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NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Susan Denley
The Guise Archives Eyewear Co. is introducing Pasadena-designed, Italian-made Tavat Eyewear with a special price of  $100 off on Sunday.  The collection features “Melanin” lenses to protect eyes from the sun, plus a number of other technological features. Tavat's design team was led by the renowned late professor Norman Schureman of the Art Center School of Design in Pasadena. Guise is at 7928 Melrose Ave., Los Angeles. For store hours, call (323) 782-1093 or check the store's Facebook page for daily updates.
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NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Susan Denley
The Guise Archives Eyewear Co. is introducing Pasadena-designed, Italian-made Tavat Eyewear with a special price of  $100 off on Sunday.  The collection features “Melanin” lenses to protect eyes from the sun, plus a number of other technological features. Tavat's design team was led by the renowned late professor Norman Schureman of the Art Center School of Design in Pasadena. Guise is at 7928 Melrose Ave., Los Angeles. For store hours, call (323) 782-1093 or check the store's Facebook page for daily updates.
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HEALTH
July 5, 1999
* Use a sunscreen if you are going to be out for more than 20 minutes. * Know your skin type. Fair-skinned people will burn more quickly than darker-skinned people using the same sunscreen. * If you are fair-skinned, use sunscreens of SPF 15 or higher. * Use sunscreens with both UVA and UVB protection. * Apply sunscreen at least 15 minutes before going outside. * Apply at least 1 ounce of sunscreen to your body, covering all exposed skin.
IMAGE
July 15, 2012 | By Kavita Daswani
Which BB cream is right for you? Here is a sampling of some products on the market or soon to be. Garnier Miracle Skin Perfector BB cream has vitamin C, tinted minerals and hyaluronic acid and comes in light-medium and medium-dark. It costs $12.99 at mass market retailers. Sulwhasoo Snowise brightening cream is originally from S. Korea and launched in the U.S. this year. It contains 10 minerals and pigments, including white ginseng polysaccharides to help with brightening.
HEALTH
October 15, 2001 | Shari Roan
California schoolchildren just received a bit more sun protection. Gov. Gray Davis last week signed a bill, SB 310, requiring schools to allow children to wear sun-protective clothing, including certain styles of hats, outdoors. Hats had been banned to discourage affiliation with gangs. California has the highest incidence of melanoma diagnoses and deaths in the country. Studies have linked development of the skin disease to sunburn in childhood. The bill will go into effect Jan. 1.
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | VALLI HERMAN-COHEN, TIMES SENIOR FASHION WRITER
In Southern California, sunscreen products rank in importance with sunglasses and air-conditioning. Despite many attempts, the perfect sunscreen has yet to be made. (They're all stinky or sticky.) But some companies are moving in the right direction. Ferragamo's new summer scent collection includes a perfumed body mist with an SPF of 6. What may be the world's first scent with a sunscreen presents some intriguing options.
MAGAZINE
January 15, 1989 | PADDY CALISTRO
WHILE sunscreen makers race to put the highest sun-protection-factor numbers on product labels, some dermatologists are warning that numbers over SPF 15 may represent little more than a marketing ploy. Yet, other doctors encourage patients to use products with high SPF numbers. Why the controversy? Dr. Arnold Klein, assistant clinical professor of dermatology at UCLA School of Medicine, says that labeling products with an SPF greater than 15 may be misleading.
MAGAZINE
May 24, 1987 | PADDY CALISTRO
The days when barefoot boys and girls with cheeks of tan spent their summers in the sunshine may quickly be coming to an end. Dermatologists and pediatricians now suggest that protecting children from the sun's harmful rays may be a matter of life and death. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation in New York City, one out of every 100 children will, as an adult, develop skin cancer directly related to childhood sun exposure.
HEALTH
June 1, 2009 | Chris Woolston
Have you ever slathered on sunscreen but somehow managed to miss your nose? Or the back of your hand? Or the tops of your feet? You're not the only one. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, most people apply less than half of the optimal amount of sunscreen, a habit that adds up to a lot of burned patches and uncomfortable rides home from the beach.
HEALTH
August 30, 2004 | Hilary E. MacGregor, Times Staff Writer
That first summer, most new moms and dads wrap their newborns in long-sleeved jerseys, shelter their faces from the sun with wide-brimmed hats and keep them in the shade. The second summer, though, parents slack off, and children get less sun protection and more burns.
