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TRAVEL
January 21, 2007
REGARDING "From Soap to Nuts, Allergies Can Make Any Trip a Challenge," Travel Insider, Jan. 7: My daughter is allergic to sulfites, which are a preservative used in many frozen foods, snacks and salad dressings. Wine is the biggest offender. It has natural sulfites that cannot be removed or it would not be wine. We always let the airlines, cruise ships and restaurants know, and they are very nice about it. Sulfites will kill her. SALLY RICHARDSON Tustin
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FOOD
January 6, 2011 | By W. Blake Gray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
This sounds familiar: a national consumer group is fighting to maintain organic standards against industry people who want to weaken them. But when it comes to "organic wine," the well-meaning consumers may actually be discouraging more organic farming. That's because of a quirk in the labeling laws. Currently for a wine to be labeled " USDA Organic" ? a coveted seal of approval for most foods ? it must have no added sulfites. However, most winemakers feel that sulfites are crucial in winemaking ?
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NEWS
December 10, 1987 | Associated Press
Restaurants could no longer use sulfites to preserve fresh potatoes under a ban proposed Wednesday by the Food and Drug Administration. Sulfites were banned last year as a preservative for raw fruits and vegetables, a rule intended primarily to stop their use in salad bars. In proposing to expand that ban, the FDA said four deaths have been linked to exposure to sulfite preservatives used on raw potatoes that subsequently were served by restaurants as hash browns and cottage fries.
TRAVEL
January 21, 2007
REGARDING "From Soap to Nuts, Allergies Can Make Any Trip a Challenge," Travel Insider, Jan. 7: My daughter is allergic to sulfites, which are a preservative used in many frozen foods, snacks and salad dressings. Wine is the biggest offender. It has natural sulfites that cannot be removed or it would not be wine. We always let the airlines, cruise ships and restaurants know, and they are very nice about it. Sulfites will kill her. SALLY RICHARDSON Tustin
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1993 | JULIE TAMAKI
A Granada Hills man was charged Thursday with adding sulfites to meat sold in his Hollywood food market, the Los Angeles city attorney's office said. Estela Nuno Esquivia, 34, owner of Lucky's 7 Market, was named in a two-count criminal complaint filed in Los Angeles Municipal Court, said Mike Qualls, a spokesman for the city attorney. Esquivia faces one count of adding sulfites to food and a count of offering adulterated food for sale.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Treasury Department's Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms has rejected a plea by Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.) and California wineries that new federal sulfite labeling regulations be limited to wines bottled after July 1, officials say. Under current government requirements, sulfite warnings must be placed on all wines shipped after next Jan. 8, regardless of age.
NEWS
December 20, 1988
The Food and Drug Administration, dismissing the concerns of consumer groups, said current restrictions on sulfite preservatives in food are strong enough and further steps are unwarranted. In comments published in the Federal Register, the FDA took the position that all remaining uses of sulfites in foods are generally safe as long as the sulfites are declared on food labels.
NEWS
February 3, 1985 | Associated Press
Sulfite chemicals used to make fresh produce look fresher are so dangerous to a small number of Americans that government action to restrict or ban their use is needed, a scientific advisory committee said Friday. The panel told the Food and Drug Administration that sulfites, which restaurants sometimes spray on fresh fruits, vegetables and some potato products, have been implicated in at least four deaths.
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration said Thursday it will extend a ban on the use of sulfites to include fresh potatoes because of severe allergic reactions to the preservative, including four deaths. The FDA banned use of sulfites on fruit and produce on salad bars in 1986, but potatoes were excluded from the ban. After strong industry lobbying, the FDA decided to study further whether the ban should extend to potatoes.
