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NEWS
April 19, 2001 | From Associated Press
Six Canadians accused of planning violence at this weekend's Summit of the Americas have been arrested, and officials Wednesday displayed seized weapons that included small explosives and smoke grenades. Inspector Robert Poeti of the Quebec Provincial Police said increased security for the Friday-Sunday summit, where 34 leaders from the Western Hemisphere will gather, led to the arrests of two 21-year-old men driving into Quebec City and four men in the Montreal area.
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WORLD
April 16, 2012 | By Christi Parsons and Matea Gold, Los Angeles Times
CARTAGENA, Colombia — Despite strong opposition from his allies in the U.S. labor movement, President Obama said Sunday that he trusted Colombian authorities to improve protections for workers and union leaders as he cleared the final obstacle for implementation of a free trade agreement next month. The decision marks a victory for the U.S. business community, which has pushed the White House to increase commercial opportunities in Colombia's growing economy. The pact eliminates duties on most exports, eases travel restrictions and strengthens intellectual property rights.
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NEWS
December 10, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its first display of concrete progress, even before its formal opening, the Summit of the Americas produced an $84-million bailout for Haiti on Friday that will allow the stricken Caribbean nation to qualify for a series of loans reaching $250 million. American officials said Haiti was so far behind in paying off previous international loans that without the new aid it would have been unable to gain access to crucial assistance from the major international lending institutions.
NATIONAL
April 15, 2012 | By Christi Parsons and Matea Gold, Washington Bureau
CARTAGENA, Colombia - President Obama said Sunday he would be angry if an internal investigation showed Secret Service personnel engaged in misconduct while in Colombia, because he expected representatives of the U.S. to act with the "utmost in dignity and probity. " But as he finished a weekend meeting with other Western Hemisphere leaders here, Obama said he would wait until the investigation concluded before passing judgment on the agents and military officers, part of a team that he said performed "extraordinary work on a day-to-day basis protecting me, my family and U.S. officials.
WORLD
November 7, 2005 | Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writer
Undeterred by a setback at the Summit of the Americas, President Bush on Sunday renewed his drive for hemispheric free trade, declaring that open markets would energize economies and foster social justice at a time when some in Latin America sought to "roll back the democratic progress of the past two decades."
WORLD
November 6, 2005 | Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writer
President Bush has said immigration reform ranks near the top of his second-term agenda, but he and Mexican President Vicente Fox passed up an opportunity this weekend to discuss the controversial issue at a hemispheric summit here. The omission raised fresh questions about whether Bush will be able to push through Congress a guest-worker program that is dividing members of his own party.
NEWS
December 6, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton and the leaders of 33 other Western Hemisphere nations will set a goal of creating a free-trade zone joining the United States, Canada and all of Latin America when they meet this weekend in Miami in the first hemisphere-wide summit conference in a generation, officials said Monday. Clinton Administration officials said that the most difficult issue to resolve in establishing the goal is a target date.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1994 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's high-technology, energy and medical industries should be big winners if hemispheric free trade agreement set in motion Sunday by President Clinton and 33 other leaders at the Summit of the Americas in Miami comes to pass, but the states' agricultural and manufacturing sectors might be among the losers. Economists said the proposed agreement, which would eliminate tariffs and other barriers to trade among all the nation's of North and South America, would generally benefit U.S.
NEWS
April 20, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After three months of diplomatic warmups, President Bush takes on the hemisphere this weekend when he joins 33 other leaders of the Americas in Quebec City to work out details for the world's largest and most ambitious trade bloc. "The sooner we get a free-trade agreement for the Americas in place, the better off the continent will be," Bush said Thursday as he prepared for his first international summit.
NEWS
April 19, 1998 | JONATHAN PETERSON and SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As leaders of 34 nations gathered here for the second Summit of the Americas, White House officials Saturday pressed a series of measures to preserve political freedom and ensure that the region's fledgling democracies do not backslide toward a darker past.
