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NEWS
April 12, 2013 | By Terry Gardner
An 8-week-old female Sumatran tiger cub makes her debut Friday (today) at the San Francisco Zoo .  Visitors are encouraged to “walk softly” (without a big stick) because the cub might hide if she hears a loud noise.  The cub, born Feb. 10, now weighs almost 14 pounds. Her birth and 9 1/2-year-old Leanne's pregnancy was closely watched . The cub's naming rights will be auctioned at a May 11 zoo fundraiser. I asked Corinne MacDonald, the zoo's curator of carnivores and primates, whether Leanne was different with her girl cub. Leanne had three male cubs in 2008.
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NEWS
November 6, 2013 | By Lindsay Barnett
Three-month-old Sumatran tiger siblings' swimming skills were tested by staff Wednesday at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C. The cubs, a male named Bandar and a female named Sukacita, both passed what the zoo termed a "swim reliability test" that is conducted on all cubs before they are cleared to appear in the zoo's Great Cats exhibit. The exhibit is surrounded by a moat, so it's important for the cubs' safety that they master basic skills such as keeping their heads above the surface of the water and pulling themselves out of the moat.
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NEWS
March 15, 2009 | Zakki Hakim, Hakim writes for the Associated Press.
Indonesia's tiger catchers have a double job -- protecting humans from tigers, and tigers from humans. The elite teams of rangers and conservationists rush to the scene every time villagers report attacks or sightings of critically endangered Sumatran tigers. First, they calm the people. Then, if there are signs that the animal is nearby, they return with steel cage traps, live bait, heat-sensitive cameras and other equipment to capture the magnificent beasts. This time, Sartono, who at 40 has spent nearly half of his life in the job, arrives with his six-member squad at a remote oil palm plantation in Sungai Gelam district, 375 miles west of the capital, Jakarta, knowing they will have to act fast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013 | By Andrew Blankstein
Federal prosecutors charged half a dozen Southern Californians in five cases stemming from their alleged efforts to sell endangered species and animal parts over the Internet, including pelts from endangered Sumatran tigers, authorities said Thursday. The case grew out of "Operation Wild Web," a joint effort by U.S. and foreign law enforcement agencies to disrupt illegal wildlife trafficking on auction-oriented websites. Those charged include Hanna Karim, 44, and his wife, Margarita Licomitros, 36, both of Huntington Beach, who are accused of selling a Sumatran tiger skin for $8,000 after the item was advertised on Craigslist.
NEWS
November 8, 1985 | From Reuters
Sumatran village officials have asked the central government to provide tranquilizer guns to use on rogue herds of hungry rampaging elephants. Officials said south Sumatran villages have been plagued by elephants that descend on them after dark, devouring rice, bananas, corn and coconuts and smashing anything in their way. The herds have escaped from reservations where they were driven last year and appear to have developed a new-found taste for rice, the officials said.
NEWS
July 5, 1986 | From Reuters
Six people died and more than 2,500 were left homeless by floods that hit 28 villages in the Sumatran district of Wonosobo, local officials report. The floods destroyed 500 acres of rice crops and damaged coffee plantations, although traders in Jakarta said most of the district's coffee had been harvested.
NEWS
May 27, 2013 | By Terry Gardner
The San Francisco Zoo's 3-month-old Sumatran tiger cub finally has a name: Jillian.  Born Feb. 10, the cub now eats solid food and weighs almost 30 pounds. On May 11, at Zoofest, the nonprofit zoo's annual fundraiser, comedian Robin Williams assisted in auctioning off naming rights to the cub. Literary agent Jillian Manus won the naming rights to the cub with a $47,000 donation to the zoo.  “I was going to donate a certain amount of money anyway and my kids started texting me: 'Get the baby tiger,'” says Jillian Manus.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1988 | JOHN HENKEN
In many ways, Indonesia is a melting pot to rival the United States. Influences from China to the Middle East could be seen and heard in the Sumatran music and dance presented Thursday evening at CalArts by Sangrina Bunda, the Jakarta National Dance Theatre of Indonesia. Making its first U.S. tour, the company was bedeviled by production problems and the very real limitations of the CalArts Main Gallery as a formal dance venue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013 | By Andrew Blankstein
Federal prosecutors charged half a dozen Southern Californians in five cases stemming from their alleged efforts to sell endangered species and animal parts over the Internet, including pelts from endangered Sumatran tigers, authorities said Thursday. The case grew out of "Operation Wild Web," a joint effort by U.S. and foreign law enforcement agencies to disrupt illegal wildlife trafficking on auction-oriented websites. Those charged include Hanna Karim, 44, and his wife, Margarita Licomitros, 36, both of Huntington Beach, who are accused of selling a Sumatran tiger skin for $8,000 after the item was advertised on Craigslist.
MAGAZINE
November 8, 1987 | BARBARA HANSEN, Hansen is a Times staff writer.
