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Sullivan Bluth Studios

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2008 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Morris F. Sullivan, who ran a financial consulting firm before helping to establish an animation studio in Ireland populated by ex-Disney artists, died Aug. 24 of complications related to old age at his Toluca Lake home, his family said. He was 91. In 1979, three of Disney's top animators -- including Don Bluth -- left the company with a group of artists who felt production values were being compromised for the bottom line. The maverick studio they set up in Van Nuys was struggling financially when a golf partner persuaded the semi-retired Sullivan to step in. The animators screened their 1982 film "The Secret of NIMH" for him, and Sullivan responded: "I'm your guardian angel.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2008 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Morris F. Sullivan, who ran a financial consulting firm before helping to establish an animation studio in Ireland populated by ex-Disney artists, died Aug. 24 of complications related to old age at his Toluca Lake home, his family said. He was 91. In 1979, three of Disney's top animators -- including Don Bluth -- left the company with a group of artists who felt production values were being compromised for the bottom line. The maverick studio they set up in Van Nuys was struggling financially when a golf partner persuaded the semi-retired Sullivan to step in. The animators screened their 1982 film "The Secret of NIMH" for him, and Sullivan responded: "I'm your guardian angel.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Ten years ago--even five years ago--the art of film animation appeared to be going the way of 3-D. Few films were being made, few young artists were studying animation and few people seemed to care very much whether they were made or not. Special effects was the marvel of the '80s, and the legacy of "Star Wars." What kids wanted to see were optical illusions-- laser swords, animatronic aliens, computer-generated pyrotechnics and strange worlds inhabited by real people.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Ten years ago--even five years ago--the art of film animation appeared to be going the way of 3-D. Few films were being made, few young artists were studying animation and few people seemed to care very much whether they were made or not. Special effects was the marvel of the '80s, and the legacy of "Star Wars." What kids wanted to see were optical illusions-- laser swords, animatronic aliens, computer-generated pyrotechnics and strange worlds inhabited by real people.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1988 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The British entertainment company Goldcrest has signed a $40-million deal with animation director Don Bluth and partner Morris Sullivan to produce three animated features at Sullivan Bluth Studios Ireland Ltd.--their Dublin facility--over the next three years. Production is already under way on the first feature, "All Dogs Go to Heaven." Sullivan Bluth's "The Land Before Time Began," will be released this Christmas by Steven Spielberg's Amblin' Productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Twelve years after its initial release, "The Rescuers" (citywide) remains the most entertaining animated feature made at the Disney studio since the death of Walt Disney in 1966. The upbeat story, appealing characters and polished animation have lost none of their appeal. Based on Marjorie Sharp's "Miss Bianca" books, "The Rescuers" tells a story that could be done only in animation.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1992 | CHARLES SOLOMON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Rock-A-Doodle," a new animated feature from the Sullivan Bluth Studios, mixes elements of "Chanticleer," "The Wizard of Oz," backstage musicals and old Elvis movies into a muddled, brightly colored children's entertainment that is considerably less than the sum of its parts. It's not infuriatingly bad, the way the product-driven cartoons of the early '80s were, but the dutiful adult who decides to watch "Rock-A-Doodle" (citywide) with his kids is signing up for a long, effortful afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1988 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Parents may have a hard time scraping dinosaur goo off the young ones they take to "The Land Before Time," (citywide) a fatally cunning animation feature set back when the earth really moved. Having dinosaurs, a whole array of different species, as central characters is an interesting challenge. Their size and the relative mystery about their disappearance still carry an almost primal fascination.
BUSINESS
February 8, 1991 | JANE APPLEGATE
Sometimes an offbeat location can be the secret ingredient for business success. "Despite the shortcomings of our facility--it's old, small, run-down and crowded--people are delighted we are here," said Paul Novograd, owner of Claremont Riding Academy, which is next to a vacant lot in a less-than-tony Manhattan neighborhood. Beginning at 6 a.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1989 | JACK MATHEWS
Early in Don Bluth's "All Dogs Go to Heaven," as the deceased junkyard dog Charlie is being welcomed by an angelic whippet at the gates of heaven, the camera pans past a batch of clocks hanging suspended above the clouds. On the face of just one of them is the small but instantly recognizable silhouette of Mickey Mouse. Nice touch. Not only is it a comfort to know that Mickey will always be there for us, but it's a spicy bit of homage from the Disney animators who 10 years ago shocked their elders by walking out on Mickey, Minnie and the rest of the animated cast at Walt Disney Productions, complaining that the studio had lost its way with classical animation.
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