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NEWS
January 15, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
All life on Earth descended from sulfur-eating bacteria that lived 3.5 billion years ago in near-boiling water and emitted a stench like rotten eggs, according to a new analysis by a controversial UCLA molecular biologist. The bacteria, which were very similar to those that now proliferate around hot-water vents on the ocean floor, were not the first form of life to appear on Earth, James A. Lake reported in a paper in this week's Nature magazine.
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BUSINESS
March 3, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - The Environmental Protection Agency issued final rules Monday to slash the amount of sulfur in gasoline, which would help cut smog-causing pollution from autos and bring the rest of the country's fuel supply in line with California's standards. The new rule for "Tier 3" gasoline calls for reducing the amount of sulfur in fuel by two-thirds, to 10 parts per million from 30 parts per million. Similar low-sulfur gasoline is already in use in California, Europe, Japan and South Korea.
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BUSINESS
March 3, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - The Environmental Protection Agency issued final rules Monday to slash the amount of sulfur in gasoline, which would help cut smog-causing pollution from autos and bring the rest of the country's fuel supply in line with California's standards. The new rule for "Tier 3" gasoline calls for reducing the amount of sulfur in fuel by two-thirds, to 10 parts per million from 30 parts per million. Similar low-sulfur gasoline is already in use in California, Europe, Japan and South Korea.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Monday night on "The Colbert Report," Stephen Colbert addressed a serious topic: global climate change, with a serious guest, Harvard environmental scientist David Keith. As the author of the book, "A Case for Climate Engineering," Keith suggested to Colbert a very simple tactic to combat the steadily warming planet. Have a fleet of planes deposit tons of sulfuric acid into the atmosphere. "Spray pollution into the atmosphere to stop it warming," Keith said. "So in the end, pollution saved them all," Colbert said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1997
A sulfur dust explosion at a Carson chemical plant injured two workers Thursday and forced the company to shut down one of its sulfur grinding units pending an investigation, chemical company officials said. The blast occurred just before 8:30 a.m. at Rhone-Poulenc Basic Chemical on Wilmington Avenue. Plant manager Jim Trafton said the explosion took place in a unit where sulfur is ground up for sale to farmers in Central California.
NATIONAL
April 6, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Easter is Sunday, which means many people need to learn how to properly hard-boil an egg. Emphasis on " properly . " You probably already know how to make hard-boiled eggs the wrong way: Boil the eggs until the kitchen gets stinky with that sulfur-y, rotten-egg smell and you're left with rubbery whites and a distasteful green ring around the yolk. But fear not. This is the Easter when you learn how to properly make hard-boiled eggs, courtesy of the L.A. Times Test Kitchen and Food Editor Russ Parsons.
NEWS
August 30, 1985 | United Press International
A toxic cloud of sulfur dioxide leaked from a chemical plant Thursday, forcing 800 children to flee nearby schools and sickening three persons before dissipating, officials said.
NEWS
August 25, 1989
Reducing industrial sulfur emissions would help restore Northeast lakes damaged by acid rain and would prevent impairment of waterways in the southern Appalachian Mountains, federal researchers said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1992
Talk about bad science, Alexander Cockburn's recent article on clunkers is a classic example, ("A Kind, Clean World for the Clunker," Column Left, March 15). He seems to think that emissions controls on automobiles are some sort of bureaucratic error that let big industry off the hook. Nothing could be further from the truth. Cars and trucks are the primary problem in the Los Angeles Basin. According to the California Air Resources Board, mobile sources emit 56% of all hydrocarbons, 71% of all oxides of nitrogen and 94% of all carbon monoxide; refineries and power plants total 1.9%, 8.7% and 0.5%, respectively.
NEWS
January 20, 2000 | ROBERT SMAUS
Things to do this week: Plant bare root vegetables. Roots of artichoke, asparagus and rhubarb are at nurseries this month, and it's an inexpensive way to plant them. You'll also find transplants of many winter vegetables, such as broccoli and lettuce, plus bulbs of garlic, onion and shallots. This is not a good month to sow seed in the garden because the chilly nights make germination difficult. Spray fruit trees again. Spray deciduous fruit trees--peaches in particular--for the second time this winter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2013 | By Joseph Serna and Robert J. Lopez
About 70 people in Carson were treated for exposure to fumes from sulfuric acid after a machine malfunctioned and leaked the chemical Monday night, the Los Angeles County Fire Department said. Initial reports indicated that about two dozen workers at a business in the 21000 block of South Maciel Avenue were exposed to the fumes, which can irritate the eyes, nose, skin and lungs. However, the number soon swelled to 70 patients, with 13 of them requiring a trip to the hospital, said L.A. County Supervising Dispatcher Robert Diaz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2013 | By Anthony York
SACRAMENTO -- Gov. Jerry Brown on Friday hailed the federal Environmental Protection Agency's embrace of proposed clean-fuel standards to be implemented across the country. "For decades, California has carefully crafted emissions standards to protect the health of people and other living things," Brown said in a statement. "Now the Federal government is joining with us to apply the same standards to the rest of the nation. The result will be improved health for millions of people.
