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OPINION
October 11, 2009 | Jim Heimann, Jim Heimann, executive editor of Taschen American, is the editor of the just-published "Los Angeles: Portrait of a City."
L.A. isn't outside anyone's front door. It's a tough city to get ahold of. You have to work to experience, view and enjoy it. You have to roam its endless network of freeways and streets and immerse yourself in its guts to be rewarded. I had two years and 20,000 images to start. A city that emerged in tandem with the advent of photography provides immeasurable documentary possibilities. I attempted to avoid the biases of a hometown boy and focused on telling a visual tale of the "City of the Future" and the "Wonder City of the West."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2010
"The Beautiful & the Damned: Punk Photographs by Ann Summa" Where: Track 16 Gallery, Bergamot Station C1, 2525 Michigan Ave., Santa Monica When: Thursdays to Saturdays noon to 6 p.m.; opening reception 6 to 9 p.m., Saturday, with a book signing by Ann Summa at 7 p.m. and a performance by Exene Cervenka at 8:15 p.m. Contact: (310) 264-4678; http://www.track16.com ; www.beautifulandthedamned.com
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NEWS
July 17, 1988 | JAY GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
The Playa del Rey Stables has lost its 3-year battle to avoid eviction. A spokesman for the Summa Corp., which owns the property, said last week that Summa will take over the facility Aug. 1. But the end of one controversy is likely to lead to another. Nearby residents, with the support of City Councilwoman Ruth Galanter, are opposing Summa's plan to build up to six stories of housing for the elderly on the 8-acre stables site.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2010 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
On Nov. 20, 1980, Ari Up, the 18-year-old lead singer of the influential punk band the Slits curled up on the scuzzy AstroTurf that bordered the pool of the now-gone Tropicana Motel on Santa Monica Boulevard, her skirt clumped above her knees and a large dog with its paw over her wrist. Photographer Ann Summa, then in her late 20s, snapped a photo of the moment with her clunky Nikon camera. Suddenly Up opened her eyes, looked at Summa — a dedicated punk rock fan who had been faithfully documenting the scene — and told her where to go, in terms both certain and unpublishable.
NEWS
November 10, 1985 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles City Council will decide on Nov. 19 whether to annex more than 800 acres of undeveloped land near Marina del Rey, which the owner, Summa Corp., plans to develop into Playa Vista, a community with 18,000 residents, 3 million square feet of office space and 2,400 hotel rooms. The city's annexation of Summa's property--located between Marina del Rey and Los Angeles International Airport--would remove it from the control of Los Angeles County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1987
I find it truly exhilarating to read about Los Angeles Councilwoman Ruth Galanter's battle to reduce the size of Summa Corp.'s gigantic Playa Vista project (Metro, Oct. 13), as well as the amount of damage it will cause to the Ballona Wetlands. Having lived in the Los Angeles area for all of my 32 years and watched massive, inappropriate developments built one after another without concern about environmental damage, population planning, traffic impacts, etc., I am delighted that a member of the City Council has both the courage and the clout to take on this project and cut it down to size.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1985
The article regarding the closing of Playa del Rey Stables completely missed the point (Times, April 25). The horses, although a minor disturbance to the wetlands, are not the cause of the deterioration of that habitat. Encroaching "civilization," with its penchant for development of every piece of open land in the entire city, is what is shrinking and endangering the natural environment. It is Summa Corp.'s wish to build a housing center on the land that is the cause for the stables' eviction; the horses have been ridden on the existing trails throughout Playa del Rey since 1911 and the wetlands habitats have been respected by the riders ever since there has been an awareness of the sensitivity of that environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1988 | BILL BOYARSKY and JAY GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writers
California entered the battle over Los Angeles development on Tuesday when state Controller Gray Davis announced that the state has taken over 70 acres of vacant Westside land near Marina del Rey that is worth at least $84 million in a tax settlement with the heirs of Howard Hughes.
NEWS
September 22, 1985 | DAVID FERRELL, Times Staff Writer
Citing concerns over traffic and building heights, homeowners groups have asked for major changes in plans for Playa Vista, a Summa Corp. development that would bring 18,000 new residents, 3 million square feet of office space and 2,400 hotel rooms to about 900 acres of vacant land near Marina del Rey.
NEWS
April 25, 1985 | JAMES RAINEY, Times Staff Writer
The seven-acre Playa del Rey Stables has been ordered to leave its Culver Boulevard site, and the owners of some of the 90 horses boarded there say they may have to destroy their animals if new homes cannot be found. Summa Corp., which owns the land, last month sent an eviction notice that ordered the stables at 315 Culver Blvd. vacated by Sept. 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2009 | By Tony Barboza
None of them will become valedictorian, but some of the brightest 17- and 18-year-olds in Huntington Beach will be graduating summa cum laude before they ever set foot on a college campus. For years, high schools have been retreating from singling out students as valedictorians and salutatorians to ease the competition and pressure that the quest for the top class rankings can place on teenagers. Some high schools have found a solution in recognizing dozens of valedictorians.
OPINION
October 11, 2009 | Jim Heimann, Jim Heimann, executive editor of Taschen American, is the editor of the just-published "Los Angeles: Portrait of a City."
L.A. isn't outside anyone's front door. It's a tough city to get ahold of. You have to work to experience, view and enjoy it. You have to roam its endless network of freeways and streets and immerse yourself in its guts to be rewarded. I had two years and 20,000 images to start. A city that emerged in tandem with the advent of photography provides immeasurable documentary possibilities. I attempted to avoid the biases of a hometown boy and focused on telling a visual tale of the "City of the Future" and the "Wonder City of the West."
BUSINESS
March 22, 2001 | SARAH HALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Summa Industries said Wednesday that it will cut about 13% of its work force, nearly 130 jobs, in hopes of reducing costs after a significant drop in fiscal second-quarter earnings as sales slowed for its molded plastic parts. Torrance-based Summa, which employs about 1,000 people, said the general economic downturn coupled with slowing demand for its products caused a 60% drop in profit for its fiscal second quarter ended Feb. 28.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1997
Shareholders at Calnetics Corp. have overwhelmingly approved the sale of the company for $7.35 a share to Summa Industries based in Torrance. Calnetics, which was headquartered in Chatsworth, is a maker of various plastic fittings and components used in the building materials and agricultural industries. Calnetics said that 99% of the shares voted were in favor of the deal.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1997
Calnetics Corp. of Chatsworth, a plastic components company, and Summa Industries of Torrance have reached an agreement to merge Calnetics into a Summa subsidiary for cash. Under the terms of the agreement, each outstanding share of Calnetics common stock would be converted into the right to receive $7.35 in cash.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1996
Summa Industries, a manufacturer of industrial equipment and engineered products, reported lower profit in the fiscal third quarter while sales rose 11%. Net income for the quarter ended May 31 totaled $193,000, or 12 cents a share, which included a loss of $14,000 from Summa's Morehouse-Cowles Inc. subsidiary, which was sold May 31. Summa had net income of $202,000, or 13 cents a share, for the like period last year. Sales rose to $3.1 million from $2.8 million.
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