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WORLD
August 17, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The Sun newspaper apologized for printing 3-year-old pictures of Prince Harry groping a woman in a nightclub, which it had claimed were taken this summer. It acted after a protest from Prince Charles' office.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
John Lennon got verbally crucified in 1966 for declaring that the Beatles were more popular than Jesus. Now, Noel Gallagher has topped that by asserting that God is a fan of Oasis. Noel, the former lead songwriter of the Beatles-obsessed band from Manchester, told Britain's the Sun newspaper that he already had his sales pitch ready to persuade St. Peter to open the pearly gates when he arrived in the afterlife. "I'd say, 'You've heard "Don't Look Back in Anger"?' and they'd say, 'Of course.' I'd say, 'Look, it's me, let us in. I can play you a tune.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1992
Dear L.A. Times: My name is Brittney and I'm 8 years old. I read a book about a girl named Virginia who wrote to the Sun newspaper to see if there was a Santa Claus. All my friends say that Santa Claus is just your parents leaving presents, but I don't think that they are right. Is there a Santa, or is Santa your parents? I am asking you because I know everything in the L.A. Times is true. BRITTNEY WINN City of Industry
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
This post has been updated. See note below for details. Maybe the Rolling Stones should work up Chuck Berry's “Reelin' and Rockin' ” -- the proto-rock hit in which the singer keeps checking his watch -- now that the group may be facing a fine of more than $300,000 for breaking the local curfew Sunday at their 50th anniversary gig in London. The show was scheduled to wrap at 10:30 p.m., but Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts and Ron Wood continued playing encores until 11:05 p.m., according to the Sun newspaper in London.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2008 | associated press
A London judge on Friday jailed a man who sold a newspaper footage that appeared to show Amy Winehouse taking drugs. Johnny Blagrove and his girlfriend Cara Burton admitted offering to supply drugs to the singer and other celebrities. Judge Tudor Owen ordered Blagrove, 34, jailed for two years. Burton, 22, received two years' community service. Prosecutors said the pair covertly filmed Winehouse at a party and sold the footage to the Sun newspaper for $75,000. In January the paper published the images.
NEWS
February 16, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Queen Elizabeth II accepted a front-page apology by the tabloid Sun newspaper on Monday and its offer to pay about $285,000 as punishment for publishing her annual Christmas message two days early. A statement from Buckingham Palace said the queen is prepared to drop legal proceedings she undertook when the Sun broke the embargo on her televised speech, sent out in advance so that it could be widely distributed. The queen asserted that her copyright on the speech had been breached.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
John Lennon got verbally crucified in 1966 for declaring that the Beatles were more popular than Jesus. Now, Noel Gallagher has topped that by asserting that God is a fan of Oasis. Noel, the former lead songwriter of the Beatles-obsessed band from Manchester, told Britain's the Sun newspaper that he already had his sales pitch ready to persuade St. Peter to open the pearly gates when he arrived in the afterlife. "I'd say, 'You've heard "Don't Look Back in Anger"?' and they'd say, 'Of course.' I'd say, 'Look, it's me, let us in. I can play you a tune.
NEWS
February 15, 1993 | Reuters
Britain's mass-selling Sun tabloid newspaper apologized to Queen Elizabeth on the front page today for publishing her Christmas message to the nation early. The Sun said it also planned to offer $283,200 to the Save the Children Fund, whose patron is the queen's daughter, Princess Anne. "We accept that, unintentionally, we caused you personal offense by publishing your Christmas message two days in advance. We regret that," said the Sun. "We do not believe that what we did was illegal."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
This post has been updated. See note below for details. Maybe the Rolling Stones should work up Chuck Berry's “Reelin' and Rockin' ” -- the proto-rock hit in which the singer keeps checking his watch -- now that the group may be facing a fine of more than $300,000 for breaking the local curfew Sunday at their 50th anniversary gig in London. The show was scheduled to wrap at 10:30 p.m., but Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts and Ron Wood continued playing encores until 11:05 p.m., according to the Sun newspaper in London.
