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Summer Heat

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SCIENCE
August 6, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
Exceedingly high summer temperatures, longer summers and related catastrophes, such as wildfire and drought, are poised to be the norm, and they are driven by climate change, according to a new research paper published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. In an opinion article over the weekend in the Washington Post that previewed the findings , the paper's lead author, James E. Hansen wrote: “It is no longer enough to say that global warming will increase the likelihood of extreme weather and to repeat the caveat that no individual weather event can be directly linked to climate change.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2013 | By Hailey Branson-Potts
Southern California will finally get a respite from the searing summer heat over the next few days, but it will be short-lived, according to the National Weather Service. Temperatures are expected to be normal to slightly below normal in coastal areas and in the valleys through Wednesday, said Andrew Rorke, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Oxnard . A marine layer returned Sunday and is expected to push temperatures down, Rorke said. During a heat wave, interior coastal air pushes the cooler air farther onto the water and keeps it from reaching land.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2007 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
The 2007 summer movie season may have just come to an end, but Hollywood already is intensely focused on the holiday seasons looming far in the distance. The third "Narnia" film, "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader," has been set for May 7, 2010 -- although not a foot of film has been shot. DreamWorks and Paramount, meanwhile, announced that they have penciled in June 26, 2009, for their "Transformers 2" -- even though there's no finished script or production start date.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2013 | By Angel Jennings
Southern California residents looking from a break from the sweltering summer heat don't have to wait much longer as temperatures are expected to cool down over the next few days, according to the National Weather Service. A cooling trend is expected to take place Sunday through Wednesday, as the area of high pressure that brought on a heat wave last week has broken down and will offer the area a much-needed respite, said meteorologist David Sweet. Near the beaches, temperatures are expected to drop to the mid- to upper-70s.  Low clouds and fog may settle over some coastal communities and further cool the area, Sweet said.
SPORTS
August 4, 2005 | Mark Heisler
The NBA's rite of summer: If it's August, someone must be going somewhere. No superstars went anywhere, but NBA free agency being what it is these days, almost 10% of the league did. Ray Allen, the No. 1 plum, stayed in Seattle, and Michael Redd, the No. 2 prize, stayed in Milwaukee, but to date, some 30 players have changed teams.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2001 | ERIC MALNIC and KARIMA HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It was hot in Southern California on Tuesday, and in case you'd forgotten, that's what it usually is around here at this time of year. The high temperature at the Los Angeles Civic Center, recorded at 11:46 a.m., was 85 degrees, and that's the normal high for the date. The low temperature downtown, recorded at 6:06 a.m., was 65 degrees, and that's just one degree below normal. But after July, which was quite a bit cooler than normal, 85 seemed uncomfortably warm.
MAGAZINE
June 1, 1997
Produced and styled by Barbara Thornburg
NATIONAL
July 26, 2003 | From Associated Press
It's so hot here windshields are shattering or falling out, dogs are burning their paws on the pavement, and candles are melting indoors. People who live in the Valley of the Sun don't usually sweat the summer heat. But this July is off the charts. With the average high for the first three weeks of July at 110 degrees, Phoenix is on track to have the hottest July since the National Weather Service started keeping records in 1896. The average July high is 104.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1990 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And you thought summer was over! The calendar says it ended two weeks ago, but summer came back with a vengeance Thursday, spewing a double whammy of searing heat and wilting smog. A mild Santa Ana wind condition drove temperatures into the mid-90s around much of Orange County. Beach temperatures hovered in the mid- to high 70s. Although the air quality was deemed "unhealthful" in most places, no smog alerts were issued. Today, however, heat haters can rejoice and heat lovers can mourn.
NEWS
August 15, 1993 | IRA DREYFUSS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bad air is bad news for exercisers. When summer heat cooks smog into an ozone stew, athletes should think about cutting back and maybe staying inside, experts warn. Ozone is a form of oxygen that develops when hydrocarbons from car and industry emissions mix in summer heat and sunlight. It is chemically similar to the atmospheric ozone layer that filters skin-damaging ultraviolet radiation from sunlight. But there's a difference--that layer is 15 miles up, safely out of breathing range.