HEALTH
June 30, 2012
The effectiveness standard most of us associate with sunscreens - the SPF, or sun protection factor - measures only how well they block UVB rays. That's because scientists used to believe UVB rays acted alone in causing skin cancer. UVB rays cause sunburn. So to measure how well a sunscreen blocks UVB rays, testers actually observe a group of people wearing the screen and a group not wearing it and time how long they can be in the sun before they start to turn red. The SPF rating is the ratio of the first group's average time compared with the second group's.
IMAGE
May 27, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
The beginning of summer always seems to be accompanied by an onslaught of sunscreens. The market is crowded with lotions and sprays, powders and lip balms, and, increasingly, multi-tasking products with inventive application methods that are touted for their ability to do more than just block the UVA and UVB rays that lead to sunburns, skin cancer and premature aging of the skin. Indeed, many of the season's new sun care products were designed to marry broad-spectrum sun protection with anti-aging compounds, moisturizers, makeup - even self tanners.
NEWS
January 23, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Sunscreens should be used regularly by people of all ages to prevent skin cancer, including the most dangerous form of cancer linked to sunburns: melanoma. However, a new study shows that kids are really bad about using sunscreen consistently. Researchers studied fifth-grade children in Massachusetts in 2004 and then re-surveyed the same 360 children three years later. In the first survey, more than half of the kids said they had experienced at least one sunburn, and this rate did not change three years later.
IMAGE
June 27, 2010 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Something strange is happening in the sunscreen aisle. Shelves that had been stocked with bottles claiming an SPF, or a sun protection factor, of 30 now trumpet SPFs of 55, 70, even "110+." This not-so-subtle escalation often comes with corollary pricing. Higher SPFs frequently cost more, but are they worth it? Many dermatologists don't think so. "Once you get to SPF 50, it's really getting silly," said Boston dermatologist, James Spencer. "SPF refers to multiples of how much longer it takes the skin to burn," but it isn't a linear progression.
HEALTH
September 28, 2009 | Lynn Rosenberg
Many people who don't protect themselves from the sun may never get skin cancer. And certainly, you can roll the dice if you wish. But there are things I now do regularly to protect myself from it. I don't have to remember to do them; they're automatic. I was never this careful before my husband died of the disease. That tragedy was my motivator. But maybe I could be your motivator -- if you know a little bit about what my husband, Jerry, went through and what I went through as his wife.
HEALTH
June 1, 2009 | Chris Woolston
Have you ever slathered on sunscreen but somehow managed to miss your nose? Or the back of your hand? Or the tops of your feet? You're not the only one. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, most people apply less than half of the optimal amount of sunscreen, a habit that adds up to a lot of burned patches and uncomfortable rides home from the beach.
MAGAZINE
April 4, 1993 | BARBARA FOLEY
The ozone layer being what it isn't, sun exposure dictates certain necessities. Like sunscreen. When sun hits skin, it produces melanin, a natural shield against ultraviolet radiation. Problems arise when there is less melanin than sun, UV and pollutant penetration: Sunburn. Skin damage. The face of an iguana. But no longer are suntan lotions your sole protection. Sun protection factor, or SPF, is now built into everything from foundations to lipsticks to hair lotion.
NEWS
July 22, 1989 | JULIE LOGAN and DR. DAVID C. RISH, Dr. David C. Rish is a clinical professor of dermatology at UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles.
The description healthy tan is a contradiction in terms. Once you understand the sun's effects on your skin, you won't envy all those bronzed bodies you see. Unprotected skin dries out, thickens and changes to a leathery texture. Aging begins on the surface of your skin and penetrates deeper, to cause fine lines, wrinkles, age spots and dilated blood vessels. These changes, called photoaging, are caused by the sun over a period of time.
HEALTH
May 28, 2007 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
CONSTANT worrying about the sun and its power to burn, wrinkle and mottle the skin -- or worse, cause cancer -- comes with the summer territory. But what if there were an extra level of protection, say a pill or a lotion, that helped prevent the most common effects of too much ultraviolet light? Researchers are working on it. "Sunscreens are difficult to use properly," says Daniel Yarosh, president of AGI Dermatics, a Freeport, N.Y.
HOME & GARDEN
September 9, 2004 | Lili Singer, Special to The Times
So what do you wear when you garden? Most likely it's your grubbiest duds, loose clothes that offer freedom of movement but little defense. Yes, comfort is crucial, but safety is smart. From head to toe, the well-dressed gardener takes precautions before setting out. Indeed, sartorial splendor amidst the salvias is possible. Today's most innovative garden clothing is truly chic, in lively colors and designs for women, men and children.
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