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NEWS
January 14, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep in the mountains of Kyushu, a small group of elderly villagers huddled around a kerosene stove last month to talk about their long battle with arsenic, bureaucracy and the courts--in their view, three equally virulent strains of poison. Their experiences tell a sorry tale about the state of justice in Japan today. Forty-one villagers filed suit against Sumitomo Metal Mining Co.
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NEWS
January 14, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep in the mountains of Kyushu, a small group of elderly villagers huddled around a kerosene stove last month to talk about their long battle with arsenic, bureaucracy and the courts--in their view, three equally virulent strains of poison. Their experiences tell a sorry tale about the state of justice in Japan today. Forty-one villagers filed suit against Sumitomo Metal Mining Co.
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WORLD
April 20, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The operator of a plant involved in Japan's worst nuclear accident has abandoned efforts to restart its fuel-reprocessing business, ending a three-year bid to win back its license. Directors of JCO Co. approved the decision, and Sumitomo Metal Mining Co., which owns JCO, said it backed the move. On Sept. 30, 1999, two workers at the plant in Tokai mixed uranium in buckets instead of mechanized tanks, setting off an uncontrolled nuclear reaction that exposed them to fatal doses of radiation.
NEWS
October 12, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Six former executives of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant were arrested Wednesday for an accident last year that killed two people and exposed hundreds to radiation. The suspects face charges of negligence resulting in death in the Sept. 30, 1999, accident at the plant about 80 miles northeast of Tokyo, said Isao Yamazaki of the Ibaraki prefectural police. The six men, all former employees of plant operator JCO Co.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1985 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Phelps Dodge Corp., the nation's second-largest copper producer, said Monday that it intends to sell as much as a 40% stake in its prime Arizona mining operations--site of a bitter, 18-month strike--to Sumitomo Corp. and Sumitomo Metal Mining Co. of Japan. A spokesman for Phelps Dodge in New York said the company expects to use proceeds of the sale to reduce its long-term debt, which totaled about $570 million last year.
NEWS
October 9, 1999 | From Associated Press
A former president of the company blamed for Japan's worst nuclear accident resigned Friday from a government-affiliated organization to express remorse for the radiation leak. Toshiki Takagi served as president of JCO Co., which ran the uranium processing plant where the accident occurred, from June 1995 until June this year, Kyodo News Service reported. Takagi quit his job as president of the Metal Mining Agency of Japan, Kyodo said.
NEWS
October 7, 1999 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nuclear plant worker Hisashi Ouchi, 35, had a stable career, a family and a home near the sea. But after more than 10 years on the job, he apparently didn't have an inkling about the potentially lethal hazards of his work mixing highly enriched uranium fuel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1999 | NAJMEDIN MESHKATI
Human ingenuity can now create large-scale technological systems whose accidents rival in their effects the greatest of natural disasters, sometimes with even higher death tolls and greater environmental damage. Exhibit A: Thursday's serious accident at a nuclear processing plant in Tokaimura, Japan, that sickened dozens of workers and area residents and caused some local evacuations.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2011 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Tokyo Electric Power Co., which owns the earthquake- and tsunami-ravaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, is being criticized by people around the world, including the Japanese prime minister, for lacking candor ? and not for the first time. Critics have complained for years that Japanese nuclear plant operators ? particularly Tepco, as it is known ? have withheld information about safety violations and accidents. The critics have accused regulators of lax oversight in a giant industrial nation with no oil or gas resources, where atomic energy provides about one third of the power.
NEWS
October 2, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of thousands of anxious Japanese were told they could leave their homes and resume normal activities Friday, after the government declared that the immediate danger had passed from the nation's worst nuclear accident. Radiation levels returned to normal outside the uranium processing plant in Tokaimura, about 80 miles northeast of Tokyo, where a nuclear fission chain reaction spun out of control Thursday, officials said.
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