NEWS
August 30, 1986 | PAUL JACOBS, Times Staff Writer
A ban on the treatment of potatoes with potentially deadly sulfites has been defeated by the Senate after opponents argued that the legislation would damage California agriculture and destroy the state's potato processing industry. The proposal, by Assemblyman Burt Margolin (D-Los Angeles), would have ended the practice of treating freshly cut, non-frozen French fries and hash-brown potatoes for use in restaurants, hospitals and schools with a family of chemical preservatives called sulfites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1993 | JULIE TAMAKI
A Granada Hills man was charged Thursday with adding sulfites to meat sold in his Hollywood food market, the Los Angeles city attorney's office said. Estela Nuno Esquivia, 34, owner of Lucky's 7 Market, was named in a two-count criminal complaint filed in Los Angeles Municipal Court, said Mike Qualls, a spokesman for the city attorney. Esquivia faces one count of adding sulfites to food and a count of offering adulterated food for sale.
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Food and Drug Administration announced it will extend a ban on the use of sulfites to include fresh potatoes because of severe allergic reactions to the preservative, including four deaths. The ban is expected to go into effect in 30 days. In 1986, the FDA banned the use of sulfites on fruit and produce in salad bars but potatoes were excluded from the ban after strong industry lobbying. The agency said it has received nearly 1,000 complaints of adverse reactions to sulfites since 1985.
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration said Thursday it will extend a ban on the use of sulfites to include fresh potatoes because of severe allergic reactions to the preservative, including four deaths. The FDA banned use of sulfites on fruit and produce on salad bars in 1986, but potatoes were excluded from the ban. After strong industry lobbying, the FDA decided to study further whether the ban should extend to potatoes.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The Food and Drug Administration announced a ban today on sulfites on fresh potatoes because the preservatives can trigger potentially fatal allergic reactions. The ban, which goes into effect in 30 days, primarily affects restaurants and restaurant suppliers, which use sulfites to keep peeled potatoes white and firm. The ban follows a 1986 prohibition of sulfites on the fruit and produce in salad bars.
NEWS
December 20, 1988
The Food and Drug Administration, dismissing the concerns of consumer groups, said current restrictions on sulfite preservatives in food are strong enough and further steps are unwarranted. In comments published in the Federal Register, the FDA took the position that all remaining uses of sulfites in foods are generally safe as long as the sulfites are declared on food labels.
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Food and Drug Administration announced it will extend a ban on the use of sulfites to include fresh potatoes because of severe allergic reactions to the preservative, including four deaths. The ban is expected to go into effect in 30 days. In 1986, the FDA banned the use of sulfites on fruit and produce in salad bars but potatoes were excluded from the ban after strong industry lobbying. The agency said it has received nearly 1,000 complaints of adverse reactions to sulfites since 1985.
FOOD
January 23, 1986 | DANIEL P. PUZO, Times Staff Writer
The Food and Drug Administration has issued an unprecedented number of recalls in the past nine months for packaged foods that contain undeclared amounts of sulfites. Since June, 1985, the agency has ordered 15 different national or regional food items removed from store shelves for failing to list the presence of the potentially dangerous preservative on the label. An estimated 1 million Americans are allergic to sulfites, which are used to maintain a food's color and/or clarity.
NEWS
July 21, 1988
An unpublished memo written by the head of the Food and Drug Administration shows the agency wants to reject proposals for broader limitations on sulfite food preservatives, despite estimates that the chemicals can be extremely dangerous to a million or more Americans. A consumer health group said the FDA's failure to act endangers many asthmatics and others who have a severe reaction to sulfites, including the possibility of death within hours after food containing the chemicals is eaten.
FOOD
May 26, 1988 | JOAN DRAKE, Times Staff Writer
Question: Please explain why there's now a notification of sulfites on countless foods and wines. Answer: After conducting a study prompted by reports of 13 deaths and at least 500 allergic reactions attributed to sulfites, the Food and Drug Adminstration banned the use of these preservatives on fresh fruits and vegetables. Another government-imposed restriction requires presence of the chemical in processed foods and beverages to be disclosed on the labels.
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