WORLD
April 14, 2012 | By Matea Gold and David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Eleven Secret Service agents and five members of the U.S. military working on a security team preparing for President Obama's arrival at a regional summit in Colombia were under investigation Saturday for apparent misconduct involving prostitutes. The incident occurred early Thursday at the Hotel Caribe, a historic beachfront hotel where the advance team was staying in the Caribbean resort city of Cartagena. The episode began when police and hotel personnel began checking hotel rooms as part of the strict security surrounding the weekend Summit of the Americas, according to a U.S. official who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss the investigation.
WORLD
April 14, 2012 | By Christi Parsons and Michael A. Memoli, Los Angeles Times
CARTAGENA, Colombia - As many as a dozen Secret Service agents have been sent home from the Summit of the Americas here this weekend because of allegations of "misconduct," U.S. officials said late Friday. The agents were relieved of duty at the summit and replaced with new agents, according to a Secret Service spokesman. The activities that resulted in the sudden transfer of agents took place prior to President Obama's arrival in Colombia on Friday afternoon, according to sources familiar with the matter.
WORLD
April 13, 2012 | By Christi Parsons and Brian Bennett, Los Angeles Times
CARTAGENA, Colombia - President Obama will highlight trade and business opportunities in Latin America at a regional summit in Colombia this weekend, but other leaders may upstage him by pushing to legalize marijuana and other illicit drugs in a bid to stem rampant trafficking. Obama, who opposes decriminalization, is expected to face a rocky reception in this Caribbean resort city, which otherwise forms a friendly backdrop for a U.S. president courting Latino voters in an election year.
WORLD
November 7, 2005 | Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writer
Undeterred by a setback at the Summit of the Americas, President Bush on Sunday renewed his drive for hemispheric free trade, declaring that open markets would energize economies and foster social justice at a time when some in Latin America sought to "roll back the democratic progress of the past two decades."
WORLD
November 6, 2005 | Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writer
President Bush has said immigration reform ranks near the top of his second-term agenda, but he and Mexican President Vicente Fox passed up an opportunity this weekend to discuss the controversial issue at a hemispheric summit here. The omission raised fresh questions about whether Bush will be able to push through Congress a guest-worker program that is dividing members of his own party.
WORLD
November 6, 2005 | Patrick J. McDonnell and Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writers
President Bush left the country before the conclusion of a two-day summit here as key South American leaders rejected the White House's vision for a free-trade zone that would stretch from the Arctic to the southern tip of South America. Fierce opposition from the populist presidents of the continent's three largest economies -- Brazil, Argentina and Venezuela -- thwarted the resuscitation of the so-called Free Trade Area of the Americas, or FTAA.
NEWS
December 10, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton opened the first summit meeting of Western Hemisphere leaders in a generation Friday with a call for a new free-trade "partnership for prosperity"--plus a plea to U.S. voters to credit him with the creation of millions of new jobs.
NEWS
April 23, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He was chummy, wrapping his arm around the prime minister of a small Caribbean nation, sharing his limo with Mexico's chief executive and pulling Panama's small president, the only female at the gathering, into the front row for a group photo when no one could see her in the back. He was deferentially low-key, listening more often than talking.
WORLD
November 5, 2005 | Patrick J. McDonnell and Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writers
A hemispheric summit to promote job creation and the spread of democracy throughout the Americas opened here Friday amid raucous anti-U.S. demonstrations and deep divisions among participating nations over the Bush administration's free-trade agenda. A group of about 200 protesters attempting to breach the security cordon around the meeting site clashed with riot police about six blocks from the hotel where President Bush and other heads of state were meeting.
NEWS
April 23, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He was chummy, wrapping his arm around the prime minister of a small Caribbean nation, sharing his limo with Mexico's chief executive and pulling Panama's small president, the only female at the gathering, into the front row for a group photo when no one could see her in the back. He was deferentially low-key, listening more often than talking.
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