Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSummary Judgment
IN THE NEWS

Summary Judgment

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
April 28, 1994 | From Associated Press
Former Lincoln Savings & Loan Assn. boss Charles H. Keating Jr. has been ordered to pay an additional $4.3 billion by a judge who refused to hold what Keating says would have been his first full trial. Keating, previously ordered to pay $2.5 billion in the collapse of Irvine-based Lincoln, disclosed last week's judgment on Wednesday. The latest judgment was entered against the 71-year-old, imprisoned Keating by Richard Bilby, a Tucson, Ariz.-based federal judge.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Director James Cameron and his Lightstorm Entertainment Inc. have prevailed in a legal case brought against them by a man who alleged that his ideas were stolen for use in the blockbuster "Avatar. " In December 2011, Eric Ryder filed a lawsuit in Los Angeles Superior Court alleging that Cameron's "Avatar" stole plot elements, settings and other details from a story called "K.R.Z. 2068" that Ryder gave to Lightstorm executives. "Avatar," released in December 2009, is the top-grossing movie of all time, and took in $2.78 billion in global box office receipts, according to Box Office Mojo.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1994 | JEFF McDONALD
A group of Ojai residents intent on moving a 98-foot radar tower from atop Sulphur Mountain said Monday that they have filed papers urging a federal judge not to issue a summary judgment in their case against the National Weather Service. Actor Larry Hagman, resident David Hedman and the Environmental Coalition of Ojai sued the government in early January, claiming that it had not done adequate health studies before erecting the weather-tracking station on Sulphur Mountain.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
Superman won't be going up, up, and away from Warner Bros. In a crucial legal victory for the Burbank studio, a federal judge in Los Angeles on Wednesday denied an effort by the heirs of Superman co-creator Joseph Shuster to reclaim their 50% interest in the world's most famous superhero. Superman is one of Warner's most valuable characters, having generated more than $500 million at the domestic box office with five films and billions of dollars more from television series such as “Smallville,” toys and games, and 74 years' worth of comic books.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1986
I am the attorney for Charles W. Knapp, former chairman and chief executive of Financial Corp. of America and American Savings & Loan Assn. A number of articles in recent months have referred to litigation against him. The most recent Times article on May 17 referred to the "buy-sell" lawsuit brought against American Savings & Loan by Dudley G. Kirkpatrick, a real estate developer, which is currently being tried in Sacramento Superior Court....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
J. G. Boswell Co., California's biggest farming enterprise, lost an appeal in the 5th District State Court of Appeal of an $11.1-million judgment for malicious prosecution of three Kern County farmers. Boswell filed a libel suit over ads that growers Ken Wegis, Jack Thomson and his son, Jeff, ran in local newspapers during a bitter campaign over the Peripheral Canal. The ads criticized the company for opposing the canal and providing financing to help defeat it in 1982.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A lawsuit filed by Tim Burton's ex-girlfriend over his assets should be dismissed, an appeals court has ruled. The California Court of Appeals issued a ruling this week ordering a lower court judge to grant a motion by Burton's attorneys for a summary judgment. The move halts a trial scheduled for next week that would have focused on the couple's nearly decade-long relationship, which ended in 2001. Burton's longtime girlfriend, Lisa Marie, sued the director in 2006. She claimed that she was cheated out of money that Burton had promised her during their relationship.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
Warner Bros. has filed a series of explosive allegations against its longtime legal nemesis as a key decision looms that could affect its ownership of Superman. The Burbank studio's DC Comics unit said in a legal filing Wednesday in Los Angeles federal court that attorney Marc Toberoff, who has represented the heirs of Superman creators Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster in their eight-year fight to regain control of the Man of Steel character, has engaged in "willful concealment of evidence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1989 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, Times Staff Writer
For four years, Ruth Cisneros hunted for a better apartment for herself and her young daughter, away from what she considered a dangerous, gang-plagued area near Burbank Airport. But her applications were always turned down. Her efforts were being thwarted, unbeknown to her, by a report on file with a Van Nuys landlord information service that said a previous landlord had tried three times to evict her. Cisneros knew the eviction attempts were part of an effort to get rid of tenants whose rent payments were publicly subsidized.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
Warner Bros. has filed a series of explosive allegations against its longtime legal nemesis as a key decision looms that could affect its ownership of Superman. The Burbank studio's DC Comics unit said in a legal filing Wednesday in Los Angeles federal court that attorney Marc Toberoff, who has represented the heirs of Superman creators Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster in their eight-year fight to regain control of the Man of Steel character, has engaged in "willful concealment of evidence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2012 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
Two women who sued the city of Compton, alleging that the city's election system violates the rights of Latino voters, have not presented enough evidence to decide the case without a trial, a judge has ruled. The plaintiffs, both Latinas, asked the court for a summary judgment, arguing that the facts show without dispute that the city's at-large voting system impairs the ability of Latino voters to elect the candidates of their choice. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Elizabeth Allen White ruled Friday that the women had not presented strong enough evidence to decide the case on the spot, meaning it will go to trial as scheduled in February.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A lawsuit filed by Tim Burton's ex-girlfriend over his assets should be dismissed, an appeals court has ruled. The California Court of Appeals issued a ruling this week ordering a lower court judge to grant a motion by Burton's attorneys for a summary judgment. The move halts a trial scheduled for next week that would have focused on the couple's nearly decade-long relationship, which ended in 2001. Burton's longtime girlfriend, Lisa Marie, sued the director in 2006. She claimed that she was cheated out of money that Burton had promised her during their relationship.
