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Sun Protection Factor

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NEWS
May 29, 1992 | CINDY LaFAVRE YORKS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Drug store and department store makeup counters are full of cosmetics that contain sunscreen. But women who start their makeup ritual with a layer of pure sunscreen don't really need the extra amounts included in other cosmetics. In fact, some skin experts believe the layering of plain sunscreen, sunscreen-infused moisturizers, or sunscreen-enhanced foundations compromises total sun protection. "These products are an automatic protection for women who would otherwise not wear any," says Dr.
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NEWS
June 15, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
The Food and Drug Administration issued new guidelines Tuesday for sunscreen labeling that will give consumers better information about the products' effectiveness and that will, for the first time, allow the bottles, tubes and sprays to say that sunscreens protect against skin cancer and early skin aging. The agency has been considering such regulations since 1978 and released some proposed rules in 2007, but subsequently concluded that the labeling system under consideration would be too confusing for consumers.
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HEALTH
June 1, 2009 | Chris Woolston
Have you ever slathered on sunscreen but somehow managed to miss your nose? Or the back of your hand? Or the tops of your feet? You're not the only one. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, most people apply less than half of the optimal amount of sunscreen, a habit that adds up to a lot of burned patches and uncomfortable rides home from the beach.
HEALTH
June 1, 2009 | Chris Woolston
Have you ever slathered on sunscreen but somehow managed to miss your nose? Or the back of your hand? Or the tops of your feet? You're not the only one. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, most people apply less than half of the optimal amount of sunscreen, a habit that adds up to a lot of burned patches and uncomfortable rides home from the beach.
MAGAZINE
April 4, 1993 | BARBARA FOLEY
The ozone layer being what it isn't, sun exposure dictates certain necessities. Like sunscreen. When sun hits skin, it produces melanin, a natural shield against ultraviolet radiation. Problems arise when there is less melanin than sun, UV and pollutant penetration: Sunburn. Skin damage. The face of an iguana. But no longer are suntan lotions your sole protection. Sun protection factor, or SPF, is now built into everything from foundations to lipsticks to hair lotion.
MAGAZINE
June 2, 1991 | CINDY LAFAVRE YORKS
Too much sun can be as bad for hair as it is for skin, especially hair that's been chemically treated. But never fear. Several hair-care products now contain sunscreen and use the sun's heat to condition while protecting. One of the newest is Mastey Solfiltre Hair Sunscreen, available at Jadss International Hair Salon and Academy in Los Angeles and Danielle Coiffure in Beverly Hills.
NEWS
July 7, 1992 | AMERICAN HEALTH MAGAZINE
The daunting headlines keep coming: Melanoma, the deadly skin cancer, is now the eighth most common cancer--up from 20th just 10 years ago. Today protection has replaced tanning as the buzzword in sun products. "Everyone should use a sunscreen with an SPF (sun protection factor) of at least 15--that's just for brief daily exposure, such as walking to work or driving a car," says Dr. Nicholas Lowe, a clinical professor of dermatology at UCLA.
NEWS
May 7, 1991 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
When youth-conscious folks began slathering Retin-A on their faces a few years back, skeptics smirked that the Vitamin A derivative could not arrest aging. But the critics didn't laugh long. Next up? Vitamin C may earn its place in the sun, too. Applied to the skin, Vitamin C protects against sunburn, Duke University researchers reported last week at the Society for Investigative Dermatology meeting in Seattle.
NEWS
April 15, 1986 | BOB SIPCHEN
In the past 10 years, dozens of new sunscreens and tan-promoting products have been battling for shelf space in supermarkets and pharmacies. According to Charles H. Kline & Co. Inc., a New York market research and consulting firm, retail sales for three categories of products--tanning products, quick tan and after-sun-exposure products, and sunscreens and sunblocks--were about $350 million last year. (Other industry estimates put the figure around $200 million.
TRAVEL
May 21, 1989 | DR. KARL NEUMANN, Neumann is a Forest Hills, N.Y., pediatrician who writes on travel-related matters
When packing for a cruise in the tropics, don't just pack for fashion. Pack for protection. The sun can do damage to skin unaccustomed to too much of it. This is especially important in late winter and early spring when protective tans from the previous summer are gone. Then, even half an hour of morning or late-afternoon sun can result in a burn. Sunburn is the most common condition treated by ships' physicians. This is because on a cruise, a good portion of time spent in the sun is spent near the water.
