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Summer Squash

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FOOD
April 29, 2010
Stuffed summer squash Total time: 1 hour, 10 minutes Servings: 10 to 12 Note: Adapted from Sotera Jaime. Look for smaller squash to avoid large seeds in the filling. 2 quarts water 2 teaspoons salt, plus more to taste 2 1/2 pounds small to medium yellow crookneck squash (about 8 to 10 squash) 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 cup finely diced onion 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 cup finely diced button mushrooms 1 1/2 cups crumbled queso fresco 1/4 cup plus 1 teaspoon finely chopped parsley Fresh ground black pepper 1. Heat the oven to 350 degrees.
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FOOD
August 18, 2012
If you think you hate zucchini, or that it's simply boring, it's probably because it wasn't prepared right. Contrary to popular wisdom, summer squash is at its worst when cooked to "crisp-tender. " It really needs time to develop its full sweet, nutty flavor. Of all the myriad ways of preparing zucchini, there are two basic preparations every cook should know. Glazing: Cut the zucchini into good-sized chunks, put it in a pan with enough water to cover the bottom and a good glug of olive oil and maybe a smashed garlic clove (no, make that certainly)
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FOOD
October 15, 1992 | MARCIA CONE and THELMA SNYDER, Cone and Snyder are cookbook authors. and
Sometimes it seems as if summer squash won't ever go away. Even if you don't grow your own zucchini, it seems to be everywhere. Count your blessings: These tender, easy-to-digest vegetables make not only a tasty side dish but a wonderful main dish too. If you have a choice, take the small zucchini and yellow squash that are three to six inches in length. They should feel firm and heavy for their small size, indicating sweet and tender flesh.
FOOD
August 18, 2012
There are hundreds of varieties of summer squash sold as zucchini, but they break down into two main families. Though they can be used interchangeably, each has different strengths. The familiar deep green cylindrical zucchini tends to have the best flavor, and the darker the zucchini, the better it is. But the flesh can be soft and breaks down when cooked. The light gray-green slightly bulbous zucchini, which is common at Latino and Middle Eastern markets, has a milder taste but denser, firmer flesh that holds together during cooking.
FOOD
August 23, 1990 | EVAN KLEIMAN and VIANA LA PLACE, Kleiman and La Place have co-authored "Cucina Fresca," "Pasta Fresca," and "Cucina Rustica." Kleiman is co-owner of Angeli restaurants; La Place is a food writer and cooking teacher. and
The warm Southern California summers provide the climate summer squash needs to proliferate--and proliferate it does. In fact, one need only mention zucchini and most gardeners will begin to smile. Lots of sunshine and very fertile soil are the fundamentals for raising a boom crop of this versatile vegetable. Part of a botanical family that includes winter squash, pumpkins, cucumbers and melons, summer squash comes in a variety of colors and shapes.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | PEGGY Y. LEE
If you're a farmer, you can tell that summer is coming when the days get very long and the squash is ready for picking. Of the summer squashes, the Italian marrow, more commonly known as zucchini, is perhaps the most famous. Its distinctive green coloring and mild flavor make it a favorite of many cooks. Zucchini is believed to have originally come from South Africa. It can be grown in most places that have warm weather, including the Ventura County area.
FOOD
August 18, 2012
There are hundreds of varieties of summer squash sold as zucchini, but they break down into two main families. Though they can be used interchangeably, each has different strengths. The familiar deep green cylindrical zucchini tends to have the best flavor, and the darker the zucchini, the better it is. But the flesh can be soft and breaks down when cooked. The light gray-green slightly bulbous zucchini, which is common at Latino and Middle Eastern markets, has a milder taste but denser, firmer flesh that holds together during cooking.
REAL ESTATE
April 23, 1989 | BILL SIDNAM, Sidnam has written garden columns and features for The Times since 1975. and
Smaller is better when it comes to winter squash. For instance, a huge banana or hubbard squash usually provides too much eating for the average family. Once cut, the remainder of the squash tends to lose its quality rapidly. That's where acorn squash has its advantage. When cut in half, each half is a perfect size for an individual serving, and it can be baked and served right in its shell. In years past it wasn't practical for the average gardener to grow acorn squash.
FOOD
August 15, 1991 | ROSALIND CREASY
For years, I was lucky enough to have a mailman who would take my extra zucchini. I left them by my mailbox and he would give them a home with zucchini-loving patrons on his route. Then he retired. Summer wouldn't be summer without the "summer squash shuffle," the yearly ritual of sharing the bountiful harvest with family and friends. Fortunately, finding a home for extra zucchini is a small price to pay for such a rewarding vegetable.