NATIONAL
July 13, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The former headquarters of a supermarket tabloid in Boca Raton was declared clean of anthrax spores almost three years after it became the first target in a series of deadly attacks. "We have no viable spores" in the American Media Inc. building, said Karen Cavanagh, chief operating officer of Sabre Technical Services. The anthrax attacks by mail are still unsolved. They killed five people.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2008 | associated press
A London judge on Friday jailed a man who sold a newspaper footage that appeared to show Amy Winehouse taking drugs. Johnny Blagrove and his girlfriend Cara Burton admitted offering to supply drugs to the singer and other celebrities. Judge Tudor Owen ordered Blagrove, 34, jailed for two years. Burton, 22, received two years' community service. Prosecutors said the pair covertly filmed Winehouse at a party and sold the footage to the Sun newspaper for $75,000. In January the paper published the images.
WORLD
August 17, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The Sun newspaper apologized for printing 3-year-old pictures of Prince Harry groping a woman in a nightclub, which it had claimed were taken this summer. It acted after a protest from Prince Charles' office.
NEWS
April 20, 2006 | From The Associated Press
Britain's bestselling newspaper apologized Wednesday to "Desperate Housewives" star Teri Hatcher for a story that claimed she had sex with men in a van outside her home. The Sun tabloid acknowledged that the article, which it ran last August, was "totally incorrect" and apologized to Hatcher "for the embarrassment caused." Her legal firm, Schillings, said the newspaper had agreed to pay undisclosed damages and Hatcher's costs.
NATIONAL
July 13, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The former headquarters of a supermarket tabloid in Boca Raton was declared clean of anthrax spores almost three years after it became the first target in a series of deadly attacks. "We have no viable spores" in the American Media Inc. building, said Karen Cavanagh, chief operating officer of Sabre Technical Services. The anthrax attacks by mail are still unsolved. They killed five people.
NATIONAL
July 12, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Workers began pumping a potent chemical into the former headquarters of a supermarket tabloid to clean up what was the first target in a series of deadly anthrax attacks in 2001. Photo editor Bob Stevens of the Sun died from anthrax. Workers flowed chlorine dioxide, a chemical used to disinfect drinking water, into the American Media Inc. building in Boca Raton to kill the spores. A company founded by former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani led the cleanup and plans to occupy the space.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2004 | From Associated Press
William F. Schmick Jr., former publisher of the Sun newspapers in Baltimore, has died at age 90. Schmick died of heart failure Friday at the Blakehurst Life Care Community, a spokeswoman said. Schmick's career with the Sun, the Evening Sun and Sunday Sun spanned more than 40 years. During his tenure, the newspapers expanded advertising, circulation and features.
NATIONAL
July 12, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Workers began pumping a potent chemical into the former headquarters of a supermarket tabloid to clean up what was the first target in a series of deadly anthrax attacks in 2001. Photo editor Bob Stevens of the Sun died from anthrax. Workers flowed chlorine dioxide, a chemical used to disinfect drinking water, into the American Media Inc. building in Boca Raton to kill the spores. A company founded by former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani led the cleanup and plans to occupy the space.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1999 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newspaper magnate William Dean Singleton said Thursday he would acquire the San Bernardino Sun as part of a rapid expansion of his reach in the Southern California marketplace. Gannett Co., the Sun's owner, said it would add the 80,000-circulation daily to a partnership already formed by Donrey Media Group and Garden State Newspapers, affiliates of Singleton's privately held MediaNews Group.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1999 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newspaper magnate William Dean Singleton said Thursday he would acquire the San Bernardino Sun as part of a rapid expansion of his reach in the Southern California marketplace. Gannett Co., the Sun's owner, said it would add the 80,000-circulation daily to a partnership already formed by Donrey Media Group and Garden State Newspapers, affiliates of Singleton's privately held MediaNews Group.
BUSINESS
February 22, 1994 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rupert Murdoch, a man always full of surprises, has stunned British media circles with the appointment of Fleet Street's wildest--and perhaps most successful--editor to run the BSkyB satellite television service. Taking over the $2-billion multichannel operation without benefit of any previous TV experience is Kelvin MacKenzie, 47-year-old editor of Murdoch's tabloid, the Sun--the biggest daily in Britain with a circulation averaging 3.7 million and home of the Page 3 Girl.
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