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Sun Tzu

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NEWS
February 18, 1991 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A general who long ago led troops with brass-tipped spears and rhinoceros-hide shields is today helping guide the high-tech missile and tank warfare in the Persian Gulf. He is Sun Tzu, a shadowy figure of 6th-Century BC China who preached a military philosophy of subtlety and cunning in a tiny book called "The Art of War." Long a revered text in Asian military academies, the volume of aphorisms has stirred new interest among the U.S.
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SPORTS
October 24, 2012 | By Chris Foster
There is "The Art of War" and the art of coach-speak. UCLA Coach Jim Mora quoted one and strayed from the other just a bit on Wednesday. With the Bruins preparing for Saturday's game at Arizona State, Mora said that he briefly talked to players about opportunities. "This is a big one for us," Mora said. "This is a big one for Arizona State. I think it has a lot of ramifications down the road. " UCLA sits one game behind Arizona State and USC in the Pac-12 Conference South Division standings.
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NEWS
November 23, 1989 | DAN SEWELL, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Move over, Machiavelli. The current bible of play-to-win strategists is no longer that 16th-Century Italian author's "The Prince," but the much older writings of the Chinese military tactician Sun Tzu, assembled as "The Art of War." Sun Tzu's writings finally reached the Western world in the late 18th Century and were reputedly followed by the Soviet Red Army, the Japanese military, Vietnamese guerrilla leader Ho Chi Minh and Chinese revolutionary leader Mao Tse-tung.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2012
Art of War A Graphic Novel Kelly Roman & Michael DeWeese Harper Perennial, $22.99 For 2,000 years, Sun Tzu's "The Art of War" has dispensed battlefield strategy and tactics. And in Kelly Roman and Michael DeWeese's graphic novel, Sun Tzu is alive and well, living as a powerful kingpin in a world in whichChina'sdomination is supreme. A soldier named Kelly, released from prison (where he was sent for a friendly fire incident), wants to know who murdered his brother.
BOOKS
June 9, 1996 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
THE LOST ART OF WAR: The Recently Discovered Companion to the Best-Selling "The Art of War" by Sun Tzu II, translated and with commentary by Thomas Cleary (HarperCollins: $17; 160 pp.). "The Lost Art of War," written by the military strategist Sun Tzu II on bamboo strips and discovered in 1972 in an ancient Chinese tomb, goes into greater and more practical depth than its predecessor, "The Art of War," which was written by Sun Tzu during China's Warring States Era.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | HARRY G. SUMMERS Jr.
So, Saddam Hussein announces that his troops are withdrawing from Kuwait. But he claims victory. He doesn't announce a surrender. His forces continue to fight and attempt to hold onto their equipment. The question is: What is Saddam Hussein up to? The answers lie in the philosophies of war. But knowing just which philosophy sometimes is not an easy matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2011 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The sweep of history and the swoop of moviemaking meet in "The Warring States," an epic yet epically generic Chinese battle saga set during the titular era, a BC time of legendary infighting in the Zhou dynasty. Director Shen Jian's movie concerns the ever-skirmishing Qi and Wei states, and a complicated relationship between real-life military strategists Sun Bin (Honglei Sun) and Pang Juan (Francis Ng). Sun, played by Honglei with a mix of wise-man stoicism and comic-relief haplessness, avoids side-taking until he falls for a beautiful Qi warrior princess (Jing Tian)
SPORTS
September 18, 1997 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has already won a national championship and six conference titles, whipped Tennessee four consecutive years and raised the hackles of his coaching brethren--but the worst may yet to come for opponents of Florida Coach Steve Spurrier. Spurrier, at 52, has discovered Sun Tzu, the 4th-century BC Chinese warrior-philosopher whose seminal work, "The Art of War," has been dissected by generals real (U.S. Army's George S. Patton) and imagined (Indiana's Robert Montgomery Knight).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1991
I first learned of the Iraqi war on Jan. 16 while watching CNN. Since that time I have watched the majority of the different briefings (Centcom, Pentagon, Saudi, etc.), and I have come to the conclusion that most of the reporters at these briefings do not understand or choose to ignore the realities of war. Francis Bacon said, "Knowledge itself is power." This is particularly true during times of war. The persistent questions asked the various briefing officers demonstrate an abysmal lack of the basic fundamentals of warfare.