Spicy food is in vogue, and our trendiest restaurants are heating up as chefs experiment with bold seasonings. Here we present unusual dishes from India, Indonesia and Mexico Some like it hot. But some like it even hotter. Spicy food is in vogue--and not only at the neighborhood Thai cafe or the corner taco stand. The trendiest restaurants are heating up as chefs experiment with bold seasonings borrowed from exotic cuisines. Southern California is a logical site for such innovation.
NEWS
May 27, 2013 | By Terry Gardner
The San Francisco Zoo's 3-month-old Sumatran tiger cub finally has a name: Jillian.  Born Feb. 10, the cub now eats solid food and weighs almost 30 pounds. On May 11, at Zoofest, the nonprofit zoo's annual fundraiser, comedian Robin Williams assisted in auctioning off naming rights to the cub. Literary agent Jillian Manus won the naming rights to the cub with a $47,000 donation to the zoo.  “I was going to donate a certain amount of money anyway and my kids started texting me: 'Get the baby tiger,'” says Jillian Manus.
NEWS
April 12, 2013 | By Terry Gardner
An 8-week-old female Sumatran tiger cub makes her debut Friday (today) at the San Francisco Zoo .  Visitors are encouraged to “walk softly” (without a big stick) because the cub might hide if she hears a loud noise.  The cub, born Feb. 10, now weighs almost 14 pounds. Her birth and 9 1/2-year-old Leanne's pregnancy was closely watched . The cub's naming rights will be auctioned at a May 11 zoo fundraiser. I asked Corinne MacDonald, the zoo's curator of carnivores and primates, whether Leanne was different with her girl cub. Leanne had three male cubs in 2008.
SCIENCE
September 27, 2012 | By Monte Morin, Los Angeles Times
Planet Earth may be 4.5 billion years old, but that doesn't mean it can't serve up a shattering surprise now and again. Such was the case on April 11 when two massive earthquakes erupted beneath the Indian Ocean off the coast of the Indonesian island of Sumatra, far from the usual danger zones. Now scientists say the seafloor ruptures are part of a long suspected, yet never before observed, event: the slow-motion splitting of a vast tectonic plate. The first of the quakes, a magnitude 8.7, was 20 times more powerful than California's long anticipated "big one" and tore a complex network of faults deep in the ocean floor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2011 | By Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times
People who love the Los Angeles Zoo get excited about any new animal — be it tiger cub, former circus elephant or Komodo dragon hatchling. So imagine the thrill of 66 new arrivals at one time, among them a Channel Island fox, a baby rhinoceros, a lioness, three racehorses and … a unicorn. All the animals, including the mythical one, have found a home in the zoo's newest habitat — the Tom Mankiewicz Conservation Carousel, which will open to the public Oct. 27. PHOTOS: Colorful carousel The hope is that the colorful new attraction will be a big draw and — at $3 for a three-minute ride — generate cash for the zoo for years to come.
WORLD
November 2, 2009 | John M. Glionna
The monkey, shackled to an iron stake, paced a narrow strip of dirt filled with its own excrement. As people laughed and pointed, the creature bared its teeth and lunged at the end of its line. "He gets angry," said one trader at the teeming animal market here. "Like a little person." Irma Hermawati gets angry too. The 31-year-old Javanese native is an investigator for the nonprofit group ProFauna, which lobbies on behalf of what she believes is Indonesia's most precious resource: its indigenous wildlife.
WORLD
October 31, 2009 | John M. Glionna
They're equatorial Huckleberry Finns, two wild-hearted boys guiding an old wooden fishing boat along a wide and mighty river. Fandi and Alfan, brothers with one name each, live in a remote village in the heart of the Sumatran jungle, at once a protected and dangerous place to be a child. Most mornings they rise before their rooster crows, bolting down a meager breakfast of coconut and chile-spiced vegetables over rice before venturing out on their journey: rowing to school aboard a hand-carved 15-foot sampan.
TRAVEL
January 13, 1991 | SCOTT DOGGETT
Getting there: Garuda Indonesia offers flights four times weekly from Los Angeles to Jakarta, and several flights daily from Jakarta to Bengkulu. Round-trip air fare is $1,486. A visa is required. Call (800) 342-7832. When to go: September through October is the best time. Avoid monsoon season, from December through February, when torrential rains make road travel extremely dangerous. For more information: Contact the Indonesia Tourist Promotion Board, 3457 Wilshire Blvd.
NEWS
March 15, 2009 | Zakki Hakim, Hakim writes for the Associated Press.
Indonesia's tiger catchers have a double job -- protecting humans from tigers, and tigers from humans. The elite teams of rangers and conservationists rush to the scene every time villagers report attacks or sightings of critically endangered Sumatran tigers. First, they calm the people. Then, if there are signs that the animal is nearby, they return with steel cage traps, live bait, heat-sensitive cameras and other equipment to capture the magnificent beasts. This time, Sartono, who at 40 has spent nearly half of his life in the job, arrives with his six-member squad at a remote oil palm plantation in Sungai Gelam district, 375 miles west of the capital, Jakarta, knowing they will have to act fast.
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