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November 28, 1989 | GARR KLUENDER
Konishiki, a 490-pound Samoan-American from Hawaii, became only the second non-Japanese to win a sumo wrestling tournament Sunday in Tokyo. Konishiki, 25, stood in the ring in Fukuoka's arena and wept for joy while an official of the U.S. Embassy read a message of congratulations from President Bush. "This is like a dream," Konishiki said. The other non-Japanese winner was another Hawaiian, Takamiyama, in 1972.
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SPORTS
February 6, 2009 | Lisa Dillman
The pot scandal rocked a nation, leading to indignant editorials and raising questions about the perceived lost old-school values of the sport. No, this isn't about Olympic swim star Michael Phelps. Think Japan and sumo wrestling. Now, sumo wrestling, a good excuse to eat massive amounts of potato chips, pizza and Twinkies without suspicion. And who would possibly catch on that it might be the munchies, not a byproduct of a training regime?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1997 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the world of sumo wrestling, big is beautiful. Just ask Manny Yarbrough, who at 6 feet, 8 inches tips the scales at 700 pounds. At lunch on Friday, he sat at a table that groaned with mountains of food. Four pieces of corn sat on one plate. A heap of fried chicken graced another. A hill of rice was stacked on a platter. A basket of bread was wedged between the plates.
NEWS
April 5, 2007 | Alex Chun
Think of sumo wrestling, and you might envision two men bouncing their bellies off each other. But nothing could be further from the truth, says California Sumo Assn. director Andrew Freund. To prove his point, the association is holding its seventh annual U.S. Sumo Open this Saturday at the Los Angeles Sports Arena for those wanting a more authentic look at the ancient Japanese sport.
SPORTS
January 23, 2001 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hawaiian-born Akebono, the first foreigner anointed a grand champion in Japan's rarefied world of sumo wrestling, is hanging up his loincloth. Hobbling on bad knees, clad in a gray kimono and dabbing away tears, Akebono on Monday announced that he will retire from the clay ring, where he has spent the last dozen years winning fame and fortune.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2000
Agatpu Rodney Anoai, 34, a Hawaiian-born former sumo wrestling star who once beat Hulk Hogan to win professional wrestling's world heavyweight title. Anoai, who weighed 589 pounds and performed under the name Yokozuna, was on a WrestleMania 2000 tour of Britain when he was found dead in his hotel room. His stage name came from sumo wrestling and means "grand champion" in Japanese. The British tour promoter Brian Dixon called Anoai "a giant of a man but extremely gentle outside the ring."
NEWS
May 27, 1987 | United Press International
A 527-pound American, who broke into sumo wrestling only five years ago, shattered 1,300 years of tradition today as the first foreigner named to champion's rank in the sport of Japan's ancient emperors. "I did it," exclaimed a jubilant Salevaa Atisanoe, a native of Hawaii, as tears welled in his eyes after the Japan Sumo Assn. announced he had been promoted to ozeki , or champion, sumo's second-highest rank.
SPORTS
April 24, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese officials went to great lengths to deny a charge by an American Samoan from Hawaii that racism was blocking him from sumo wrestling's highest ranking. Koichi Kato, the government's chief spokesman, insisted that sumo promotions were based entirely on ability. "I hope officials concerned will see to it that the American people understand," Kato said. Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa was quoted by Japanese media as saying he didn't believe there was discrimination in the sumo world.
SPORTS
December 9, 1992 | MIKE DOWNEY
Some people can't stomach sumo wrestling. I guess they don't understand the appeal of two 500-pound men in Pampers bouncing their jiggly jelly belly bumpers into one another until one of them bumps the other one all the way into the thrill of victory or the upset stomach of defeat. When I went to Japan a couple of summers ago, a woman said she wanted to take me to the big sumo championships. (As opposed, I suppose, to the small sumo championships.) But I didn't want to go.
SPORTS
December 27, 2005 | From the Associated Press
Shaquille O'Neal laughed at the idea: diaper-clad men of gargantuan size summoned as battering rams to make the NBA's most imposing big man even better. Don't laugh, Shaq. It might happen. Coach Pat Riley is talking about adding extra bulk -- and he means real tonnage -- to Miami Heat practices. Riley's idea? Sumo wrestlers. "We're going to bring them in and have them lean on him and lean on him, and we're not going to let him just back them in," Riley said.
