Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSummer Harvest Crusade
IN THE NEWS

Summer Harvest Crusade

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1992 | TERRY SPENCER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Anaheim Stadium is rented, posters are up, thousands of bumper stickers have been distributed, radio ads are running, bands are set to play and banners will be unfurled. But when the Summer Harvest Crusade opens Friday, organizers will be seeking converts not to a political candidate but to Christianity.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 10, 1994 | ROY RIVENBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has a Harley in his garage, LSD in his past and a "liveskunk" he occasionally holds in his lap aboard airplanes. He talks up Jesus at stadiums and on surfboards. And he gets letters threatening his life. Greg Laurie, the man behind all those Harvest Crusade bumper stickers, has carved out an unusual niche among evangelists.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1992 | DAYE CLARK
The Summer Harvest Crusade at Anaheim Stadium will begin Friday evening next week. Pastor Greg Laurie is featured; Chuck Smith of Calvary Chapel in Costa Mesa and other area pastors are special guests, with the Maranatha Praise Band, Dennis Agajanian, Lenny Le Blanc, Richie Furay, Crystal Lewis and Benny Hester. Several hundred local churches are involved in the crusade. Testimonies will be given each evening with Spanish and Korean translations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1992 | TERRY SPENCER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Anaheim Stadium is rented, posters are up, thousands of bumper stickers have been distributed, radio ads are running, bands are set to play and banners will be unfurled. But when the Summer Harvest Crusade opens Friday, organizers will be seeking converts not to a political candidate but to Christianity.
NEWS
July 10, 1994 | ROY RIVENBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has a Harley in his garage, LSD in his past and a "liveskunk" he occasionally holds in his lap aboard airplanes. He talks up Jesus at stadiums and on surfboards. And he gets letters threatening his life. Greg Laurie, the man behind all those Harvest Crusade bumper stickers, has carved out an unusual niche among evangelists.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1991
The Times reported on a controversy at the County Board of Supervisors concerning Supervisor Michael Antonovich's suggestion that the board name a new county nursing scholarship fund after himself (Metro, July 31). Antonovich reportedly responded to Supervisor Edelman's concerns that this was self-serving and inappropriate by pointing to the Edmund D. Edelman Health Center, thereby indicating that Edelman named this "county health center" after himself. Supervisor Antonovich is incorrect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1990 | ALLISON SAMUELS
In what might be the largest-ever religious ritual of its type in the county, about 3,000 people are expected to be baptized tonight at Corona del Mar State Beach as the Summer Harvest Crusade continues into its fifth day. "To our knowledge, not since the days of the New Testament have there been so many people baptized," said Ed Steele, a spokesman for the crusade.
NEWS
August 18, 1990 | LUCY CHABOT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of people seeking spiritual purification walked into the sea Friday evening in what church officials said was the largest baptism in memory. The converts entered the surging surf, some singly, others holding hands with spouses and children, and were greeted by pastors who asked them if they were ready to accept Jesus Christ in their lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1991 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of Southlanders are expected to jam the Pacific Amphitheatre tonight, kicking off a week of religious revivals that will mix evangelism and rock music in an effort to win converts to Christianity. After five days in Costa Mesa, the Summer Harvest Crusade, which sponsors say is costing about $225,000, will move to Anaheim Stadium on Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1991 | GREG HERNANDEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pastor Chuck Smith looked out at the more than 51,000 people who filled three-fourths of Anaheim Stadium on Friday night and said: "We've got a lineup tonight that would make Gene Autry drool." But instead of professional baseball stars such as Mark Langston and Jim Abbott, Smith, the pastor of Calvary Chapel of Costa Mesa, trotted out his own team of heavy hitters for the last night of the Summer Harvest Crusade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1992 | DAYE CLARK
The Summer Harvest Crusade at Anaheim Stadium will begin Friday evening next week. Pastor Greg Laurie is featured; Chuck Smith of Calvary Chapel in Costa Mesa and other area pastors are special guests, with the Maranatha Praise Band, Dennis Agajanian, Lenny Le Blanc, Richie Furay, Crystal Lewis and Benny Hester. Several hundred local churches are involved in the crusade. Testimonies will be given each evening with Spanish and Korean translations.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1991
The Times reported on a controversy at the County Board of Supervisors concerning Supervisor Michael Antonovich's suggestion that the board name a new county nursing scholarship fund after himself (Metro, July 31). Antonovich reportedly responded to Supervisor Edelman's concerns that this was self-serving and inappropriate by pointing to the Edmund D. Edelman Health Center, thereby indicating that Edelman named this "county health center" after himself. Supervisor Antonovich is incorrect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1990 | LUCY CHABOT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of people seeking spiritual purification walked into the sea Friday evening in what local church officials said was the largest baptism in memory. The converts entered the surging surf, some singly, others holding hands with spouses and children, and were greeted by pastors who asked them if they were ready to accept Jesus Christ in their lives. As the converts nodded or whispered their affirmation, they were briefly submerged in the water. Most surfaced smiling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1991 | Dana Parsons
The evening skies had not yet darkened. They were more slate gray than black and a whippy breeze forced some in the crowd to wrap coats around themselves or snuggle together. Looking at the assembled multitudes on the hillside at the Pacific Amphitheatre, it wasn't hard to imagine how it may have looked a couple thousand years ago in the hills of Galilee. "Are you going to be saved tonight?" the teen-age girl said to her friend, sitting next to her on the amphitheater's terraced lawn.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|