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BUSINESS
September 11, 1998
* Fred Meyer Inc.'s fiscal second-quarter profit rose 57% to $46.2 million, or 29 cents a share, matching estimates, as sales more than doubled to $3.5 billion. The Portland, Ore.-based retailer benefited from strong results at recently acquired chains, including Food 4 Less Holdings Inc. * * Jones Apparel Group Inc. agreed to buy Sun Apparel Inc., which holds the license for Polo Jeans Company clothing, for $444 million.
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BUSINESS
September 11, 1998
* Fred Meyer Inc.'s fiscal second-quarter profit rose 57% to $46.2 million, or 29 cents a share, matching estimates, as sales more than doubled to $3.5 billion. The Portland, Ore.-based retailer benefited from strong results at recently acquired chains, including Food 4 Less Holdings Inc. * * Jones Apparel Group Inc. agreed to buy Sun Apparel Inc., which holds the license for Polo Jeans Company clothing, for $444 million.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1998
In disputes about working conditions in a plant, who is more likely to uncover the truth--the person who tours the plant with the company or the person who meets with workers off the premises? "Garment-Textile Boom Brings Wrenching Change to Mexico" [Sept. 27] cites "Cross Border Blues," a report I wrote. The report discusses working conditions in plants in Tehuacan that produce for U.S. denim companies such as Guess, Sun Apparel Inc. and VF Corp. When our fact-finding delegation went to Tehuacan, we were unable to view inside the factories, but we did meet with workers off the premises and worked closely with the local Human Rights Commission, which is headed by a respected priest in the area.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1998 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
St. John Knits Inc.'s founders, saying they're tired of trying to satisfy Wall Street's insatiable demand for rapid growth, announced plans Tuesday to buy all the shares of the upscale clothing maker and take it private. "We wanted to slow the growth down, and Wall Street doesn't like slow growth," Chief Executive Robert E. Gray said Tuesday. "We feel the best way to do that is by being private."
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