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Sun Belt Water Inc

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BUSINESS
March 22, 1991 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mother Nature and the environment minister of British Columbia are enough to make Jack B. Lindsey sweat. Lindsey is chairman of Sun Belt Water Inc., a Santa Barbara company formed eight months ago to bring water from rain-soaked British Columbia to the parched Central Coast. But when the Goleta Water District chose Sun Belt last week to ship water south by tanker, it was the beginning of the firm's troubles, not the end.
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BUSINESS
March 22, 1991 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mother Nature and the environment minister of British Columbia are enough to make Jack B. Lindsey sweat. Lindsey is chairman of Sun Belt Water Inc., a Santa Barbara company formed eight months ago to bring water from rain-soaked British Columbia to the parched Central Coast. But when the Goleta Water District chose Sun Belt last week to ship water south by tanker, it was the beginning of the firm's troubles, not the end.
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NEWS
March 16, 1991 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With its back to the wall and the fate of a $52-million agricultural industry at stake, the Goleta Water District selected a company Friday to ship Canadian water to this thirsty Santa Barbara County coastal community by supertanker, the first time such a drastic action has been taken in the United States. But contract negotiations with the firm that was chosen and a complicated permit process still stand between Goleta and the costly water from British Columbia.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With its back to the wall and the fate of a $52-million agricultural industry at stake, the Goleta Water District selected a company Friday to ship Canadian water to this thirsty Santa Barbara County coastal community by supertanker, the first time such a drastic action has been taken in the United States. But contract negotiations with the firm that was chosen and a complicated permit process still stand between Goleta and the costly water from British Columbia.
NEWS
February 28, 1999 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The global push toward a "borderless economy," already blamed for the turmoil that has impoverished millions from Seoul to Sao Paulo, is increasingly accused of another sin: undermining the sovereignty of governments. Sweeping free-trade initiatives of the 1990s, such as NAFTA and the World Trade Organization, are coming under attack for handing foreign interests the legal firepower to undercut public policy on economic, health, safety and other issues.
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