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Sullivan Canyon

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
The Los Angeles Unified School District has won the latest round in a battle over an eight-acre canyon property it owns in Brentwood. A Superior Court judge in Los Angeles ruled this week that the district does not have to sell the property to a parks consortium that last year bid $2 million for it. The decision allows the financially troubled district to offer the Sullivan Canyon land to other possible buyers for what its officials say could be as much as $17 million.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2008 | Liam Gowing
It WAS somewhere between spotting the hefty tree trunk lying across Sullivan Canyon Trail and actually running into it that I realized I was in trouble. But it wasn't until I had flipped over my bike's handlebars and into a one-armed handstand that I experienced my moment of clarity. The epiphany was simple: "I should have worn gloves." Gloves have the distinct advantage of not bleeding the way my scraped-up right palm did moments later.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2008 | Liam Gowing
It WAS somewhere between spotting the hefty tree trunk lying across Sullivan Canyon Trail and actually running into it that I realized I was in trouble. But it wasn't until I had flipped over my bike's handlebars and into a one-armed handstand that I experienced my moment of clarity. The epiphany was simple: "I should have worn gloves." Gloves have the distinct advantage of not bleeding the way my scraped-up right palm did moments later.
OPINION
July 17, 2002
Re "Spielbergs Keep Brentwood Range Open," July 9: Anyone who visits Sullivan Canyon for the first time has pretty much the same reaction as our friend did when she came down with her daughter last week: "This is amazing," she said. "It's like leaving the city behind." Open space is a scarce commodity in L.A.; we tend to think of it as houses waiting to happen. But Steven Spielberg and Kate Capshaw's donation of the funds needed to purchase Sullivan Canyon guarantees that one of the last public recreation areas on the city's Westside will remain just that--open and available to people who would like to catch their breath without having to leave town.
OPINION
July 17, 2002
Re "Spielbergs Keep Brentwood Range Open," July 9: Anyone who visits Sullivan Canyon for the first time has pretty much the same reaction as our friend did when she came down with her daughter last week: "This is amazing," she said. "It's like leaving the city behind." Open space is a scarce commodity in L.A.; we tend to think of it as houses waiting to happen. But Steven Spielberg and Kate Capshaw's donation of the funds needed to purchase Sullivan Canyon guarantees that one of the last public recreation areas on the city's Westside will remain just that--open and available to people who would like to catch their breath without having to leave town.
OPINION
June 14, 1998
Those special places where there are no streets are supposed to be refuges from the stress of urban living. But in some neighborhoods in the Santa Monica Mountains, complaints about visitors to adjacent wilderness illustrate how fraught the transition from concrete to chaparral can be. Most recently, Los Angeles city officials responded to complaints from residents near Sullivan Canyon in Brentwood by imposing severe parking restrictions near a few popular trail heads.
NEWS
April 21, 1994 | SCOTT SHIBUYA BROWN
Residents will have the opportunity to comment on plans for 210 acres of canyon land in Brentwood and Pacific Palisades, the last major undeveloped tracts in the area, at public hearings today and Saturday. After more than six months of gathering community input, Community Development by Design, a park planning firm, will unveil 19 proposed uses for the land, including botanical gardens, equestrian areas and playing fields.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1989 | ALAN C. MILLER AND AMY PYLE, Times Staff Writers
A complex land swap that could help meet Los Angeles' pressing needs for a new landfill and more electrical power, transform dilapidated Hansen Dam into a major recreation area and preserve scenic canyons in the Santa Monica Mountains is under serious negotiation by federal, city, county and private interests. The outlines of the sweeping plan were contained in a bill introduced in Congress by Rep. Howard L. Berman (D-Panorama City) in February.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1991 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy said Wednesday that his agency has negotiated a deal that will give it eventual ownership of 1,500 acres around Mandeville Canyon south of Encino, effectively checkmating efforts to build a garbage dump in three nearby canyons. However, a Los Angeles County landfill official and the landowner said it is by no means clear that the conservancy can carry off its plan to prevent establishment of a dump in Mission, Rustic and Sullivan canyons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1990 | MYRON LEVIN and STEVE PADILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Four mountain canyons ringing the San Fernando and Santa Clarita valleys are environmentally suitable for use as landfills, according to a county report to be released today that suggests that at least three of them eventually will have to become dumps to solve Los Angeles County's waste disposal problems. The draft environmental impact report appears to set the stage for increasingly heated conflicts over the future of the rustic land, pitting dump proponents against parkland supporters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
The Los Angeles Unified School District has won the latest round in a battle over an eight-acre canyon property it owns in Brentwood. A Superior Court judge in Los Angeles ruled this week that the district does not have to sell the property to a parks consortium that last year bid $2 million for it. The decision allows the financially troubled district to offer the Sullivan Canyon land to other possible buyers for what its officials say could be as much as $17 million.