NEWS
November 12, 2012 | By Jon Healey
According to David Keith , a physicist at Harvard, it's a fairly straightforward proposition to reduce the rate of warming on earth, and not all that expensive in the grand scheme of things. One possibility: fly a couple of customized corporate jets into the stratosphere every day and dump a lot of sulfur, creating thin clouds that reflect away some of the sunlight. "The hard questions here really aren't technical," Keith said Monday. "They're fundamentally political. " And the political questions about this sort of environmental manipulation, known in science circles as "geoengineering," are doozies.
NATIONAL
April 6, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Easter is Sunday, which means many people need to learn how to properly hard-boil an egg. Emphasis on " properly . " You probably already know how to make hard-boiled eggs the wrong way: Boil the eggs until the kitchen gets stinky with that sulfur-y, rotten-egg smell and you're left with rubbery whites and a distasteful green ring around the yolk. But fear not. This is the Easter when you learn how to properly make hard-boiled eggs, courtesy of the L.A. Times Test Kitchen and Food Editor Russ Parsons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2010 | By Margot Roosevelt, Los Angeles Times
Eleven major oil refineries and industrial plants in the Los Angeles area will be forced to slash sulfur pollution by more than 2,000 tons a year under sweeping new regulations, but the move may not be enough to meet federal health standards for the region unless the state maintains strict curbs on truck pollution. The new rule, adopted by the South Coast Air Quality Management District, takes aim at airborne sulfur that, along with other pollutants, forms soot. It effectively halves the amount of sulfur oxides that can be emitted in the district, which covers Orange County and major portions of Los Angeles, San Bernardino and Riverside counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2010 | By Steve Chawkins
City officials here call it the "hole from hell." It's 20 feet deep and 100 feet across and at its bottom bubbles a steaming black sulfur-laden pool. It's gobbled up roughly half the parking lot serving City Hall and the town library. At times, its fumes drift over the quaint downtown, clashing with even the boldest Zinfandels in the wine-tasting rooms that line virtually every block. "When the wind is right, it'll clear out your sinuses," said Mayor Duane Picanco as he surveyed the fenced-off chasm that is the last grim souvenir of the San Simeon earthquake of 2003.
NEWS
September 2, 1986 | JERRY BELCHER, Times Staff Writer
About 1,000 people were evacuated from their homes in Culver City early today after a tanker truck carrying 26 tons of molten sulfur jackknifed on the San Diego Freeway, causing a horrendous traffic jam that made thousands of commuters late for work. Ten people, including the truck driver and two Los Angeles City firefighters, were taken to Brotman Memorial Hospital, where they were released after treatment for dizziness and breathing difficulties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2013 | By Anthony York
SACRAMENTO -- Gov. Jerry Brown on Friday hailed the federal Environmental Protection Agency's embrace of proposed clean-fuel standards to be implemented across the country. "For decades, California has carefully crafted emissions standards to protect the health of people and other living things," Brown said in a statement. "Now the Federal government is joining with us to apply the same standards to the rest of the nation. The result will be improved health for millions of people.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2010 | By Patrick Kevin Day
An Australian billboard showing the physical deterioration of a pretty young woman over two years of drug abuse inspired "Daybreakers" creature designer Steven Boyle to give the film's badly mutated "Subsiders" vampires similar characteristics. "When people see the Subsiders, I wanted them to feel pity and disgust before they felt fear," Boyle said. While some of the vampires got away with minimal makeup, performer Bryan Probets had to wear a full-body foam latex suit. Everything was covered except for the inside of his ears and the soles of his feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2009 | David C. Nichols
In the anarchic realm of master provocateur Dario Fo, satire and slapstick are never mutually exclusive, as witnessed by "The Devil With Boobs." In its West Coast premiere at Open Fist Theatre Company, this 1997 allegory weds commedia-inflected hysteria to savage observation, with exceptional results. Written by Fo for his wife, Franca Rame, the title, as translated by Jon Laskin, indicates the narrative thrust, barely. Set during the Renaissance, "Devil" concerns how a master devil tasks his dim apprentice to possess an honest jurist and turn him to debauchery.
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