FOOD
August 8, 2007 | Russ Parsons, Times Staff Writer
Peaking Zucchini: How complicated can choosing zucchini be? After all, most people's biggest problem usually seems to be getting rid of all that garden-grown stuff. Well, there are more than 100 different varieties of zucchini grown today, ranging in color from gray-green to almost black and in shape from long and thin as a hot dog to bulbous. Which to choose? It depends on how you're going to use them.
NEWS
August 13, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
Bright yellow summer squash stuffed with a mixture of sauteed onions, mushrooms, cheese and chopped fresh parsley. Simple and flavorful, the dish takes just over an hour to prepare and makes for a filling light meal or a substantial side. I'd even argue the leftovers taste better reheated the next day. For more quick-fix dinner ideas, check out our video recipe gallery . Food editor Russ Parsons and Test Kitchen manager Noelle Carter show you how to fix a dozen dishes in an hour or less.
FOOD
August 8, 2007 | Russ Parsons, Times Staff Writer
Peaking Zucchini: How complicated can choosing zucchini be? After all, most people's biggest problem usually seems to be getting rid of all that garden-grown stuff. Well, there are more than 100 different varieties of zucchini grown today, ranging in color from gray-green to almost black and in shape from long and thin as a hot dog to bulbous. Which to choose? It depends on how you're going to use them.
FOOD
July 19, 2006 | Russ Parsons, Times Staff Writer
FROM all over the globe they come to Los Angeles, unknown or overlooked at home and hoping to make it big. And so it was for the zucchini. But while it seems that almost everyone else who has come to Southern California and wound up famous has been memorialized by a statue, a star in the sidewalk or even been elected governor, nowhere is there a monument to the zucchini and the region's role in its meteoric rise to fame.
FOOD
October 11, 2000 | DONNA DEANE
On a recent visit to the farmers market, I picked up the most beautiful golden zucchini. They look like the green variety except they have a deep golden skin and bright green stem. I think they even may be a little sweeter than green zucchini, and because the flavor is so sweet and delicate, I did not want to mask it with strong flavors. So I cut the zucchini into 2-inch pieces and microwaved them with fresh dill. I did add a small amount of butter with a bit of salt just before serving.
HEALTH
May 3, 1999 | SHELDON MARGEN and DALE A. OGAR, Dr. Sheldon Margen is professor of public health at UC Berkeley; Dale A. Ogar is managing editor of the UC Berkeley Wellness Letter. They are the authors of several books, including "The Wellness Encyclopedia of Food and Nutrition."
It's getting to be that time of year when you and/or several friends and acquaintances will have more zucchini growing than you know what to do with. Last year one of our colleagues showed up with a basketful of magnificent zucchini specimens. We were grateful--we said thank you. Two days later, another old friend, now retired and with plenty of time for gardening, dropped by 40 green, succulent zucchinis. We were grateful--we said thank you.
FOOD
July 29, 1998 | LEILAH BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Long before fast-food restaurants and beach cafes dotted the California landscape, California cuisine meant Mexican home cooking. California, after all, was once know as Alta California. For a century, Mexican foods and flavors were the culinary staples, and masa, tortillas, frijoles, salsas and hot peppers were the culinary tools with which home cooks worked. When Spanish colonialists began arriving in California from Mexico in the 18th century, they brought their cooking traditions with them.
FOOD
August 20, 1992 | RUSS PARSONS
You think you've got it bad, sneaking onto your neighbor's porch in the dead of night to dump paper bags of excess zucchini? How would you like to have to sell the stuff? "It's a pretty tough market right now," confides one grower. "Everybody and his brother has zucchini in the back yard." Right now most summer squash is coming from the cool Santa Maria Valley, along the Central Coast.
FOOD
October 14, 1993 | RUSS PARSONS, TIMES FOOD MANAGING EDITOR
This year, it seems, summer lasted all of about two weeks. It was a fairly miserable season for tomatoes and basil and other things that take sunny dry days to ripen. No sooner did their prime time begin than it was over. I still have tomatoes on the vine--some ripe, some not--but to tell the truth, I really don't feel like eating them. For me, eating tomatoes and eggplants and the like takes the same intensely hot weather that growing them does.
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