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Sultan

TRAVEL
July 9, 2000 | NORM ZARESKI, Norm Zareski is a photographer and writer who lives in Palo Verdes Estates
A mere 30 years ago this country had no tourist trade, only a few miles of paved roads, a single power plant and scant phone service. People walking in the dark carried lanterns lest they be shot as thieves, and this city's wooden gates were closed to outsiders after dark. My wife, Susan, and I knew times had changed, but upon arrival last December, we were pleasantly surprised at what we found: a clean, pleasant and progressive nation that welcomes travelers.
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NEWS
February 25, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Brunei's government said it has begun legal proceedings against the younger brother of the sultan, freezing his assets and accusing him of improper use of state funds. The prime minister's office in the tiny sultanate in Southeast Asia said the proceedings against Prince Jefri came after an investigation into the huge losses suffered by Amedeo Development Corp., the country's largest private company. Jefri denied the allegations in a statement.
NEWS
December 15, 1999 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There once was a boy who was shunned by his wealthy and powerful father. He was sent to a foreign land to be educated. To support himself, he had to join a foreign army. When at last his father sent for him, the young man hurried home full of expectations--only to learn he was to be kept out of sight. It was an unpromising beginning to an Arabian tale, but it has had a happy ending for the boy, now known as Sultan Kaboos ibn Said, supreme ruler of the Sultanate of Oman, and especially for his 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1999 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Acoustic Bluesfest '99, originally slated to be held at Cafe Voltaire's new location at Ash and Main streets in Ventura, will move across the street to the Elks Lodge. And from here on out, the only music to be heard at Cafe Voltaire will be "The Sounds of Silence"--without Simon & Garfunkel. On the face of it, acoustic music shouldn't fluster anyone, but a few weeks ago police shut down a show by the Tatters, an acoustic group featuring a trio of female singers.
NEWS
September 29, 1998 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former Palm Springs neurologist was ordered Monday to provide 3,000 hours of free medical care to residents of a poor urban neighborhood as punishment for bilking Medicare out of $120,000. Dr. Isaac Sultan could have received up to 21 months in prison under a plea agreement with prosecutors, but Los Angeles federal Judge Dickran Tevrizian said "warehousing" him in prison for that length of time would serve no useful purpose.
NEWS
September 15, 1998
Teams from law enforcement agencies across Southern California battled Monday for the title as top SWAT unit. The competition was tough, leaving precious little room for error. Monday was the fifth year Ventura has hosted the competition, designed to test the skills of these highly trained units in areas such as shooting, physical fitness and responding to emergency calls.
SPORTS
August 16, 1998 | SHAV GLICK
Babe Ruth died 50 years ago today. On the day he was buried, it was hot and steamy, a sweaty August in New York. Two of the pallbearers were old teammates, Joe Dugan and Waite Hoyt. As he lifted the casket, Dugan, suffering in the heat, reportedly said to Hoyt, "I'd give a hundred bucks for an ice-cold beer." Hoyt smiled and glanced at the coffin. "So would the Babe," he said. "So would the Babe."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Television specials this weekend encompass a musical tribute to Skitch Henderson, a live voyage to the Titanic's hull and a heartfelt celebration of the one and only Babe Ruth. PBS' "Skitch Henderson at 80," Saturday at 8 p.m. on KCET-TV Channel 28, celebrates the 80th birthday of the New York Pops conductor. Mike Wallace and columnist Liz Smith host. Performers include Isaac Stern, Harolyn Blackwell and Steve Allen. The Discovery Channel's two-hour "Titanic Live" excursion, Sunday at 5 p.m.
SPORTS
July 19, 1998 | BILL PLASCHKE
Fittingly for the timeless sport whose language he brings to life, Paul Dickson's book began between innings. While waiting for the pitcher to warm up. With a conversation between a father and his sons. "I'm sitting there with my two boys and they start asking me questions about the strange words they heard," he recalled of that day in Baltimore's Memorial Stadium. "They asked things like, 'Why do they call it a bunt?' " Strange words, unimaginable meanings.
NEWS
May 7, 1998
Guy Dyer McGonagill, 71, a fixture on the Santa Monica beach. Born, raised and educated within sight of the sand, McGonagill was a wrestler at Santa Monica High School and quickly became a lifeguard. He served with the Marines in World War II and the Korean War, and earned a teaching degree at Cal State Northridge but never used it.
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