WORLD
March 14, 2006 | Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writer
The former chief of Saddam Hussein's secret Revolutionary Court said Monday that he had personally convicted and sentenced 148 Shiite Muslims to death after a two-week hearing but later conceded that some might have been executed before the trial began. At times looking up in defiance at the bench, at other times gazing sheepishly at the floor, Awad Hamed Bandar sparred with the chief judge and prosecutor of the U.S.-backed court that is trying him, Hussein and six others.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2001 | JOSEPH MENN and JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal judge gave the beleaguered Napster Inc. online song-swapping service an unexpected ray of hope Wednesday when she questioned whether the record industry's plans for authorized digital music licensing could amount to misuse of their own copyrights. U.S. District Judge Marilyn Patel's comments came during a hearing on the record labels' request for summary judgment in their 2-year-old suit, which accuses Napster of helping millions of its users violate their copyrights.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Amgen Inc., the world's largest biotechnology company, has asked a U.S. judge to forgo a trial and rule that Transkaryotic Therapies Inc. violated Amgen's patents on its best-selling Epogen drug. Thousand Oaks-based Amgen filed for summary judgment, asking that the judge declare Transkaryotic's efforts to market its own version of erythropoietin illegal. Erythropoietin, an anti-anemia drug for cancer patients, is sold by Amgen as Epogen and by Johnson & Johnson as Procrit.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
Superman won't be going up, up, and away from Warner Bros. In a crucial legal victory for the Burbank studio, a federal judge in Los Angeles on Wednesday denied an effort by the heirs of Superman co-creator Joseph Shuster to reclaim their 50% interest in the world's most famous superhero. Superman is one of Warner's most valuable characters, having generated more than $500 million at the domestic box office with five films and billions of dollars more from television series such as “Smallville,” toys and games, and 74 years' worth of comic books.
OPINION
January 29, 1995
Re "U.S. Probes Allegations of Racism by Torrance Police," Jan. 16: We believe this justifiably requires a response. This article would lead readers to believe that the Torrance Police Department is out of control. It is not representative of the community service provided by the department. Responsible journalism dictates that we provide facts which substantiate that the Torrance Police Department is clearly "making a difference." A high level of service to the community is provided along with a degree of professionalism which is clearly not evidenced in this article.
OPINION
January 29, 1995
Re "U.S. Probes Allegations of Racism by Torrance Police," Jan. 16: We believe this justifiably requires a response. This article would lead readers to believe that the Torrance Police Department is out of control. It is not representative of the community service provided by the department. Responsible journalism dictates that we provide facts which substantiate that the Torrance Police Department is clearly "making a difference." A high level of service to the community is provided along with a degree of professionalism which is clearly not evidenced in this article.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1994 | From Associated Press
Former Lincoln Savings & Loan Assn. boss Charles H. Keating Jr. has been ordered to pay an additional $4.3 billion by a judge who refused to hold what Keating says would have been his first full trial. Keating, previously ordered to pay $2.5 billion in the collapse of Irvine-based Lincoln, disclosed last week's judgment on Wednesday. The latest judgment was entered against the 71-year-old, imprisoned Keating by Richard Bilby, a Tucson, Ariz.-based federal judge.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|