Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSultan Mccullough
IN THE NEWS

Sultan Mccullough

FEATURED ARTICLES
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
November 22, 2002 | Gary Klein
USC played its homecoming game last week. Trojan running back Sultan McCullough will play a personal one on Saturday. McCullough, a senior tailback from Pasadena, played three games in the Rose Bowl for Pasadena Muir High. In 2000, he rushed for 105 yards and scored a touchdown in 26 carries for USC in a 38-35 victory over UCLA. "I'll have a lot of people there watching," McCullough said Thursday. "I'm looking forward to having a couple big runs."
Advertisement
SPORTS
September 15, 1999 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fastest player in USC football history has a woman's name tattooed on his chest in letters four inches high: MABLE. "My mom's the biggest thing in my life," tailback Sultan McCullough said. "That's why I wanted it so big." Never mind that his mother spells her name Mabel, though she says she sometimes spells it differently. "It doesn't really matter," she said with a laugh. "That's my baby. He's such a sweet young man, it was a joy.
SPORTS
October 17, 2002 | Gary Klein, Times Staff Writer
It has been almost 35 years since former USC coach John McKay said it, but his simple logic endures. Asked why tailback O.J. Simpson carried the ball so often for the Trojans, McKay famously quipped: "Why not? It isn't very heavy." Sultan McCullough can attest to that. McCullough cradled the ball a career-high 39 times Saturday against California, the most by a Trojan running back in 15 years.
SPORTS
August 31, 2000 | JIM HODGES
The problem when you're as fast as Sultan McCullough is that you think you can run away from anything, that speed is the answer to everything. And then USC coaches give you the ball and tell you to get it through that sliver of an opening between two 300-pounders wrestling with two other 300-pounders. Logic says such a move makes no sense. Get it outside, away from the beef. "He had to learn," USC running back coach Kennedy Pola said Wednesday.
SPORTS
November 1, 2001 | Ben Bolch
USC tailback Sultan McCullough will sit out his third consecutive game when the Trojans play Oregon State on Saturday at the Coliseum, but he has not decided whether to undergo surgery for his strained abdomen, USC Coach Pete Carroll said Wednesday. McCullough, the Trojans' leading rusher with 410 yards in six games, has not played since re-aggravating the injury against Arizona State on Oct. 13.
SPORTS
November 22, 2002 | Gary Klein
USC played its homecoming game last week. Trojan running back Sultan McCullough will play a personal one on Saturday. McCullough, a senior tailback from Pasadena, played three games in the Rose Bowl for Pasadena Muir High. In 2000, he rushed for 105 yards and scored a touchdown in 26 carries for USC in a 38-35 victory over UCLA. "I'll have a lot of people there watching," McCullough said Thursday. "I'm looking forward to having a couple big runs."
SPORTS
October 17, 2002 | Gary Klein, Times Staff Writer
It has been almost 35 years since former USC coach John McKay said it, but his simple logic endures. Asked why tailback O.J. Simpson carried the ball so often for the Trojans, McKay famously quipped: "Why not? It isn't very heavy." Sultan McCullough can attest to that. McCullough cradled the ball a career-high 39 times Saturday against California, the most by a Trojan running back in 15 years.
SPORTS
September 11, 1999 | ROBYN NORWOOD
It looked like showdown time Friday at Howard Jones Field, with tailback Sultan McCullough and receiver Kareem Kelly ready to see if Kelly could unseat McCullough as the fastest player in USC history. But Coach Paul Hackett put an end to their yapping, calling off the race until spring. "Can you imagine? The last race Sultan competed in he kicked it into high gear and nearly popped his hamstring," Hackett said. "Are we really worried if they're fast enough? I know already."
SPORTS
November 5, 2000 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Earlier in the season, Sultan McCullough was getting antsy. Though he ran for more than 100 yards in two of USC's first three games, the sophomore tailback wasn't breaking any long runs. He has solved that problem in recent weeks. His 51-yard touchdown run in the first quarter against Arizona State on Saturday marked the fourth consecutive game that he has had a scoring run of 29 yards or longer. McCullough said it was a matter of remaining patient, knowing the big plays would come along.
SPORTS
October 14, 2002 | Rob Fernas, Times Staff Writer
Like that white horse familiar to USC fans, the Trojan running game galloped into the Coliseum on Saturday and rekindled a sense of power and pride. It was a brief flashback to past triumphs, when USC routinely ran the ball down the throats of opponents behind what seemed like an endless procession of stellar tailbacks -- Garrett, Simpson, Bell, White, Allen. But as any USC fan can attest, the running game has been more miss than hit in recent seasons.
SPORTS
October 13, 2002 | Gary Klein, Times Staff Writer
The game plan was simple, if somewhat antiquated for USC. The Trojans intended to run over, run past and run through California regardless of circumstance Saturday at the Coliseum. Sultan McCullough was the primary beneficiary of the pass-happy Trojans' change in scheme and the senior tailback did not disappoint.
SPORTS
August 23, 2002 | GARY KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
USC tailback Sultan McCullough switched numbers four times in the last week while waiting for his left hamstring to heal. McCullough's No. 4 practice jersey was too large, so he donned 19, 46, even Marcus Allen's retired No. 33 while he paced the sideline and sat on the trainer's table as teammate after teammate joined the injured list. On Thursday, McCullough wore No. 2 as he began his push to become the Trojans' No. 1 tailback.
SPORTS
August 15, 2002 | GARY KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
USC running back Sultan McCullough, battling transfer Justin Fargas for a starting job, said Wednesday he intends to seek outside medical treatment for a sore left hamstring because the condition is not improving. McCullough, a senior who gained 1,163 yards two years ago, was mostly on the sidelines as Fargas took the majority of repetitions during two-a-day practices Tuesday and Wednesday. "I don't know what to do," McCullough said. "I keep going to therapy, but ice is not working.
SPORTS
November 1, 2001 | Ben Bolch
USC tailback Sultan McCullough will sit out his third consecutive game when the Trojans play Oregon State on Saturday at the Coliseum, but he has not decided whether to undergo surgery for his strained abdomen, USC Coach Pete Carroll said Wednesday. McCullough, the Trojans' leading rusher with 410 yards in six games, has not played since re-aggravating the injury against Arizona State on Oct. 13.
SPORTS
November 24, 2000 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each time Sultan McCullough touches the ball, he has something to prove. The USC tailback wants people to watch him and think of something special. He wants them to think of his older brother. Saladin--not Sultan--was the natural-born football player in the McCullough family, the one with all the moves, the one expected to become the next great Trojan runner. Somewhere along the way, he stumbled.
SPORTS
October 13, 2002 | Gary Klein, Times Staff Writer
The game plan was simple, if somewhat antiquated for USC. The Trojans intended to run over, run past and run through California regardless of circumstance Saturday at the Coliseum. Sultan McCullough was the primary beneficiary of the pass-happy Trojans' change in scheme and the senior tailback did not disappoint.
SPORTS
November 8, 2000 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carson Palmer was smiling in the huddle. His USC team was on a five-game losing streak and had just blown a 29-point lead to Arizona State, turning an easy victory into a nail biter. The Trojans had no earthly reason to believe they would win. Yet, heading into overtime, their quarterback was smiling. "I don't know what it was," Palmer said. "Everyone on our team had this feeling." The Trojans won and, in the process, offered the slightest glimmer of hope.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|