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Suleiman Franjieh

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NEWS
July 24, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Suleiman Franjieh, the last of a generation of Christian warlords and the president of Lebanon when it disintegrated into civil war, died Thursday at the age of 82. A spokesman for American University Hospital, where Franjieh died, said he had been admitted July 2 and had been in fragile health for several years. Franjieh was among the zaims , or feudal lords, who largely controlled Lebanon after independence from France in 1943.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Amin al-Hafez, 83, former Lebanese prime minister who served a turbulent two-month term in 1973 before being forced to resign, died Monday in a Beirut hospital after a long-running battle with an undisclosed chronic illness, medical officials said. A Sunni Muslim, he was picked by then-President Suleiman Franjieh to form a government in 1973. Although the prime minister's job is reserved for a Sunni under Lebanon's sectarian power-sharing system, Sunni religious leaders who opposed Franjieh refused to recognize the appointment.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Amin al-Hafez, 83, former Lebanese prime minister who served a turbulent two-month term in 1973 before being forced to resign, died Monday in a Beirut hospital after a long-running battle with an undisclosed chronic illness, medical officials said. A Sunni Muslim, he was picked by then-President Suleiman Franjieh to form a government in 1973. Although the prime minister's job is reserved for a Sunni under Lebanon's sectarian power-sharing system, Sunni religious leaders who opposed Franjieh refused to recognize the appointment.
WORLD
April 19, 2005 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
They catch sight of each other sometimes, at funerals or weddings back in the village, but they haven't had a conversation in years. The two men share the same blood and the same last name, but in today's Lebanon they belong to enemy camps, squaring off against each other as a political crisis shudders through the nation. Suleiman Franjieh is Lebanon's outgoing interior minister, a dapper 40-year-old who dreamed, they say, of becoming president.
NEWS
August 19, 1988 | Times Wire Services
Lebanon's presidential election was postponed Thursday after Parliament failed to reach a quorum as a result of a boycott by hard-line Christians opposed to a Syrian-backed candidate who was favored to win. Interior Minister Abdullah Rassi accused Christian militiamen of "forcefully preventing" 17 members of Parliament from attending the meeting to vote for former President Suleiman Franjieh, who has close ties to Syria.
WORLD
April 19, 2005 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
They catch sight of each other sometimes, at funerals or weddings back in the village, but they haven't had a conversation in years. The two men share the same blood and the same last name, but in today's Lebanon they belong to enemy camps, squaring off against each other as a political crisis shudders through the nation. Suleiman Franjieh is Lebanon's outgoing interior minister, a dapper 40-year-old who dreamed, they say, of becoming president.
NEWS
August 16, 1988 | Associated Press
Suleiman Franjieh, Lebanon's president when civil war broke out 13 years ago, announced today that he will seek a new term, triggering a political crisis that could delay elections set for this week. The news that Franjieh, 78, will run was announced on the Voice of Unified Free Lebanon radio station, which he controls. The radio said Franjieh plans to travel from his summer home in Ehden, northern Lebanon, to Muslim West Beirut today to set up campaign headquarters.
NEWS
August 17, 1988 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
After 13 years of intermittent civil war, Lebanon was thrown into a new uproar Tuesday when Suleiman Franjieh, a former president with close ties to Syria, announced that he will be a candidate in the country's presidential elections, scheduled for this week. Conservative Christian leaders announced that they would take political and military steps, if necessary, to block Franjieh's selection as the next president.
NEWS
January 29, 1986
A senior Lebanese Christian leader, former President Suleiman Franjieh, 85, added his voice to the chorus demanding the resignation of President Amin Gemayel. Franjieh, who has close ties to Syria, called Gemayel's ouster the "only way out" of the crisis created when Christian militia leader Elie Hobeika was overthrown for joining Muslim militias in signing a Syrian-brokered peace agreement.
NEWS
October 13, 1989
A Swiss airline stewardess abducted in northern Lebanon has been released into the custody of a senior Lebanese politician, a diplomatic source said today. The source said Syrian troops passed the unnamed woman into the custody of former President Suleiman Franjieh on Thursday after she was seized by unidentified gunmen Sunday. The source said her kidnaping had been a personal matter.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Suleiman Franjieh, the last of a generation of Christian warlords and the president of Lebanon when it disintegrated into civil war, died Thursday at the age of 82. A spokesman for American University Hospital, where Franjieh died, said he had been admitted July 2 and had been in fragile health for several years. Franjieh was among the zaims , or feudal lords, who largely controlled Lebanon after independence from France in 1943.
NEWS
August 19, 1988 | Times Wire Services
Lebanon's presidential election was postponed Thursday after Parliament failed to reach a quorum as a result of a boycott by hard-line Christians opposed to a Syrian-backed candidate who was favored to win. Interior Minister Abdullah Rassi accused Christian militiamen of "forcefully preventing" 17 members of Parliament from attending the meeting to vote for former President Suleiman Franjieh, who has close ties to Syria.
NEWS
August 17, 1988 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
After 13 years of intermittent civil war, Lebanon was thrown into a new uproar Tuesday when Suleiman Franjieh, a former president with close ties to Syria, announced that he will be a candidate in the country's presidential elections, scheduled for this week. Conservative Christian leaders announced that they would take political and military steps, if necessary, to block Franjieh's selection as the next president.
NEWS
August 16, 1988 | Associated Press
Suleiman Franjieh, Lebanon's president when civil war broke out 13 years ago, announced today that he will seek a new term, triggering a political crisis that could delay elections set for this week. The news that Franjieh, 78, will run was announced on the Voice of Unified Free Lebanon radio station, which he controls. The radio said Franjieh plans to travel from his summer home in Ehden, northern Lebanon, to Muslim West Beirut today to set up campaign headquarters.
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