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Sullivan Principles

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BUSINESS
August 5, 1987
The Sullivan principles call for U.S. companies doing business in South Africa to: Ensure non-segregation of the races in all work facilities. Implement equal and fair employment practices for all workers. Develop training programs that will prepare nonwhites for supervisory, administrative, clerical and technical jobs. Increase the number of nonwhites in management and supervisory positions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2001 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Leon Howard Sullivan, one of the first African Americans to sit on the board of a major American corporation and the author of what came to be known as the Sullivan Principles, a code of conduct for American businesses in dealing with the apartheid government of South Africa, died Tuesday night of leukemia. He was 78. In ill health for some time, Sullivan died in a Scottsdale hospital.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2001 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Leon Howard Sullivan, one of the first African Americans to sit on the board of a major American corporation and the author of what came to be known as the Sullivan Principles, a code of conduct for American businesses in dealing with the apartheid government of South Africa, died Tuesday night of leukemia. He was 78. In ill health for some time, Sullivan died in a Scottsdale hospital.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1987
The Sullivan principles call for U.S. companies doing business in South Africa to: Ensure non-segregation of the races in all work facilities. Implement equal and fair employment practices for all workers. Develop training programs that will prepare nonwhites for supervisory, administrative, clerical and technical jobs. Increase the number of nonwhites in management and supervisory positions.
NEWS
March 22, 1986 | ANNE C. ROARK, Times Education Writer
The University of California Board of Regents announced Friday that the university will sell $12.3-million worth of bonds issued by Eaton Corp. because the Cleveland-based manufacturer has failed to meet the university's standard of "good corporate citizenship" in South Africa. The planned sale, which represents only a tiny fraction of UC's $2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1986 | THOMAS OMESTAD, Times Staff Writer
California Lutheran University, a private institution in Thousand Oaks with 2,350 students, has sold the last of its stock in companies doing business in South Africa in a move aimed at condemning apartheid. About $50,000 in Chevron Corp. stock was sold after the school's Board of Regents on Jan. 11 endorsed full divestment of stocks in firms doing business in the racially divided nation, university President Jerry H. Miller said Tuesday.
NEWS
June 3, 1987 | Associated Press
The Rev. Leon H. Sullivan, author of a widely used code of conduct for American businesses in South Africa, called on all U.S. corporations today to pull out of that nation within nine months and for President Reagan to break diplomatic relations. Sullivan, a Philadelphia minister, said in an impassioned speech that he wants all American businesses to withdraw and the U.S.
NEWS
June 26, 1986
By a vote of 150 for and 268 against, the House rejected an amendment to soften proposed U.S. economic sanctions against the white-minority government of South Africa. The amendment sought to exempt from the sanctions any South African-based company, American or foreign, that abides by the fair-employment code developed by Philadelphia minister Leon Sullivan. Employers under the Sullivan principles must provide non-discriminatory working and housing conditions.
NEWS
September 19, 1985 | LYNDON STAMBLER, Times Staff Writer
The Santa Monica City Council unanimously approved a divestiture policy that will prevent the city from investing in banks and companies doing business with South Africa but will have little immediate impact on the city's total investments of $90.1 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1985
The naivete of your editorial on disinvesting from firms doing business in South Africa is astonishing. I am tempted to call it disingenuous, if not dishonest. First of all, do you really think that American businesses operating in South Africa are there as social reformers, rather than profit-making enterprises? You say nothing about the 230 or so U.S. corporations that have not signed the recently stiffened Sullivan Principles. What are we going to do about them? And secondly, the 119 companies you applaud for having signed the principles are still profiting from apartheid's machinery of oppression.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1987 | CECILIE DITLEV-SIMONSEN, Times Staff Writer
Early last year, conservative students at picturesque Dartmouth College disturbed the peaceful atmosphere of the New Hampshire campus by swinging sledgehammers to destroy a shantytown erected by campus protesters opposed to the school's investments in companies doing business in South Africa.
NEWS
June 4, 1987 | Associated Press
The Rev. Leon H. Sullivan, saying his widely used fair-employment principles have failed to bring an end to South Africa's apartheid, called on nearly 200 American businesses Wednesday to pull out of that nation within nine months. Sullivan, a Philadelphia Baptist minister whose 10-year-old code of conduct has become the standard for U.S. companies in South Africa, also said he wants the U.S. government to enact an economic embargo against South Africa.
NEWS
June 3, 1987 | Associated Press
The Rev. Leon H. Sullivan, author of a widely used code of conduct for American businesses in South Africa, called on all U.S. corporations today to pull out of that nation within nine months and for President Reagan to break diplomatic relations. Sullivan, a Philadelphia minister, said in an impassioned speech that he wants all American businesses to withdraw and the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1986
By a vote of 150 for and 268 against, the House rejected an amendment to soften proposed U.S. economic sanctions against the white-minority government of South Africa. The amendment sought to exempt from the sanctions any South African-based company, American or foreign, that abides by the fair-employment code developed by Philadelphia minister Leon Sullivan. Employers under the Sullivan principles must provide non-discriminatory working and housing conditions.
NEWS
March 22, 1986 | ANNE C. ROARK, Times Education Writer
The University of California Board of Regents announced Friday that the university will sell $12.3-million worth of bonds issued by Eaton Corp. because the Cleveland-based manufacturer has failed to meet the university's standard of "good corporate citizenship" in South Africa. The planned sale, which represents only a tiny fraction of UC's $2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1986 | THOMAS OMESTAD, Times Staff Writer
California Lutheran University, a private institution in Thousand Oaks with 2,350 students, has sold the last of its stock in companies doing business in South Africa in a move aimed at condemning apartheid. About $50,000 in Chevron Corp. stock was sold after the school's Board of Regents on Jan. 11 endorsed full divestment of stocks in firms doing business in the racially divided nation, university President Jerry H. Miller said Tuesday.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1987 | CECILIE DITLEV-SIMONSEN, Times Staff Writer
Early last year, conservative students at picturesque Dartmouth College disturbed the peaceful atmosphere of the New Hampshire campus by swinging sledgehammers to destroy a shantytown erected by campus protesters opposed to the school's investments in companies doing business in South Africa.
NEWS
September 19, 1985 | LYNDON STAMBLER, Times Staff Writer
The Santa Monica City Council unanimously approved a divestiture policy that will prevent the city from investing in banks and companies doing business with South Africa but will have little immediate impact on the city's total investments of $90.1 million.
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