NEWS
June 23, 2013 | By Rene Lynch
Summer's here, which mean you need to take it outside - the cooking, the eating and the drinking. We combed through the Los Angeles Times Test Kitchen's recipes archive for dishes that are perfect for long, leisurely afternoons and evenings spent entertaining outdoors, barbecuing with friends and family. We bring you 89 of our favorite recipes that will help you beat the summer heat that's heading our way. We've got sangrias, salads, ice creams, gazpachos, brownies and so much more.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Given that many parts of Southern California only truly experience summer heat for a few scant weeks, it's unfortunate that two of the area's most prominent specialty music festivals, Rock the Bells and the Sunset Strip Music Festival, opted to book their big outdoor events smack in the middle of season. But this weekend as the temperature peaks and the asphalt starts to burn, both will celebrate the past, present, and future of music - albeit with little artistic overlap. Rock the Bells has become the premier hip-hop festival for a reason: Its bookers understand that the music in 2012 is an umbrella term that encompasses many varieties and generations of fans, each of which may need a little schooling in the listening habits of the others.
SCIENCE
August 6, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
Exceedingly high summer temperatures, longer summers and related catastrophes, such as wildfire and drought, are poised to be the norm, and they are driven by climate change, according to a new research paper published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. In an opinion article over the weekend in the Washington Post that previewed the findings , the paper's lead author, James E. Hansen wrote: “It is no longer enough to say that global warming will increase the likelihood of extreme weather and to repeat the caveat that no individual weather event can be directly linked to climate change.
NATIONAL
September 8, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
Texas fire officials have brought some major blazes under control, allowing residents to return to their homes, but warned that the state may still face more fires given record summer heat and drought. During the last week, firefighters across the state have responded to 176 wildfires that burned 126,844 acres, according to the Texas Forest Service. The largest fire, in the Bastrop area east of Austin, has destroyed 1,386 homes, a state record for a single fire. Firefighters had the blaze 30% contained Thursday and expected to make headway in the coming days, but local officials warned that they could see more fires if hot, dry conditions persisted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2010 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
Summer, which seemingly fled Los Angeles this year, will make a brief cameo this week. Forecasters say a high-pressure system moving in from Arizona and New Mexico will boost temperatures to between 90 and 104 degrees in the San Gabriel and San Fernando valleys, making for a heat wave that is to begin on Sunday and peak on Monday. One of the Southland's perennial hot spots, Woodland Hills, could reach the triple digits, and Pasadena may hit the mid-90s early this week. "The summer heat has finally arrived," said Bonnie Bartling, a weather specialist at the National Weather Service office in Oxnard.
SCIENCE
August 29, 2009 | From Times Staff And Wire Reports
Bouts of extreme muggy heat lasting for days, once rare in California, are becoming more frequent and intense due to ocean patterns altered by climate change, scientists said in a study released Tuesday. Research meteorologists at the University of California's Scripps Institution of Oceanography reached the conclusion after examining a severe 2006 summer heat wave that was blamed for the deaths of 600 people and 25,000 cattle in California. That heat wave, like others before it, combined high humidity and heat, keeping temperatures elevated at night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1992 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the mercury soared above 90 degrees in parts of Orange County Monday, merchants who make money off the heat were sweating to keep up. "We're swamped," said Maurice Maio, whose air conditioning repair service got more than 300 calls from Orange and Riverside counties Monday. "We had the June gloom, and now we get the big surprise. We've been waiting for this." Southland residents should not be shocked by the swelter.
WORLD
September 1, 2007 | Asso Ahmed and Tina Susman, Special to The Times
A cholera outbreak in northern Iraq, where thousands of people have sought refuge from sectarian violence, is overwhelming hospitals and has killed as many as 10 people, health officials said Friday. The outbreak in Sulaymaniya and Kirkuk is seen as the latest example of the displacement and deterioration of living conditions caused by the Iraqi conflict. The water-borne disease has struck more than 80 people in the two cities, which are about 100 miles apart, said Claire Hajaj of the U.N.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2009 | Hector Becerra and Alexandra Zavis
For much of Southern California, this has been the summer the air conditioner stayed off. The recession and vacant foreclosed houses have played a role. But so has a season that has been marked by overcast skies and relatively mild temperatures. So you could hardly blame employees of a water park for being thankful for the heat wave that descended on the Southland on Tuesday, bringing much-needed crowds. "I get up and do my little sun dance every morning," said Mary Papadopoulos of Raging Waters in San Dimas on Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2007 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
The 2007 summer movie season may have just come to an end, but Hollywood already is intensely focused on the holiday seasons looming far in the distance. The third "Narnia" film, "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader," has been set for May 7, 2010 -- although not a foot of film has been shot. DreamWorks and Paramount, meanwhile, announced that they have penciled in June 26, 2009, for their "Transformers 2" -- even though there's no finished script or production start date.
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