Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSuleyman Demirel
IN THE NEWS

Suleyman Demirel

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Veteran Turkish conservative Suleyman Demirel took power again Wednesday in a new coalition government that diplomats say has a tough balancing act to perform if it is to survive more than six months. Challenges facing the new government include annual inflation of almost 70%, an increasingly dangerous Kurdish insurgency and unrest on its borders with the Balkans and the Soviet Union.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
September 17, 2010 | By Reza Aslan
A political party espousing a commitment to what it calls "Islamic moral values" has brought Turkey closer to a full-fledged democracy than it has ever been. On Sunday, 30 years after a military coup overturned the democratically elected government of Suleyman Demirel, Turks voted overwhelmingly for constitutional changes pushed through by the moderate Islamists of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan's Justice and Development Party (known by its Turkish initials AKP). The reforms strengthen the rights of women, children and the handicapped, provide greater freedoms for Turkey's Christian and Kurdish minorities (both of whom have been repeatedly persecuted and marginalized by previous governments)
Advertisement
NEWS
May 19, 1996 | From Associated Press
A man upset about Turkey's military cooperation with Israel pointed a gun at President Suleyman Demirel on Saturday, but bodyguards tackled him and Demirel escaped unharmed. A Turkish journalist and a policeman were slightly injured when the gun went off during the scuffle. The gunman said he was angry at the president over a treaty signed in February allowing Israeli jets to train in Turkish air space, Interior Minister Ulku Guney told a news conference in Ankara, the capital.
NEWS
May 19, 1996 | From Associated Press
A man upset about Turkey's military cooperation with Israel pointed a gun at President Suleyman Demirel on Saturday, but bodyguards tackled him and Demirel escaped unharmed. A Turkish journalist and a policeman were slightly injured when the gun went off during the scuffle. The gunman said he was angry at the president over a treaty signed in February allowing Israeli jets to train in Turkish air space, Interior Minister Ulku Guney told a news conference in Ankara, the capital.
NEWS
November 30, 1987 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Incumbent Prime Minister Turgut Ozal, a chicken-in-every-pot conservative who pledges rapid modernization as a major American ally, appeared to gain a powerful new mandate here Sunday in Turkey's freest elections in a decade. Ozal's center-right Motherland Party easily outdistanced six opponents on both the left and the right to win control of an expanded 450-seat Parliament for a five-year term. The voting was conspicuous for its orderliness.
NEWS
December 14, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Setting Turkey firmly on a new course in its Middle East policy, new Prime Minister Suleyman Demirel has launched a two-pronged initiative in an attempt to resolve one of his most important problems, the region's 20 million Kurds. In Turkey's Kurdish southeast, Demirel has promised a new era of respect for human rights and cultural freedoms for a 12-million-strong minority whose existence the Turkish republic refused to acknowledge for more than 65 years.
NEWS
October 22, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For this nation, it was the day of the white horse. It pranced larger than life above the headquarters of a jubilant political party here Monday and shimmered in rampant triumph from a hundred thousand lampposts across the country. For the Turks who shelter in its image, the white horse has a simple message: "The Future Belongs to Daddy," read one affirmation of hope and self-congratulation daubed on a whitewashed wall.
OPINION
September 17, 2010 | By Reza Aslan
A political party espousing a commitment to what it calls "Islamic moral values" has brought Turkey closer to a full-fledged democracy than it has ever been. On Sunday, 30 years after a military coup overturned the democratically elected government of Suleyman Demirel, Turks voted overwhelmingly for constitutional changes pushed through by the moderate Islamists of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan's Justice and Development Party (known by its Turkish initials AKP). The reforms strengthen the rights of women, children and the handicapped, provide greater freedoms for Turkey's Christian and Kurdish minorities (both of whom have been repeatedly persecuted and marginalized by previous governments)
NEWS
January 16, 1993 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just as this week's two apparently harmless fires at the Chernobyl nuclear plant rekindled popular fears in Ukraine, Turkey has been reliving its own nightmare of those fearful days of radioactive clouds and rain. But whereas Ukrainians have lived for years with the impact of the April, 1986, disaster--8,000 people are thought to have died as a result--the Turks 700 miles to the south had always been told that they had little to worry about.
NEWS
October 24, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Thousands of Turkish troops have crossed into northern Iraq to flush an estimated 8,000 Turkish Kurdish guerrillas from their mountain strongholds, Prime Minister Suleyman Demirel said in Ankara. Demirel, referring to the guerrillas as "mosquitoes," told a news conference that Ankara wants to deny them sanctuary in northern Iraq, where the Baghdad government has no authority.
NEWS
December 14, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Setting Turkey firmly on a new course in its Middle East policy, new Prime Minister Suleyman Demirel has launched a two-pronged initiative in an attempt to resolve one of his most important problems, the region's 20 million Kurds. In Turkey's Kurdish southeast, Demirel has promised a new era of respect for human rights and cultural freedoms for a 12-million-strong minority whose existence the Turkish republic refused to acknowledge for more than 65 years.
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Veteran Turkish conservative Suleyman Demirel took power again Wednesday in a new coalition government that diplomats say has a tough balancing act to perform if it is to survive more than six months. Challenges facing the new government include annual inflation of almost 70%, an increasingly dangerous Kurdish insurgency and unrest on its borders with the Balkans and the Soviet Union.
NEWS
October 22, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For this nation, it was the day of the white horse. It pranced larger than life above the headquarters of a jubilant political party here Monday and shimmered in rampant triumph from a hundred thousand lampposts across the country. For the Turks who shelter in its image, the white horse has a simple message: "The Future Belongs to Daddy," read one affirmation of hope and self-congratulation daubed on a whitewashed wall.
NEWS
November 30, 1987 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Incumbent Prime Minister Turgut Ozal, a chicken-in-every-pot conservative who pledges rapid modernization as a major American ally, appeared to gain a powerful new mandate here Sunday in Turkey's freest elections in a decade. Ozal's center-right Motherland Party easily outdistanced six opponents on both the left and the right to win control of an expanded 450-seat Parliament for a five-year term. The voting was conspicuous for its orderliness.
NEWS
April 7, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Turkish Prime Minister Bulent Ecevit said his three-way coalition was unshaken by a severe defeat in parliament and would continue working for economic reforms. The left-of-center premier had put his reputation on the line to secure a constitutional amendment that would have given President Suleyman Demirel a chance at a second term. "Despite the failure to realize changes to the constitution, we give great importance to economic and political stability," Ecevit said in a statement.
NEWS
September 7, 1987
Turkish Prime Minister Turgut Ozal called for an early general election as Turks finished voting in a referendum on whether to restore political freedom to former leaders. Nearly complete results showed voters almost evenly divided on lifting the restrictions imposed on politicians who include former Prime Ministers Suleyman Demirel and Bulent Ecevit.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|