WORLD
May 31, 2002 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legions of followers swear by his advice. His disciples include CEOs, celebrity agents, sports coaches and TV mob boss Tony Soprano. Hollywood has turned his how-to book into a movie, and fans on the Internet parse his every word. Deepak Chopra? L. Ron Hubbard? Try Sun Tzu, an ancient Chinese military strategist who's been dead for 2,400 years. Sun was the author of "The Art of War," a basic but canny guide to outwitting and conquering the enemy in battle.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2011 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The sweep of history and the swoop of moviemaking meet in "The Warring States," an epic yet epically generic Chinese battle saga set during the titular era, a BC time of legendary infighting in the Zhou dynasty. Director Shen Jian's movie concerns the ever-skirmishing Qi and Wei states, and a complicated relationship between real-life military strategists Sun Bin (Honglei Sun) and Pang Juan (Francis Ng). Sun, played by Honglei with a mix of wise-man stoicism and comic-relief haplessness, avoids side-taking until he falls for a beautiful Qi warrior princess (Jing Tian)
NEWS
April 4, 2003 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
For weeks now, 21st century implements of war have been rolling, soaring and sailing across the sand, sky and sea in and around Iraq. But as U.S. troops mass around Baghdad, the conflict increasingly suggests something downright medieval: a city under siege. And history is full of sieges with surprise endings. Traditionally, a siege is the military blockade of a city or another fortified place, with the goal of prevailing by force or attrition.
WORLD
May 31, 2002 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legions of followers swear by his advice. His disciples include CEOs, celebrity agents, sports coaches and TV mob boss Tony Soprano. Hollywood has turned his how-to book into a movie, and fans on the Internet parse his every word. Deepak Chopra? L. Ron Hubbard? Try Sun Tzu, an ancient Chinese military strategist who's been dead for 2,400 years. Sun was the author of "The Art of War," a basic but canny guide to outwitting and conquering the enemy in battle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1999 | JAMES P. PINKERTON, James P. Pinkerton is a lecturer at the Graduate School of Political Management at George Washington University. E-mail: pinkerto@ix.netcom.com
Sometimes the best way to win is to lose. Or, more precisely, a defeat now can lead to victory later. And so it is for conservatives: Tactical sacrifice--a political martyrdom, ceding ground on an issue--can lead to strategic victory. Consider the wiretap indictment of Linda Tripp. For Vast Right Wing Conspirators, it's outrageous that the one truth-teller amid all the Lewinsky Liars is the only one facing criminal liability. That's the bad news now. But there could be good news later.
SPORTS
September 18, 1997 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has already won a national championship and six conference titles, whipped Tennessee four consecutive years and raised the hackles of his coaching brethren--but the worst may yet to come for opponents of Florida Coach Steve Spurrier. Spurrier, at 52, has discovered Sun Tzu, the 4th-century BC Chinese warrior-philosopher whose seminal work, "The Art of War," has been dissected by generals real (U.S. Army's George S. Patton) and imagined (Indiana's Robert Montgomery Knight).
BOOKS
June 9, 1996 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
THE LOST ART OF WAR: The Recently Discovered Companion to the Best-Selling "The Art of War" by Sun Tzu II, translated and with commentary by Thomas Cleary (HarperCollins: $17; 160 pp.). "The Lost Art of War," written by the military strategist Sun Tzu II on bamboo strips and discovered in 1972 in an ancient Chinese tomb, goes into greater and more practical depth than its predecessor, "The Art of War," which was written by Sun Tzu during China's Warring States Era.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2012
Art of War A Graphic Novel Kelly Roman & Michael DeWeese Harper Perennial, $22.99 For 2,000 years, Sun Tzu's "The Art of War" has dispensed battlefield strategy and tactics. And in Kelly Roman and Michael DeWeese's graphic novel, Sun Tzu is alive and well, living as a powerful kingpin in a world in whichChina'sdomination is supreme. A soldier named Kelly, released from prison (where he was sent for a friendly fire incident), wants to know who murdered his brother.
NEWS
December 6, 1987 | MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writer
In 1934, two Columbia University business professors, Benjamin Graham and David L. Dodd, published a textbook called "Security Analysis"--a deceptively simple title for a book that many still regard as the bible of the investment community. Since then, the book, a guide to scrutinizing corporate finances, has sold more than 750,000 copies. Soon after the Oct. 19 market plunge, publisher McGraw-Hill came out with its fifth edition, updated by three other authors.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | HARRY G. SUMMERS Jr.
So, Saddam Hussein announces that his troops are withdrawing from Kuwait. But he claims victory. He doesn't announce a surrender. His forces continue to fight and attempt to hold onto their equipment. The question is: What is Saddam Hussein up to? The answers lie in the philosophies of war. But knowing just which philosophy sometimes is not an easy matter.
NEWS
February 18, 1991 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A general who long ago led troops with brass-tipped spears and rhinoceros-hide shields is today helping guide the high-tech missile and tank warfare in the Persian Gulf. He is Sun Tzu, a shadowy figure of 6th-Century BC China who preached a military philosophy of subtlety and cunning in a tiny book called "The Art of War." Long a revered text in Asian military academies, the volume of aphorisms has stirred new interest among the U.S.
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