Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSumatran Rhino Trust
IN THE NEWS

Sumatran Rhino Trust

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1991
Reversing action taken by the Greater Los Angeles Zoo Assn., city parks officials have voted to let the Los Angeles Zoo rejoin the Sumatran Rhino Trust--a coalition of American zoos that is attempting to save the rare Asian rhinoceros from extinction. The association abruptly withdrew the zoo from the 9-year-old campaign late last year after deciding the program was unsuccessful and too costly.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1991
Reversing action taken by the Greater Los Angeles Zoo Assn., city parks officials have voted to let the Los Angeles Zoo rejoin the Sumatran Rhino Trust--a coalition of American zoos that is attempting to save the rare Asian rhinoceros from extinction. The association abruptly withdrew the zoo from the 9-year-old campaign late last year after deciding the program was unsuccessful and too costly.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1991
A rare Sumatran rhinoceros--one of perhaps 100 left on Earth--arrived in Los Angeles on Saturday to join in an unusual breeding project that conservationists hope will prevent the extinction of the species. The 700-pound female was taken to the Los Angeles Zoo to end an eight-day truck, ferry and jetliner trip that started in Sumatra and included a stopover in Jakarta, Indonesia, officials said. Zoo experts will examine the animal today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It should have been the highlight of a rhino man's career. A rare Sumatran rhinoceros--one of only about 100 left on Earth--was coming to Los Angeles as the result of a nine-year, $400,000 effort by Los Angeles Zoo officials to help save the animal from extinction. But zoo rhinoceros curator Michael Dee was not there when the 2,200-pound male rhino arrived at Los Angeles International Airport the other day.
MAGAZINE
October 5, 2003 | Katherine Gould, Katherine Gould, a freelance writer living in Glendale, worked at the Los Angeles Zoo for three years. Her first book, a collection of animal mating rituals offered as lessons for humans and called "A Tiger in the Bedroom," will be released this month by Andrews McMeel Publishing.
Except for the hair, Andalas looks like a fairly average, smallish young rhinoceros, happily trotting around a grassy yard at the Los Angeles Zoo. But there's all that hair. The shaggy patch on his back looks like a too-small toupee. On his belly and legs, the hair is sparse and spiky--all of it a deep, sultry auburn color.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|