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NEWS
February 11, 1989
President Bush, traveling to Canada for his first foreign visit since the inauguration, pledged Friday to negotiate a treaty limiting the emissions that cause acid rain, but he declined to set a timetable or specify the size of the reductions he has in mind. Although Bush's pledge remained vague, Canadian officials accepted it as a major step toward an agreement on acid rain that they have been seeking with the United States since 1979.
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NEWS
February 11, 1989
President Bush, traveling to Canada for his first foreign visit since the inauguration, pledged Friday to negotiate a treaty limiting the emissions that cause acid rain, but he declined to set a timetable or specify the size of the reductions he has in mind. Although Bush's pledge remained vague, Canadian officials accepted it as a major step toward an agreement on acid rain that they have been seeking with the United States since 1979.
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BUSINESS
August 3, 1986 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The Energy Department said it will award government money to nine "clean coal" projects, including one sponsored by an Irvine company, judged to be the most promising methods of reducing harmful air pollutants released by burning coal. The department said the projects, picked from 51 proposals submitted in April, were chosen because they were considered most likely to successfully demonstrate technologies that could be widely used in power plants and industrial boilers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
California's 4-year-old drought will not ease until a volcano erupts at latitudes near the Equator, according to University of Illinois physicist Paul Handler. Volcanic eruptions in that region produce stratospheric dust and sulfur dioxide gas that prevent a small portion of sunlight from reaching the Earth's surface, thereby altering climate in what Handler believes to be highly predictable ways.
NEWS
May 15, 1986 | PETER H. KING, Times Staff Writer
In one of William Saroyan's classic, bittersweet stories about his boyhood here, an advertising expert storms through the San Joaquin Valley promoting a strategy to transform a woeful surplus of raisins into an all-out global conquest: He said after we got America accustomed to eating raisins day in and day out, we would begin to teach Europe and Asia and maybe Australia to eat raisins. China, he said, was swarming with Chinese.
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