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Sun Valley Ca Development And Redevelopment

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2000 | CHIP JACOBS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just another hard-hat Monday on Strathern Street. Scrap-yard machines moan into the dreary haze. A big rig jettisons debris into a giant pit filled with concrete skeletons of old buildings. Across the way, close to a methane plant, a young man in Bermuda shorts whacks golf balls onto a driving range built directly over a closed dump. Golf? In Sun Valley? A place known for its teeming array of landfills, sand-and-gravel excavators, recycling shops and auto junkyards? Swing away.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing cost and safety concerns, City Council President Ruth Galanter has tied up consideration of a San Fernando Valley site for a new high school that could yield sorely needed classrooms for 900 by next year. Galanter said she will not allow the $50-million sale of the city's Anthony Office Building in Sun Valley to the Los Angeles Unified School District until her questions are answered. The building is currently owned by the Department of Water and Power.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles school officials warned Thursday that the Department of Water and Power site proposed by state Sen. Richard Alarcon for a high school in the northeast Valley raises serious safety concerns, including the possibility of flooding and toxicity, besides not being centrally located to serve the burgeoning student population.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting after failed talks with a local labor union chief, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power announced Friday that it will reopen bidding for a power plant in Sun Valley, delaying construction for at least six months. Brian D'Arcy, head of the union representing 5,500 electrical workers, plumbers and other city employees, challenged the award of the $238-million contract to a nonunion builder. The plant was scheduled to be completed in May 2003.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting after failed talks with a local labor union chief, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power announced Friday that it will reopen bidding for a power plant in Sun Valley, delaying construction for at least six months. Brian D'Arcy, head of the union representing 5,500 electrical workers, plumbers and other city employees, challenged the award of the $238-million contract to a nonunion builder. The plant was scheduled to be completed in May 2003.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1996
Standing beside railroad tracks with a shovel in hand, Mayor Richard Riordan broke ground Thursday to start the Los Angeles Neighborhood Initiative. The program, also known as LANI, aims to improve Sun Valley's image by renewing the neighborhood's landscape with trees, colorful bus kiosks, better street lighting and bright banners displaying the new Sun Valley logo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1995 | TIM MAY
Residents who have waited nearly four years for renovation of the swimming pool at the Sun Valley Recreation Center learned Thursday that they must wait a little longer: A ceremonial groundbreaking for the pool's refurbishing was canceled because of rain. Officials said they have not yet rescheduled the event. The 66-year-old pool was closed in the summer of 1991 because of safety concerns, but will receive a $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1993 | ED BOND
Members of the fledgling Sun Valley Community Venture Council are hopeful that their mission will be aided by the new Los Angeles City Council. Richard Alarcon, a native of Sun Valley, has taken the 7th District City Council seat, and Alarcon was one of the founders of the Venture Council. "We're not going to try to manipulate or control," said the Rev. Christopher Myvett Lindstrom. "We're trying to foster growth and potential for Sun Valley."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1995 | TIM MAY
Sun Valley commuters could soon benefit from transportation improvements ranging from new bus stop shelters and street lighting to enhanced landscaping, repaved roads and cleaner sidewalks. "And that's just for starters," said local Postmaster Jon Eshbach, who was appointed in June by Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alarcon to head a committee charged with planning beautification and other improvements related to Sun Valley's sagging transportation infrastructure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1994 | TIM MAY
Most people don't stop--or even think about stopping--when passing through Sun Valley, residents say. That's probably because they're zooming through Sun Valley at about 65 m.p.h. on the Hollywood or Golden State freeways, which meet in the middle of the community of 41,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting after failed talks with a local labor union chief, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power announced Friday it will reopen bidding for a huge new power plant in Sun Valley, delaying construction for at least six months. Brian D'Arcy, head of the union representing 5,500 electrical workers, plumbers and other city employees, challenged the award of the $238-million contract to a nonunion builder. The plant was scheduled to be completed in May 2003.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2000 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Objecting that the city may be getting the short end of the stick, Councilman Alex Padilla on Wednesday criticized a redevelopment proposal for a former landfill in the northeast Valley and asked the city Planning Commission to block the deal. The controversy centers on a 14-acre plot, part of the old Branford landfill and a former gravel mine, that city officials hope to resurrect as an industrial park for high-tech companies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2000 | CHIP JACOBS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just another hard-hat Monday on Strathern Street in Sun Valley. Scrap-yard machines moan in the dreary haze. A big rig jettisons debris into a giant pit filled with concrete skeletons of old buildings. Across the way, close to a methane plant, a young man in Bermuda shorts whacks golf balls on a driving range built directly over a closed dump. Wait. Golf?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2000 | CHIP JACOBS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just another hard-hat Monday on Strathern Street. Scrap-yard machines moan into the dreary haze. A big rig jettisons debris into a giant pit filled with concrete skeletons of old buildings. Across the way, close to a methane plant, a young man in Bermuda shorts whacks golf balls onto a driving range built directly over a closed dump. Golf? In Sun Valley? A place known for its teeming array of landfills, sand-and-gravel excavators, recycling shops and auto junkyards? Swing away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after the Los Angeles City Council took the first step to create a redevelopment area encompassing 6,835 acres of the northeast San Fernando Valley, the proposal has bogged down, sharply dividing a citizens panel. The plan for the city's largest redevelopment area is more than a year behind schedule, and the group of local residents and merchants the council formed to offer advice appears deadlocked over whether the plan should go forward.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles school officials warned Thursday that the Department of Water and Power site proposed by state Sen. Richard Alarcon for a high school in the northeast Valley raises serious safety concerns, including the possibility of flooding and toxicity, besides not being centrally located to serve the burgeoning student population.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after the Los Angeles City Council took the first step to create a redevelopment area encompassing 6,835 acres of the northeast San Fernando Valley, the proposal has bogged down, sharply dividing a citizens panel. The plan for the city's largest redevelopment area is more than a year behind schedule, and the group of local residents and merchants the council formed to offer advice appears deadlocked over whether the plan should go forward.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1999 | SUE FOX
The Los Angeles City Council approved a change Wednesday to the Sun Valley Community Plan to allow construction of a 65,700-square-foot public storage building on land partly zoned for residential use. The 1.4-acre parcel, at 8802 Helen Ave. at the intersection of Glenoaks Boulevard and Vinedale Street in La Tuna Canyon, has been vacant for years.
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