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Summer Youth Employment Program

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1985 | G.\f7 M. Bush \f7
A Summer Youth Employment Program is expected to create jobs while offering employers sizable tax credits on salaries, city officials said. All Orange County employers are eligible to hire from the pool of 16- to 22-year-olds in the program, said John Janda, a spokesman for Santa Ana Employment Services. Youths are available for office, production, sales and service jobs, he said, and the Employment Services office will match prospective employers and qualified youths.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2000 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to a recent escalation in gang violence, the Los Angeles City Council on Friday approved spending $2 million over the next month to put 2,000 teenagers to work in the city's summer jobs program. "We need to keep certain youngsters from being at risk during the time of the year when they are the most idle," said Councilman Mark Ridley-Thomas, who called for the council to nearly double the size of its work program.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1996
Much to the relief of civic leaders, federal officials announced Friday that they will restore $17.8 million in funding to provide 13,000 summer and 2,000 year-round jobs for low-income teenagers in Los Angeles. Federal budget cuts had threatened to eliminate the jobs program this year--idling thousands of young people and putting an end to hundreds of community cleanup and day-care programs staffed by teenagers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1997
A Los Angeles summer job program for low- and moderate-income youths has received a 36% boost in funding this year, Mayor Richard Riordan announced Tuesday. Riordan said the $6-million increase in the federally funded Summer Youth Employment Program will translate into 4,000 more jobs for 14- to 21-year-olds who live in the city. In all, $23.7 million has been earmarked to put about 14,000 youths to work during the traditional break from school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1997
A Los Angeles summer job program for low- and moderate-income youths has received a 36% boost in funding this year, Mayor Richard Riordan announced Tuesday. Riordan said the $6-million increase in the federally funded Summer Youth Employment Program will translate into 4,000 more jobs for 14- to 21-year-olds who live in the city. In all, $23.7 million has been earmarked to put about 14,000 youths to work during the traditional break from school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1992 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The arrival of hundreds of youths recruited for two city-funded work experience programs coincided with a rash of vandalism at City Hall--including carvings of nicknames and slogans in mirrors, beveled-glass windows and brass panels in the building's tower, officials said Wednesday. Leaders of the youth programs strongly denied suggestions by some city officials that a handful of the young employees may be responsible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Much to the relief of civic leaders, federal officials announced Friday that they will restore $17.8 million in funding to provide 13,000 summer and 2,000 year-round jobs for low-income teenagers in Los Angeles. Federal budget cuts had threatened to eliminate the jobs program this year--idling thousands of young people and putting an end to hundreds of community cleanup and day-care programs staffed by the teens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1994 | SUSAN BYRNES
The sandpaper, power drills and paintbrushes they wield look ordinary, but the 15 Millikan Middle School students sprucing up their campus this summer are actually toiling in the experimental. As part of the Summer Youth Employment Program run by the Los Angeles Unified School District and the city of Los Angeles, Millikan and four other campuses in the district are testing a work-based learning program that teaches real-world skills to at-risk and low-income teen-agers.
NEWS
March 30, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal budget cuts are threatening to eliminate 15,000 summer jobs for low-income youths in Los Angeles, putting an end to many recreation, community cleanup and day-care programs and making for a long summer for thousands of idle teenagers. The $870-million summer youth employment program--a national effort to hire low-income teens to work for nonprofit community groups--was scuttled by Congress during last year's budget battles.
NEWS
June 5, 1996 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rafael Perez didn't talk much about it when his father died. "Son, have a good day. Come right home." That's the last thing his dad said to him, the same thing he'd said every day before Rafael went to school. But this time, he checked himself out of the neighborhood for good while Rafael was gone. Rafael, now 16, turned a cold eye on anyone who wanted to poke around in his pain. "Man, he died," he would tell the teachers and the guys at school when they asked. "Leave it alone."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Much to the relief of civic leaders, federal officials announced Friday that they will restore $17.8 million in funding to provide 13,000 summer and 2,000 year-round jobs for low-income teenagers in Los Angeles. Federal budget cuts had threatened to eliminate the jobs program this year--idling thousands of young people and putting an end to hundreds of community cleanup and day-care programs staffed by the teens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1996
Much to the relief of civic leaders, federal officials announced Friday that they will restore $17.8 million in funding to provide 13,000 summer and 2,000 year-round jobs for low-income teenagers in Los Angeles. Federal budget cuts had threatened to eliminate the jobs program this year--idling thousands of young people and putting an end to hundreds of community cleanup and day-care programs staffed by teenagers.
NEWS
March 30, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal budget cuts are threatening to eliminate 15,000 summer jobs for low-income youths in Los Angeles, putting an end to many recreation, community cleanup and day-care programs and making for a long summer for thousands of idle teenagers. The $870-million summer youth employment program--a national effort to hire low-income teens to work for nonprofit community groups--was scuttled by Congress during last year's budget battles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1995 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Presiding over one of a series of federal budget-cutting sessions recently, Rep. Ron Packard (R-Oceanside) was in no mood to hear excuses. Like his fellow "cardinals"--a title afforded to chairmen of House Appropriations subcommittees--Packard needed to slash the budgets of the agencies under his panel's jurisdiction. Everything, he had proclaimed, from new book purchases for the blind by the Library of Congress to the planned renovation of the Botanic Gardens, was on the table.
NEWS
June 5, 1996 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rafael Perez didn't talk much about it when his father died. "Son, have a good day. Come right home." That's the last thing his dad said to him, the same thing he'd said every day before Rafael went to school. But this time, he checked himself out of the neighborhood for good while Rafael was gone. Rafael, now 16, turned a cold eye on anyone who wanted to poke around in his pain. "Man, he died," he would tell the teachers and the guys at school when they asked. "Leave it alone."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1992 | JEFF PRUGH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It won't be easy for 17-year-old Maggie Hernandez of Sylmar and her friend, Rosie Sanchez, 18, of Pacoima to get to their summer jobs as file clerks in the Chicano studies department at Cal State Northridge. For the sake of $5.47 per hour, the two young women, friends since early childhood, will be spending long stints on RTD buses every day--the ride from Sylmar to CSUN takes more than an hour, and from Pacoima more than 30 minutes one way.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1994 | SUSAN BYRNES
The sandpaper, power drills and paintbrushes they wield look ordinary, but the 15 Millikan Middle School students sprucing up their campus this summer are actually toiling in the experimental. As part of the Summer Youth Employment Program run by the Los Angeles Unified School District and the city of Los Angeles, Millikan and four other campuses in the district are testing a work-based learning program that teaches real-world skills to at-risk and low-income teen-agers.
NEWS
July 11, 1993 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ
The city's Summer Jobs Program, the main citywide employment vehicle for youths from poor families, began this week with about $12 million less in funding--and about half as many jobs--than last summer. The cutback means that 10,000 fewer youths than last year will be employed this summer, officials said. Under the federally funded program, 14- to 21-year-olds work for six weeks at community-based organizations and government agencies. Last year the city received funding for about 21,000 jobs.
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