Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSummer Breeze
IN THE NEWS

Summer Breeze

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
July 20, 1997
Yesterday, I was passed by two "gentlemen" riding on Harley-Davidson motorcycles. As I had my window down enjoying the summer breeze, I was subjected to a mind-numbing volume. Not only did this scare the daylights out of me, but it left my ears ringing for an hour afterward. What I don't understand is why it is illegal for me to drive around in my car with no muffler, when it seems perfectly all right for Harleys to be straight-piped? I have been awoken numerous times by these "pipes saving lives" and am quite frankly sick of the lack of consideration.
ARTICLES BY DATE
IMAGE
June 15, 2008 | Emili Vesilind, Times Staff Writer
KATY PERRY is squatting over a big duffel bag, rifling through printed dresses, retro rompers, hats, turquoise suede heels and other anti-wallflower accessories, deciding what to wear for the second take of her photo shoot. She holds up a red straw hat with a brim the size of a truck tire, then fishes out a beaded red purse shaped like an apple. "See," Perry says, her huge blue eyes widening. "I love anything fruit."
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1986 | Al Martinez
It happened one Christmas Eve a long time ago in a place called Oakland on a newspaper called the Tribune with a city editor named Alfred P. Reck. I was working swing shift on general assignment, writing the story of a boy who was dying of leukemia and whose greatest wish was for fresh peaches. It was a story which, in the tradition of 1950s journalism, would be milked for every sob we could squeeze from it, because everyone loved a good cry on Christmas.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2005 | Mona Gable, Special to The Times
Summer. The very word strikes dread into the hearts of working parents. All those camps and enrichment activities to sift through and cobble together just to find a way to occupy your footloose kids. And don't even mention the cash you'll be shelling out so your culturally deprived children can have the summer of their lives instead of you going off to Hawaii. Well, don't cancel the reservations just yet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1991 | AL MARTINEZ
She remembers the good times, when her daughter was 5 and the twins 3, and the trip they took to Mexico. She remembers camping vacations, chasing the kids on the beach, and hearing their laughter like wind chimes on a summer breeze. And she remembers the night of the fire, coming home to see red lights flashing in the darkness, the smell of burnt wood in the air, the terrible realization that something was wrong . . .
NEWS
December 25, 1986 | AL MARTINEZ
It happened one Christmas Eve a long time ago in a place called Oakland on a newspaper called the Tribune with a city editor named Alfred P. Reck. I was working swing shift on general assignment, writing the story of a boy who was dying of leukemia and whose greatest wish was for fresh peaches. It was a story which, in the tradition of 1950s journalism, would be milked for every sob we could squeeze from it, because everyone loved a good cry on Christmas.
MAGAZINE
May 17, 1998
Sytled by Pauline Leonard / Cloutiers; hair: Will Carrillo / Cloutier; makeup: Victor Joseph / Cloutier; models: Shakara / Elite L.A. and Veronica Renault / L.A. Models
SPORTS
August 25, 2002 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sparks are back, and they're waiting for company. The defending champions returned to the WNBA Finals on Saturday by sprinting past Utah, 103-77, at Staples Center to clinch the Western Conference title with a two-game sweep. Amid the giddiness of an afternoon when the Sparks set a WNBA playoff record with 103 points and led by as many as 30, the question on some people's minds was this: Will it even matter whether it's Washington or New York that wins the Eastern Conference title today?
SPORTS
July 26, 2000 | DAVE DESMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Courts will soon be adjourned for the summer, ending an unprecedented season of change for girls' basketball teams in the region. The Bell-Jeff Summer Hoop Finale, which continues through Saturday, marks the final week of the summer season before the Southern Section's three-week dead period. Of the 15 teams participating at Bell-Jeff, six are breaking in new coaches.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2005 | Mona Gable, Special to The Times
Summer. The very word strikes dread into the hearts of working parents. All those camps and enrichment activities to sift through and cobble together just to find a way to occupy your footloose kids. And don't even mention the cash you'll be shelling out so your culturally deprived children can have the summer of their lives instead of you going off to Hawaii. Well, don't cancel the reservations just yet.
SPORTS
August 25, 2002 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sparks are back, and they're waiting for company. The defending champions returned to the WNBA Finals on Saturday by sprinting past Utah, 103-77, at Staples Center to clinch the Western Conference title with a two-game sweep. Amid the giddiness of an afternoon when the Sparks set a WNBA playoff record with 103 points and led by as many as 30, the question on some people's minds was this: Will it even matter whether it's Washington or New York that wins the Eastern Conference title today?
SPORTS
July 26, 2000 | DAVE DESMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Courts will soon be adjourned for the summer, ending an unprecedented season of change for girls' basketball teams in the region. The Bell-Jeff Summer Hoop Finale, which continues through Saturday, marks the final week of the summer season before the Southern Section's three-week dead period. Of the 15 teams participating at Bell-Jeff, six are breaking in new coaches.
MAGAZINE
May 17, 1998
Sytled by Pauline Leonard / Cloutiers; hair: Will Carrillo / Cloutier; makeup: Victor Joseph / Cloutier; models: Shakara / Elite L.A. and Veronica Renault / L.A. Models
OPINION
July 20, 1997
Yesterday, I was passed by two "gentlemen" riding on Harley-Davidson motorcycles. As I had my window down enjoying the summer breeze, I was subjected to a mind-numbing volume. Not only did this scare the daylights out of me, but it left my ears ringing for an hour afterward. What I don't understand is why it is illegal for me to drive around in my car with no muffler, when it seems perfectly all right for Harleys to be straight-piped? I have been awoken numerous times by these "pipes saving lives" and am quite frankly sick of the lack of consideration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1991 | AL MARTINEZ
She remembers the good times, when her daughter was 5 and the twins 3, and the trip they took to Mexico. She remembers camping vacations, chasing the kids on the beach, and hearing their laughter like wind chimes on a summer breeze. And she remembers the night of the fire, coming home to see red lights flashing in the darkness, the smell of burnt wood in the air, the terrible realization that something was wrong . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1986 | Al Martinez
It happened one Christmas Eve a long time ago in a place called Oakland on a newspaper called the Tribune with a city editor named Alfred P. Reck. I was working swing shift on general assignment, writing the story of a boy who was dying of leukemia and whose greatest wish was for fresh peaches. It was a story which, in the tradition of 1950s journalism, would be milked for every sob we could squeeze from it, because everyone loved a good cry on Christmas.
IMAGE
June 15, 2008 | Emili Vesilind, Times Staff Writer
KATY PERRY is squatting over a big duffel bag, rifling through printed dresses, retro rompers, hats, turquoise suede heels and other anti-wallflower accessories, deciding what to wear for the second take of her photo shoot. She holds up a red straw hat with a brim the size of a truck tire, then fishes out a beaded red purse shaped like an apple. "See," Perry says, her huge blue eyes widening. "I love anything fruit."
NEWS
December 25, 1986 | AL MARTINEZ
It happened one Christmas Eve a long time ago in a place called Oakland on a newspaper called the Tribune with a city editor named Alfred P. Reck. I was working swing shift on general assignment, writing the story of a boy who was dying of leukemia and whose greatest wish was for fresh peaches. It was a story which, in the tradition of 1950s journalism, would be milked for every sob we could squeeze from it, because everyone loved a good cry on Christmas.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|