NEWS
July 14, 2000 | MARIAN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sun may be 94 million miles from Earth, but that great ball of fire is sparking a fashion trend. Sun-safe clothes--including cute jumpsuits for kids, surfer wear for teens and beach cover-ups for grown-ups--are finally coming out of the shadow of their drab image. Talk about sunny delight: functional and fashionable clothes for close encounters with the sun.
HEALTH
July 5, 1999
A new national survey concludes that many Americans are poorly informed about sun protection issues. The poll by Discovery Health Media, a Bethesda, Md.-based media company, found that two out of three Americans recognized the high mortality rate associated with skin cancer, but a large majority remain misinformed about how to protect themselves and their families.
HEALTH
July 5, 1999 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
The year was 1978, and Americans were basking and bronzing in the sun like never before. Solar reflectors and tanning solutions promising "fast-acting" results were popular with sunbathers in search of the "healthy tan." And fashion models such as Farrah Fawcett sported a bronzed ideal of beauty. But not everyone was a fan of tans.
HEALTH
May 18, 1998 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Protecting the skin from ultraviolet exposure during outdoor workouts is crucial to reducing skin cancer risk. Fortunately, there are more and more options for covering up. A Little Ventilation, Please Meant to be worn while running, climbing or walking, Solumbra Ventilated Sport Pants from Sun Precautions in Everett, Wash., are made of a fabric that provides an SPF (sun protection factor) of 30-plus.
MAGAZINE
April 4, 1993 | BARBARA FOLEY
The ozone layer being what it isn't, sun exposure dictates certain necessities. Like sunscreen. When sun hits skin, it produces melanin, a natural shield against ultraviolet radiation. Problems arise when there is less melanin than sun, UV and pollutant penetration: Sunburn. Skin damage. The face of an iguana. But no longer are suntan lotions your sole protection. Sun protection factor, or SPF, is now built into everything from foundations to lipsticks to hair lotion.
NEWS
July 7, 1992 | AMERICAN HEALTH MAGAZINE
The daunting headlines keep coming: Melanoma, the deadly skin cancer, is now the eighth most common cancer--up from 20th just 10 years ago. Today protection has replaced tanning as the buzzword in sun products. "Everyone should use a sunscreen with an SPF (sun protection factor) of at least 15--that's just for brief daily exposure, such as walking to work or driving a car," says Dr. Nicholas Lowe, a clinical professor of dermatology at UCLA.
MAGAZINE
July 31, 1988 | PADDY CALISTRO
ONE CONSISTENT message keeps coming through at beauty counters: Sun protection should not be limited to the beach or the ski slopes. Cosmetics manufacturers are making it easier to follow the advice of dermatologists and skin-cancer researchers who have said for years that the way to prevent damage from sun exposure is to use a sunscreen every day, all year--especially in Southern California.
HEALTH
May 18, 1998 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Protecting the skin from ultraviolet exposure during outdoor workouts is crucial to reducing skin cancer risk. Fortunately, there are more and more options for covering up. A Little Ventilation, Please Meant to be worn while running, climbing or walking, Solumbra Ventilated Sport Pants from Sun Precautions in Everett, Wash., are made of a fabric that provides an SPF (sun protection factor) of 30-plus.
NEWS
June 26, 1992
When Sean Hosmer, 22, began working as a lifeguard at Rocky Neck State Park in East Lyme, Conn., four years ago, the solar social standards were quite different. "When I first started, there was this big race to get a tan," he says. "Now people are more careful." Even so, the Rocky Neck lifeguards are not exactly skin-protection experts.
NEWS
May 29, 1992 | CINDY LaFAVRE YORKS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Drug store and department store makeup counters are full of cosmetics that contain sunscreen. But women who start their makeup ritual with a layer of pure sunscreen don't really need the extra amounts included in other cosmetics. In fact, some skin experts believe the layering of plain sunscreen, sunscreen-infused moisturizers, or sunscreen-enhanced foundations compromises total sun protection. "These products are an automatic protection for women who would otherwise not wear any," says Dr.
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