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Summer Olympic Games

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NEWS
December 5, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles organizers today will announce intentions to bid for the 2012 Summer Olympics. The bid is expected to show enough readiness that it could be workable in 2004, should preparations for the Athens Olympics falter. Los Angeles held Olympic Games in 1932 and 1984, and a third would be unprecedented. The key to the bid is existing facilities. A to-do list of expensive construction work is short.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
June 25, 2013 | By David Wharton
The International Olympic Committee has released its technical evaluation of three cities vying for the 2020 Summer Games. And the news is good for Tokyo. The 110-page report  gives a first look at how the voting may go when IOC members cast their ballots in September. Tokyo, which hosted the 1964 Olympics, received praise for its transportation system and for being "a modern, dynamic city that sets global trends and, at the same time, has a strong respect for its history and culture.
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SPORTS
July 19, 1995 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his office overlooking the imaginary circle from the Georgia World Congress Center through the heart of Atlanta, the so-called Olympic ring, Billy Payne, a former Georgia Bulldog defensive end and now organizing committee president for the 1996 Summer Games, has a small television screen that allows him to monitor construction of the Olympic Stadium. With each feed, the Centennial Olympics, which begin one year from today, become more real to Payne.
WORLD
December 15, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Britain will assign as many as 13,500 troops to help secure next year's Summer Olympics on home soil, a military presence larger than the country's deployment in Afghanistan. The troops are to provide backup for police and to help protect venues before and during the two-week global sporting event in July in London, which Defense Secretary Philip Hammond on Thursday called "the biggest security challenge this country has faced for decades. " The military contingent will be part of a massive security detail that has ballooned in cost from about $440 million to nearly $863 million.
NEWS
July 28, 1985 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Native Koreans call their country Choson , which means Land of the Morning Calm. But a morning in Seoul, the capital, is anything but calm. In the countryside, Koreans say the first sound they hear at sunrise is the mournful cry of a magpie. In Seoul, it is the relentless pounding of a jackhammer. Take a cable car to the top of Namsan Mountain and look at this Oriental boomtown, the world's ninth-largest metropolis with a population of 9.2 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Green Light at NBC: Two sophomore comedy series--"Blossom" and "Seinfeld"--have been renewed for next season by NBC. The network also said Tuesday that both shows will have early season premieres following the Summer Olympic Games.
SPORTS
September 8, 2005 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa pledged his full support Wednesday as Los Angeles became the first U.S. entrant into the race for the 2016 Summer Olympic Games. "I stand ready, willing, able and excited about bidding for the 2016 Games," Villaraigosa said at a news conference in the courtyard of the Amateur Athletic Foundation, a legacy of the $232.5-million profit generated by the 1984 Summer Games. As in 1984, the Games would be privately financed and a significant surplus is all but assured.
SPORTS
July 25, 2004 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
Paris, London and Los Angeles are the only cities that have played host to the Summer Olympic Games twice. Paris and London are currently in a five-way race for the 2012 Games -- along with New York, Madrid and Moscow. The International Olympic Committee will choose the 2012 winner next July. Where does that leave Los Angeles? In the mix for 2016, perhaps. Or 2020. Or 2024, and beyond. This is because in L.A.
OPINION
December 10, 2000
The red ink from last summer's Democratic National Convention is barely dry but already there is serious talk of a Los Angeles bid for the 2012 Summer Olympic Games. Crazy? Not at all; Los Angeles proved itself an able host for the Summer Games in 1984. But as local organizers assemble a bid to put before the International Olympic Committee they need to address head-on and immediately, not down the road, key questions of finance and logistics.
NEWS
December 5, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles organizers today will announce intentions to bid for the 2012 Summer Olympics. The bid is expected to show enough readiness that it could be workable in 2004, should preparations for the Athens Olympics falter. Los Angeles held Olympic Games in 1932 and 1984, and a third would be unprecedented. The key to the bid is existing facilities. A to-do list of expensive construction work is short.
NEWS
July 20, 1996 | JENNIFER FREY and CHRISTINE BRENNAN, WASHINGTON POST
One hundred years ago the modern Olympics began and Friday night the 1996 Summer Olympic Games opened with hundreds of reminders of that anniversary. The sounds of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra echoed through Olympic Stadium on a steamy Southern night during which 100 children would gather on the field to form the number "100," 100 percussionists would play backup to the orchestra and 100 U.S. Army trumpeters would herald the arrival of the Olympic flag.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1996 | KAREN SCHWARTZ, Karen Schwartz writes for the Associated Press
Go West, young man. Or North. Or even to Hawaii. Just don't even think about using your frequent-flier points to go to the hot spots in the Southeast this summer. "There's a bottleneck caused by the Olympics, with Atlanta being a hub city," said Randy Petersen, editor and publisher of InsideFlyer. "People are flying into Tallahassee and renting cars" to drive to Atlanta, he said. "That whole area has been glutted by the over-popularity of the Olympics." But there is a silver lining.
NEWS
July 20, 1996 | JENNIFER FREY and CHRISTINE BRENNAN, WASHINGTON POST
One hundred years ago the modern Olympics began and Friday night the 1996 Summer Olympic Games opened with hundreds of reminders of that anniversary. The sounds of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra echoed through Olympic Stadium on a steamy Southern night during which 100 children would gather on the field to form the number "100," 100 percussionists would play backup to the orchestra and 100 U.S. Army trumpeters would herald the arrival of the Olympic flag.
SPORTS
April 10, 1996 | MIKE DOWNEY
After 16 theoretical vestal virgins oversaw an Olympic torch-passing ceremony here Saturday night, the Greek prime minister, Costas Simitis, boarded an aptly named Olympic Airways commercial jet the next morning and flew to Washington for his first official visit there. He planted a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, made a speech at the National Press Club and then prepared to meet with President Clinton to discuss, among other subjects, Greece's strained relations with Turkey.
SPORTS
July 19, 1995 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jackie Joyner-Kersee and Sergei Bubka will be back, but can Carl Lewis cast aside his injuries and illnesses to make a run--and/or jump--for double figures in gold medals? Hakeem the Dream will play for the team named after him, but will Vlade Divac and his Serbian teammates be allowed to play if the war still rages in Bosnia? After retiring once and for all, Bela Karolyi is again preparing gymnasts, but can former world champions Kim Zmeskal and Svetlana Boguinskaya still compete at that level?
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