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Summit Meetings

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OPINION
June 15, 2002
Poets speak of mountains as eternal. The ancients feared them as the abodes of dragons or demons. Nineteenth century climbers went to conquer them. Modern climbers toil to cleanse them of the trash left by their predecessors. And mountains are far too often the stage for rebellion and warfare. In fact, high mountains are fragile and subject to environmental damage, swarmed by tourism and chipped away by indiscriminate development.
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WORLD
November 24, 2008 | Patrick J. McDonnell, McDonnell is a Times staff writer.
President Bush and other world leaders vowed Sunday to act "quickly and decisively" to battle the global economic crisis as a 21-nation summit predicted worldwide recovery in 18 months. But the final declaration from the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum was short on specifics, beyond a vow by participating nations to avoid pressures to implement "protectionist" measures, such as import restrictions.
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REAL ESTATE
August 19, 1990
The first two of a projected series of "summit meetings" designed to promote communication among developers, city officials and the public will be held Sept. 18 and Oct. 18 at the Jonathan Club, 545 S. Figueroa St. in downtown Los Angeles. The 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2007 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The Jazz Summit performance at Catalina Bar & Grill on Sunday was much more than a gathering of first-rate talent. Yes, it was a rare treat to hear trumpeter Roy Hargrove, saxophonist Ernie Watts, pianists Gerald Clayton and Tamir Hendelman, guitarist Bruce Forman and singer Roberta Gambarini, among others, on the same stage, in the same program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1990
The pomp of superpower summit meetings in television's full color is so familiar to many Americans that it is sometimes hard to remember a world without it. Here comes the swept-wing airliner, rocking gently to a stop just before it swallows up the cameras. There come leaders to the top of the ramp, in floodlight or in daylight, aides holding umbrellas as needed. And here are the presidents, smiling broadly just before everybody except interpreters is invited out of their meeting room.
OPINION
October 12, 1986 | Raymond L. Garthoff, Raymond L. Garthoff, a retired U.S. diplomat now a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, is author of "Detente and Confrontation: American-Soviet Relations from Nixon to Reagan" (Brookings).
The Reykjavik meeting between President Ronald Reagan and Soviet General Secre tary Mikhail S. Gorbachev is a justified exception to the generally sound rule that summit meetings should be carefully prepared and have predictable results. In view of the suddenness of the decision, shortly before the meeting was to occur, and its evident ad hoc and interim nature, there is, fortunately, little public expectation of dramatic results.
NEWS
June 4, 1990
In the wake of the Washington summit, what are the key issues that remain unresolved? "The most important issue concerns the problems of Germany and the shape of European security. It is not just the question of Germany in NATO; in the rush toward German reunification, little thought has been given by either side to the reshaping of Europe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1987 | ERNEST CONINE, Ernest Conine is a Times editorial writer
The president of a prestigious New England educational institution, who also happens to be a long-time observer of U.S.-Soviet affairs, worried the other day that President Reagan may be "too anxious" for a summit meeting with Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev.
NEWS
May 28, 1988 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
European analysts feel rather ho-hum about the impending summit in Moscow. They do not expect much to happen and, from the European point of view, that is probably a plus. President Reagan shocked Europeans in October, 1986, when, without consulting them, he came close to reaching agreement with Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev at Reykjavik, Iceland, on a ban on all nuclear missiles.
OPINION
June 7, 1987
Little of substance is likely to emerge from this week's economic summit meeting in Venice. Despite a stunning array of economic problems around the world, the meeting seems certain to be less a workshop and more a 19th-Century salon, with leaders gathering to see and be seen--and be photographed reassuring one another that things will somehow be better when those who are still in office meet again next year.
SPORTS
October 12, 2002 | BOB MIESZERSKI
Tailor Fit and A Ransom, who have combined to win 40 of 66 starts and more than $2.2 million, will square off again in tonight's $200,000 Los Alamitos Invitational Championship. A Grade I at 440 yards, the Championship will mark the first meeting between the superstars since Tailor Fit won the Champion of Champions here Dec. 16. A Ransom, the 1-2 favorite that night, was third, three-quarters of a length behind the winner.
OPINION
June 15, 2002
Poets speak of mountains as eternal. The ancients feared them as the abodes of dragons or demons. Nineteenth century climbers went to conquer them. Modern climbers toil to cleanse them of the trash left by their predecessors. And mountains are far too often the stage for rebellion and warfare. In fact, high mountains are fragile and subject to environmental damage, swarmed by tourism and chipped away by indiscriminate development.
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eschewing first-name familiarity, President Clinton and President Vladimir V. Putin--one nearing his departure from office, the other just arriving--plunged into wide-ranging discussions Saturday night as U.S.-Russian relations appeared to be approaching an anxious moment.
NEWS
November 2, 1999 | EDWIN CHEN and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Amid growing concern that the Middle East peace process is stagnating again, President Clinton met separately with the Israeli and Palestinian leaders here Monday to nudge them toward an agreement on a final treaty. Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak and Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat held their own face-to-face meeting late Monday. The three men are to meet together today. Despite these sessions, no substantive breakthroughs are expected out of the two-day summit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1998 | ANTHONY LAKE, Anthony Lake is a professor at Georgetown University and chairman of the Newmarket Co
The message was on my phone machine when I returned from a trip a few weeks ago. A reporter's voice reminded me that as President Clinton's national security advisor, I had been in the People's Republic of China in the summer of 1996, meeting with senior Chinese officials--including Gen. Liu Huaqing. Did I know that at the same time, the general's daughter, a Chinese aerospace executive, was giving campaign contributions to Democratic fund-raiser Johnny Chung?
NEWS
October 30, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a frank public clash over human rights, President Clinton told Chinese President Jiang Zemin on Wednesday that China's behavior is on the "wrong side of history," and Jiang responded that human rights and freedoms are "relative" terms.
NEWS
November 21, 1996 | From Associated Press
Five days before President Clinton and 17 other world leaders are to meet in the Philippines, police discovered a pipe bomb, hand grenades and a timing device in two of the nation's most sensitive places: Manila airport and the chief site for the leaders' summit. The discovery of the devices Wednesday overshadowed meetings of lower-level officials in advance of the annual Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1987 | ARCHIE BROWN, Archie Brown, who teaches at Oxford University in England, is a specialist on Soviet politics
How much the Moscow jockeying over the on-off-apparently on summit meeting is a matter of Soviet attempts to extract concessions from President Reagan on the Strategic Defense Initiative is still not clear. It almost certainly had a part to play, for the Soviet leadership feels at least as strongly about this issue as Reagan does. In the Soviet Union, however, as well as in the United States, summitry is not just about arms control.
NEWS
November 21, 1996 | From Associated Press
Five days before President Clinton and 17 other world leaders are to meet in the Philippines, police discovered a pipe bomb, hand grenades and a timing device in two of the nation's most sensitive places: Manila airport and the chief site for the leaders' summit. The discovery of the devices Wednesday overshadowed meetings of lower-level officials in advance of the annual Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit.
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