraqi oil-for-food plan. A key pillar in the U.S.-led coalition against Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein during the 1991 Persian Gulf War, the Turks have long complained about the bitter aftermath for them.
NEWS
March 27, 2003 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
Kurds call it the rashaba, the black storm whose howling wind and driving rain tear at the flimsy plastic walls of refugees' tents on this muddy hillside. For two days and nights, a torrent of rain and sleet that pricks like millions of tiny needles has made life even more miserable for more than 150 refugees living in seven trucks and 10 makeshift tents. After sunset, the temperature dips to near-freezing.
WORLD
October 9, 2002 | MICHAEL SLACKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 12 years of trade sanctions and of Western fighter jets patrolling and bombing northern and southern Iraq, Saddam Hussein still has an integrated air defense system with radar, missiles and artillery that poses a daily threat to American pilots, U.S. military officials here say. Although no one is claiming that those air defenses are especially sophisticated, or that the U.S.
NEWS
September 10, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT and HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Kurdish forces backed by Iraqi President Saddam Hussein on Monday swept into Sulaymaniyah, effectively extending Baghdad's control over all of northern Iraq for the first time since the United States created a Kurdish haven after the 1991 Persian Gulf War. Sulaymaniyah--with a population of about 750,000--had been the headquarters of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK), which has waged serious battle with the Hussein-backed Democratic Party of Kurdistan (KDP) since last month.
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