MAGAZINE
May 9, 2004 | MICHAEL T. JARVIS
Sumo wrestling may have originated in Japan 1,500 years ago, but now it's a crossover sensation. Amateurs from around the world gathered at the New Otani Hotel in Los Angeles last month to grapple for gold, silver and bronze medals at the fourth annual U.S. Sumo Open. To win a match, a wrestler must push an opponent out of the ring or make him (or her) touch the ground. No punches or kicking are allowed, but slapping and tripping are. We asked some participants to weigh in.
NEWS
January 8, 2004 | Nancy Rommelmann, Special to The Times
LARRY BRANN waits in a chair in the Jun Chong Martial Arts Center in Santa Monica, smiling as kids in tae kwon do uniforms file into class on a Sunday morning. Dressed in baggy shorts, Brann is not here to study the Korean martial art, but to take his first class in sumo wrestling, which thus far he has only seen on TV. "It's the ultimate sport," says Brann. "It's like when you were a little kid, fighting with your brother or sister to be king of the mountain; your whole job is to get them down.
NEWS
April 2, 2001 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two hulking men squatted on the balls of their feet, facing each other in the fighting ring. They rubbed their hands together to symbolize washing before battle, clapped once to alert the gods that a fight was about to begin, then opened their palms to show they had no hidden weapons. They leaned forward and touched the knuckles of both hands to the ground, just as the gyoji, or judge, gave the signal to begin.
SPORTS
January 23, 2001 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hawaiian-born Akebono, the first foreigner anointed a grand champion in Japan's rarefied world of sumo wrestling, is hanging up his loincloth. Hobbling on bad knees, clad in a gray kimono and dabbing away tears, Akebono on Monday announced that he will retire from the clay ring, where he has spent the last dozen years winning fame and fortune.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2000
Agatpu Rodney Anoai, 34, a Hawaiian-born former sumo wrestling star who once beat Hulk Hogan to win professional wrestling's world heavyweight title. Anoai, who weighed 589 pounds and performed under the name Yokozuna, was on a WrestleMania 2000 tour of Britain when he was found dead in his hotel room. His stage name came from sumo wrestling and means "grand champion" in Japanese. The British tour promoter Brian Dixon called Anoai "a giant of a man but extremely gentle outside the ring."
SPORTS
February 6, 2009 | Lisa Dillman
The pot scandal rocked a nation, leading to indignant editorials and raising questions about the perceived lost old-school values of the sport. No, this isn't about Olympic swim star Michael Phelps. Think Japan and sumo wrestling. Now, sumo wrestling, a good excuse to eat massive amounts of potato chips, pizza and Twinkies without suspicion. And who would possibly catch on that it might be the munchies, not a byproduct of a training regime?
SPORTS
December 27, 2005 | From the Associated Press
Shaquille O'Neal laughed at the idea: diaper-clad men of gargantuan size summoned as battering rams to make the NBA's most imposing big man even better. Don't laugh, Shaq. It might happen. Coach Pat Riley is talking about adding extra bulk -- and he means real tonnage -- to Miami Heat practices. Riley's idea? Sumo wrestlers. "We're going to bring them in and have them lean on him and lean on him, and we're not going to let him just back them in," Riley said.
NEWS
May 21, 1998 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Move over, Fergie. Konishiki--the biggest sumo wrestler on Earth, a man who once tipped the scales at 625 pounds and was capable of consuming 100 beers and 70 pieces of sushi in a single sitting--has retired from the sumo ring and is trying to shed 220 pounds. It is a Herculean task, one that throws the dieting woes of ordinary mortals into new perspective. But Konishiki's life story is already as oversized as his extra-long mawashi loincloth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1997 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the world of sumo wrestling, big is beautiful. Just ask Manny Yarbrough, who at 6 feet, 8 inches tips the scales at 700 pounds. At lunch on Friday, he sat at a table that groaned with mountains of food. Four pieces of corn sat on one plate. A heap of fried chicken graced another. A hill of rice was stacked on a platter. A basket of bread was wedged between the plates.
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