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Suleiman Layeq

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NEWS
October 8, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Throughout a decade of war, Suleiman Layeq has been haunted by his "man from the mountains." Layeq, a key Cabinet minister in the beleaguered government of Afghan President Najibullah, doesn't even remember the man's name. But for Layeq, a celebrated Pushtun poet and author, the man from the mountains has come to symbolize the brutality, tragedy and increasing ambiguity of a war that continues to tear his nation apart.
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NEWS
October 8, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Throughout a decade of war, Suleiman Layeq has been haunted by his "man from the mountains." Layeq, a key Cabinet minister in the beleaguered government of Afghan President Najibullah, doesn't even remember the man's name. But for Layeq, a celebrated Pushtun poet and author, the man from the mountains has come to symbolize the brutality, tragedy and increasing ambiguity of a war that continues to tear his nation apart.
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NEWS
April 19, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ousted President Najibullah spends what may well be the last days of his life in a small room with a television and a radio. There are only a few chairs, enough for his trusted brother and the two generals who remain by his side. Every hour he sits, he waits to learn whether he will live or die. Holed up in a loosely guarded U.N.
NEWS
April 26, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebel commander Mohammed Tahir didn't have much of a strategy to fend off rival moujahedeen factions after he took the Afghan regime's main armory of weapons and ammunition Saturday morning without firing a shot. But somehow, it worked. "We were here first," Tahir said, explaining how he fended off the challenge of another guerrilla force loyal to fundamentalist leader Gulbuddin Hekmatyar and held the strategic facility for his own rebel leader, Commander Ahmed Shah Masoud, a moderate.
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old former Communist clicked his plastic worry beads and scowled. It was the precise moment, as it turned out, that Afghanistan's fierce Islamic rebels, who had battled the Soviet-style regime for the past 13 years, won their holy war--swarming the strategic capital with thousands of battle-scarred moujahedeen warriors.
NEWS
April 17, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man so big in stature and so brutal in technique that he was nicknamed "The Ox" was clearly in a good mood that day, beaming broadly as he predicted confidently that history would remember him as the savior of his nation. Seated at the big wooden conference table in an office ringed by security men, President Najibullah banged the table time and again to make his point.
NEWS
March 15, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through a decade of war, Gen. Abdul Rashid Dostam commanded the fiercest Afghan militia division, up to 40,000 heavily armed mercenaries known as the Jauzjan, who were used as storm troopers by the Soviet Red Army and Kabul's authoritarian regimes against a nationwide, U.S.-backed Islamic rebellion. Now, with peace at hand, Gen. Dostam is in open revolt against Afghanistan's strongman President Najibullah and the army commanders he once loyally served.
NEWS
March 28, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a typically icy February morning here in the Afghan capital that day, when what appeared to be a routine traffic stop suddenly became a kidnap-murder that sent shock waves around the world. The snow was packed deep on the peaks of the Hindu Kush all around, and the morning traffic, as always, was snarled around the downtown intersection between the U.S. Cultural Center and the headquarters of the Soviet-style Afghan secret police.
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