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Sulfates

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1995 | From Times staff and wire reports
A new model of global warming that includes sulfates--byproducts of power plants that reflect sunlight and counteract warming--shows that the Earth's climate will continue to heat up until the entire world is warmer in 2050, British meteorologists report in the journal Nature. "We predict a future global mean warming of 0.54 degrees Fahrenheit per decade for greenhouse gases alone, or 0.36 degrees Fahrenheit per decade with sulfate aerosol forcing included," the report said. Critics of global warming theory have said current models do not successfully reflect what has happened in the past, and thus should not be used to predict weather patterns.
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NEWS
January 6, 2002 | TIMOTHY D. MAY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
They wade into cold streams with color-wheel gauges to test phosphate, nitrate and sulfate levels. They scoop sediment from stream beds, noting its color and smell. Citizen scientists, they call themselves, volunteers who keep watch over Pennsylvania's waterways. Men like Jim Haney, a 67-year-old retired environmental engineer from New Cumberland, and Bud Bankert, a 73-year-old retired biology teacher.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2000
Mysteriously high salt concentrations in the exposed soils of Antarctica's dry valleys--areas perennially devoid of snow and ice cover--are caused by sulfur-emitting marine algae, UC San Diego researchers report in today's Nature. In a discovery important for future Martian exploration, the scientists also found that digging more deeply into the soil of the dry valleys yielded higher concentrations of biologically produced sulfates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2000
Mysteriously high salt concentrations in the exposed soils of Antarctica's dry valleys--areas perennially devoid of snow and ice cover--are caused by sulfur-emitting marine algae, UC San Diego researchers report in today's Nature. In a discovery important for future Martian exploration, the scientists also found that digging more deeply into the soil of the dry valleys yielded higher concentrations of biologically produced sulfates.
SPORTS
April 21, 1993
Fishermen never know what will start the fish biting--warmer weather, dark of the moon--but Lake Perris marina manager Charlie Lamkin notes that a surge in largemouth bass catches coincided when the Riverside County reservoir received a dose of copper sulfate to reduce algae the past week. "Maybe it was just a coincidence," Lamkin said, "but the bass really turned on."
NEWS
January 6, 2002 | TIMOTHY D. MAY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
They wade into cold streams with color-wheel gauges to test phosphate, nitrate and sulfate levels. They scoop sediment from stream beds, noting its color and smell. Citizen scientists, they call themselves, volunteers who keep watch over Pennsylvania's waterways. Men like Jim Haney, a 67-year-old retired environmental engineer from New Cumberland, and Bud Bankert, a 73-year-old retired biology teacher.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1996 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thad and Sharon Brown and their children spend a lot of time upstairs in their $600,000 view home in the hills here. The view isn't necessarily any better, but downstairs, Brown says, is where a cancer is eating away at the very foundation of the house. Water seeping in through too-porous concrete has soaked the carpet in a guest room and the slab and foundation walls are chipping and flaking away.
NEWS
May 18, 1993 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S. pharmaceutical company has agreed to produce an important tuberculosis drug that has been in critically short supply in this country for the last two years, federal health officials announced Monday. The drug, streptomycin sulfate, which is given by injection, will be manufactured by Pfizer Inc., of New York, under a special application recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Production should end a shortage that began in mid-1991 after the last U.S.
HEALTH
July 20, 2009 | Jill U. Adams
That longtime staple of medicine cabinets, acetaminophen, appears to be under fire. Used to treat headaches, muscle aches and seemingly every other ache Americans have, the drug -- found most notably in the brand name pain reliever Tylenol -- has recently been called a potential danger to the millions of people who take it. But the drug itself hasn't changed. Nor have the number of problems associated with it. The only new element is public attention to its risks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1995 | From Times staff and wire reports
A new model of global warming that includes sulfates--byproducts of power plants that reflect sunlight and counteract warming--shows that the Earth's climate will continue to heat up until the entire world is warmer in 2050, British meteorologists report in the journal Nature. "We predict a future global mean warming of 0.54 degrees Fahrenheit per decade for greenhouse gases alone, or 0.36 degrees Fahrenheit per decade with sulfate aerosol forcing included," the report said.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1996 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thad and Sharon Brown and their children spend a lot of time upstairs in their $600,000 view home in the hills here. The view isn't necessarily any better, but downstairs, Brown says, is where a cancer is eating away at the very foundation of the house. Water seeping in through too-porous concrete has soaked the carpet in a guest room and the slab and foundation walls are chipping and flaking away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1995 | From Times staff and wire reports
A new model of global warming that includes sulfates--byproducts of power plants that reflect sunlight and counteract warming--shows that the Earth's climate will continue to heat up until the entire world is warmer in 2050, British meteorologists report in the journal Nature. "We predict a future global mean warming of 0.54 degrees Fahrenheit per decade for greenhouse gases alone, or 0.36 degrees Fahrenheit per decade with sulfate aerosol forcing included," the report said. Critics of global warming theory have said current models do not successfully reflect what has happened in the past, and thus should not be used to predict weather patterns.
NEWS
May 18, 1993 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S. pharmaceutical company has agreed to produce an important tuberculosis drug that has been in critically short supply in this country for the last two years, federal health officials announced Monday. The drug, streptomycin sulfate, which is given by injection, will be manufactured by Pfizer Inc., of New York, under a special application recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Production should end a shortage that began in mid-1991 after the last U.S.
SPORTS
April 21, 1993
Fishermen never know what will start the fish biting--warmer weather, dark of the moon--but Lake Perris marina manager Charlie Lamkin notes that a surge in largemouth bass catches coincided when the Riverside County reservoir received a dose of copper sulfate to reduce algae the past week. "Maybe it was just a coincidence," Lamkin said, "but the bass really turned on."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Air pollutants belched out since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution may have offset much of the global warming caused by "greenhouse gases," such as carbon dioxide, researchers said last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1990 | LYNDA NATALI
Engineering scientists at Cal State Long Beach are expected to issue a report soon detailing what has caused the concrete foundations in at least a dozen homes to deteriorate and crack, city officials announced. Since May, 1986, 12 homeowners have had to repair their foundations as a result of the mysterious cracks, said Tony Elmo of the city's Building Department. The most recent repair was needed in January. Initial investigations revealed a high level of sulfates in the soil.
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