OPINION
June 14, 1998
Those special places where there are no streets are supposed to be refuges from the stress of urban living. But in some neighborhoods in the Santa Monica Mountains, complaints about visitors to adjacent wilderness illustrate how fraught the transition from concrete to chaparral can be. Most recently, Los Angeles city officials responded to complaints from residents near Sullivan Canyon in Brentwood by imposing severe parking restrictions near a few popular trail heads.
NEWS
April 21, 1994 | SCOTT SHIBUYA BROWN
Residents will have the opportunity to comment on plans for 210 acres of canyon land in Brentwood and Pacific Palisades, the last major undeveloped tracts in the area, at public hearings today and Saturday. After more than six months of gathering community input, Community Development by Design, a park planning firm, will unveil 19 proposed uses for the land, including botanical gardens, equestrian areas and playing fields.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1991 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy said Wednesday that his agency has negotiated a deal that will give it eventual ownership of 1,500 acres around Mandeville Canyon south of Encino, effectively checkmating efforts to build a garbage dump in three nearby canyons. However, a Los Angeles County landfill official and the landowner said it is by no means clear that the conservancy can carry off its plan to prevent establishment of a dump in Mission, Rustic and Sullivan canyons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1990 | MYRON LEVIN and STEVE PADILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Four mountain canyons ringing the San Fernando and Santa Clarita valleys are environmentally suitable for use as landfills, according to a county report to be released today that suggests that at least three of them eventually will have to become dumps to solve Los Angeles County's waste disposal problems. The draft environmental impact report appears to set the stage for increasingly heated conflicts over the future of the rustic land, pitting dump proponents against parkland supporters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1989 | ALAN C. MILLER AND AMY PYLE, Times Staff Writers
A complex land swap that could help meet Los Angeles' pressing needs for a new landfill and more electrical power, transform dilapidated Hansen Dam into a major recreation area and preserve scenic canyons in the Santa Monica Mountains is under serious negotiation by federal, city, county and private interests. The outlines of the sweeping plan were contained in a bill introduced in Congress by Rep. Howard L. Berman (D-Panorama City) in February.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1989 | JOHN McKINNEY
Sullivan Canyon above Brentwood is one of the gems of the eastern portion of the Santa Monica Mountains. Stately oaks and sycamores shade a seasonal creek and a fine trail travels the length of the canyon. The canyon also is attractive to its owner--the Los Angeles County Sanitation District--albeit for other than aesthetic reasons. Sullivan and its neighbor, Rustic Canyon, have long been proposed as landfill sites. Protests by environmentalists have thus far derailed the dump, so at least for now, Sullivan Canyon is a beautiful place to roam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2000
The Los Angeles Unified School District is still throwing money away, in this case by leasing out a choice piece of its property in the Santa Monica Mountains at a huge loss. A private riding club pays a measly $16,000 a year for the lease, and the district's property tax bill is more than triple that amount. This sweetheart deal is especially galling at a time when the district can't find enough land or money to build new schools. An outraged Supt.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1989 | JOHN McKINNEY
Sullivan Canyon above Brentwood is one of the gems of the eastern portion of the Santa Monica Mountains. Stately oaks and sycamores shade a seasonal creek and a fine trail travels the length of the canyon. The canyon also is attractive to its owner--the Los Angeles County Sanitation District--albeit for other than aesthetic reasons. Sullivan and its neighbor, Rustic Canyon, have long been proposed as landfill sites. Protests by environmentalists have thus far derailed the dump, so at least for now, Sullivan Canyon is a beautiful place to roam.
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