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January 18, 1998 | Associated Press
Cambodian troops engaged in fierce battles with rebels in that country's northern jungle Saturday in some of the most intense fighting in recent weeks, a Thai officer said. Three Thai soldiers were wounded in the clashes when shells strayed across the border, the senior Thai officer said. Thai troops returned fire. The officer, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said fighting around the resistance base of O'Smach over the last three days has been the heaviest since December.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Little girls in glittery red outfits, shaking their tambourines to the beat of Chinese music, ushered in the Year of the Rabbit at John A. Sutter Junior High School on Saturday morning. "This will be a big year. The rabbit will deliver the new century," said Candy Lee, a parent and the master of ceremonies. "So it's a big celebration." Following a lunar calendar, the Year of the Rabbit arrives every 12 years. This year, Chinese New Year begins at sunset Feb. 16.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Little girls in glittery red outfits, shaking their tambourines to the beat of Chinese music, ushered in the Year of the Rabbit at John A. Sutter Junior High School on Saturday morning. "This will be a big year. The rabbit will deliver the new century," said Candy Lee, a parent and the master of ceremonies. "So it's a big celebration." Following a lunar calendar, the Year of the Rabbit arrives every 12 years. This year, Chinese New Year begins at sunset Feb. 16.
NEWS
January 18, 1998 | Associated Press
Cambodian troops engaged in fierce battles with rebels in that country's northern jungle Saturday in some of the most intense fighting in recent weeks, a Thai officer said. Three Thai soldiers were wounded in the clashes when shells strayed across the border, the senior Thai officer said. Thai troops returned fire. The officer, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said fighting around the resistance base of O'Smach over the last three days has been the heaviest since December.
NEWS
June 12, 1990 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here along the coast of South China, one can feel the looming presence of a great power struggling to be born. It is a commercial and military giant that would have the population, natural resources, nuclear weapons and scientific talent of China, the trading skills and financial prowess of Hong Kong, the capital reserves and manufacturing techniques of Taiwan.
NEWS
January 5, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A senior Chinese official will visit Taiwan later this month, a newspaper reported, in the clearest sign yet that Beijing is planning to resume talks with Taipei. Yang Xiaoming, a deputy secretary of Beijing's semiofficial Assn. for Relations Across the Taiwan Strait, will accompany a delegation to Taiwan at mid-month, Taiwan's China Times Express said.
NEWS
November 13, 1986
China's Communist government observed the 120th anniversary of revolutionary Sun Yat-sen's birthday by denouncing Taiwan's independence and appealing to the island's Nationalist leaders to open talks on reunification. A rally attended by about 10,000 people at the Great Hall of the People in Peking marked the birth of Sun, revered on both the mainland and on Taiwan as the leader of the 1911 revolution that overthrew China's last emperor.
TRAVEL
September 19, 1993
The story on Vancouver, B.C. ("Western Canada's Crossroads of Pacific Culture," Sept. 5), didn't begin to list its charms: convenient public transportation . . . the Dr. Sun Yat-sen Classical Chinese Garden . . . trendy Robson Street, delicious pastries at Murchie's and the Bon Ton . . . (But) it's the people that make Vancouver so wonderful . . . Example: the light-rail system has no motormen and no guards, yet there's no graffiti or vandalism . . . At Queen Elizabeth Park I saw families of all ethnicities enjoying the park and leaving no litter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1998 | DARRELL SATZMAN
The Sun Yat Sen Chinese Institute will hold a dual celebration Saturday to mark the language and cultural center's 15th anniversary and usher in the Year of the Tiger. The new year celebration will include Chinese folk dances, songs and plays--all performed by children who study Mandarin and Cantonese at the center's Saturday classes, said Principal Lena Lee. "They are not professionals but they have been practicing for two months to show their culture through these performances," she said.
NEWS
January 10, 2000 | From Associated Press
A Chinese hospital is selling liver transplants using the organs of executed prisoners, a Hong Kong newspaper reported Sunday, fueling allegations that China profits from its frequent use of the death penalty. Sun Yat-sen University of Medical Sciences No. 1 Hospital is charging $38,500 per transplant, the South China Morning Post said. It said more than 40 patients from China, Malaysia and Thailand have received transplants.
NEWS
June 12, 1990 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here along the coast of South China, one can feel the looming presence of a great power struggling to be born. It is a commercial and military giant that would have the population, natural resources, nuclear weapons and scientific talent of China, the trading skills and financial prowess of Hong Kong, the capital reserves and manufacturing techniques of Taiwan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1997
It is Jim Mann's expectation (International Outlook, Nov. 19) of the release of China's top dissident that "it will be Wei Jingsheng's task to make sure he does not fall into the comfortable irrelevance of the exiles who preceded him. The betting here is that Wei can meet the challenge." I will put the betting on the opposite side. Wei has the perfect idea of democracy for China, but I am afraid he is on the wrong side of Chinese history. As stated by Mann, "The Chinese dissidents who have come here . . . have had trouble attracting a following even among overseas Chinese, much less in China itself."
HOME & GARDEN
October 30, 2003 | David Pierson, Times Staff Writer
Zhou DE ZHAO, an expert appraiser of Chinese antiquities, looked at the old scroll and what he saw astounded him. He had been called to San Francisco by a man whose father had died recently and left behind some artwork. This particular piece, the man hoped, would fetch about $10,000.
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