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NEWS
November 18, 2012 | By Charles Perry
Most societies that make bread also make some kind of beer. In a way, beer is just a batch of bread gone wrong. If batter contains the enzymes to convert starch to fermentable sugars, either from sprouted grain (malt) or saliva (if the grain has been chewed), it will turn into beer, though not exactly a well-hopped lager with a creamy head of foam. As beers still are in some remote places, it will be a bit sour, only slightly alcoholic and so porridge-like it provides B vitamins as well as carbohydrates.
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NEWS
November 18, 2012 | By Charles Perry
Most societies that make bread also make some kind of beer. In a way, beer is just a batch of bread gone wrong. If batter contains the enzymes to convert starch to fermentable sugars, either from sprouted grain (malt) or saliva (if the grain has been chewed), it will turn into beer, though not exactly a well-hopped lager with a creamy head of foam. As beers still are in some remote places, it will be a bit sour, only slightly alcoholic and so porridge-like it provides B vitamins as well as carbohydrates.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Let's face it. Accountants are not universally loved in our society, especially now that income tax time is nearing and a depressed economy is forcing the "bean counters" to make drastic cuts in budgets of all kinds. It may, then, come as a big surprise that accountants are responsible for two of the most basic concepts that provide the underpinning of modern society: the development of writing and the ability to use numbers in complex mathematical manipulations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Let's face it. Accountants are not universally loved in our society, especially now that income tax time is nearing and a depressed economy is forcing the "bean counters" to make drastic cuts in budgets of all kinds. It may, then, come as a big surprise that accountants are responsible for two of the most basic concepts that provide the underpinning of modern society: the development of writing and the ability to use numbers in complex mathematical manipulations.
NEWS
November 30, 1990
Samuel Noah Kramer, 93, a leading authority on the 4,000-year-old Sumerian language. Kramer began excavating Sumerian tablets in Iraq in 1930. He also transcribed tablets from a collection in Istanbul and worked on an Assyrian dictionary being prepared at the University of Chicago. He was a professor emeritus in Assyriology at the University of Pennsylvania, where he joined the faculty in 1942.
NEWS
February 11, 1991
Beer may be associated with America's favorite pastimes, but it has its roots in the Mideast. Many anthropologists and historians believe that that the EARLIEST KNOWN BREWS came from the civilizations of Mesopotamia. On the plains between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, in what is now southern Iraq, the Sumerians gave the world its first written account of beer making. By the way, they also are credited with developing the first written language, irrigation and the potter's wheel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2000
Archeologists have uncovered the ruins of a 6,000-year-old city in Syria, a find that suggests that urban civilization rose earlier than had been believed. Scientists from the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute found a protective city wall and the ruins under a huge mound in northeastern Syria known as Tell Hamoukar. Previously, the only cities uncovered by archeologists dating back to 4000 BC were to the south in Sumeria, in southern Mesopotamia.
WORLD
June 13, 2003 | From Associated Press
The sacred Vase of Warka, one of the most valuable artifacts of the Iraq National Museum collection, was returned unceremoniously Thursday in the trunk of a car. The 5,000-year-old white limestone vase, the world's oldest carved-stone ritual vessel, was handed over with other looted items, U.S.-led coalition forces said in a statement. Three men gave the pieces to security staff at the central Baghdad museum, a gesture that could reassure archeologists worried about Iraq's ancient treasures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1990 | BRUCE RULE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The recipe was part of a Sumerian hymn to the goddess Ninkasi, written in cuneiform on a clay tablet that dates back to 1800 BC. It calls for ingredients you might not think of, but it makes a smooth, mild beer--with a little fruity taste. "It's very good," Professor Solomon Katz of the University of Pennsylvania said as he opened a bottle. "They used dates to make it taste that way."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1998
The ingenious Sumerians properly get credit for most of the inventions at the root of Western civilization, from the wheel to law and international trade. An archeological dig begun at a Ukrainian farm earlier this summer, however, is providing compelling evidence that the Sumerians garnered more than a few tips about civilization from a remarkable, little-known Neolithic tribe called the Trypillians.
NEWS
November 30, 1990
Samuel Noah Kramer, 93, a leading authority on the 4,000-year-old Sumerian language. Kramer began excavating Sumerian tablets in Iraq in 1930. He also transcribed tablets from a collection in Istanbul and worked on an Assyrian dictionary being prepared at the University of Chicago. He was a professor emeritus in Assyriology at the University of Pennsylvania, where he joined the faculty in 1942.
FOOD
November 11, 1998 | CHARLES PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten years ago, Fritz Maytag saw a newspaper article about ancient Sumerian beer. On Sunday, he recounted his experience of trying a 5,000-year-old beer recipe before a sold-out audience at the Bowers Museum in Santa Ana. Maytag makes no claim to be a scholar of ancient Mesopotamian languages--he is, as most beer lovers know, the proprietor of the Anchor Steam Beer Co. of San Francisco. But because of his practical experience as a beer-maker, he was able to clear up some obscure points.
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